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Nomad: A Global Approach to Interior Style Hardcover – November 23, 2011


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Nomad: A Global Approach to Interior Style + The Life of a Bowerbird: Creating Beautiful Interiors with the Things You Collect + Gypsy: A World of Colour & Interiors
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books (November 23, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1452104964
  • ISBN-13: 978-1452104966
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 8.6 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #253,310 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Sibella Court is a celebrated designer who works with Anthropologie, owns her shop, The Society Inc, and is the author of the acclaimed book, Etcetera. She lives in Sydney, Australia.

More About the Author

Sibella Court has had a 20-year international career as an interior stylist. She has been based in Sydney since 2008 after over ten years living and working in New York. In Australia she creates interiors for the Merivale Group and private clients, her most recent spaces including: El Loco, MsG's, Palmer & Co., The Fish Shop and Mr Wong. She is the award-winning author of books, 'Etcetera etc', 'The Stylist's Guide to NYC', 'Nomad' and 'Bowerbird'. Sibella's books are personal, functional & aesthetically beautiful reflections of her style and the way she sees the world. Sibella is the owner of shop, The Society inc. and product designer with a 110-colour paint range, nail polish, soap, candles and a hardware range. She spends her time exploring for inspiration across the globe in backstreets, markets & fairs discovering new artists, designers & products for her shop & commercial designs and holding workshops. After living in New York styling and concepting for the likes of Bergdorf Goodman, Jo Malone, Donna Karan, Gourmet, Bloomingdales, West Elm, Saks Fifth Avenue and Domino to name a few, she continues to collaborate on projects in the States and looks forward to opening a studio in New York soon selling her own wholesale product ranges range. Sibella works extensively with Anthropologie, travelling on their inspiration trips and designing product ranges for them. She regularly contributes to VogueLiving, Vogue, Harper's Bazaar and InsideOut and has been involved with television shows, as a judge on Channel 9's 'HomeMADE' and featured on Keith Johnson's 'Man Shops Globe'. Sibella is currently working on further books, ranges and an array of design projects including designing an island.

Customer Reviews

A lot of pretty pictures, on pretty paper in a nice binding.
L. Zea
I'm going to guess this is just very unfortunate timing and that the book was already well on its way to being published before the uprising.
M. Fox
Just having pretty pictures did not make it worth it for me to keep the book.
S. Shields

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By ufobooks on December 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover
If you have Etcetera (first book of this type) then you pretty much have Nomad, the same ideas are rehashed except she used 5 countries of inspiration Mexico, Italy, Syria, India and Japan (about 10-15 pages each, some pages more jumbled than others). Her ideas or sources of ideas are repeated in parts, and her instructions on design is small. A few sentences per a page (not a big deal as this is her style of writing), but a note if you are expecting deeper information on nomad life and wares, this is not the book. This is more a travel log of what she has seen and about herself (an excessive use of "I" overload). If you are new to Sibella Court or like the countries mentioned this may be an okay book, but I think Etcetera is the better book as it has more design and better use of props and objects in home design. Some good things about the book include the choice of paper and binding, and the Japan chapter was a nice start.
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39 of 46 people found the following review helpful By M. Fox on December 19, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
First, the good:
The book is beautiful and hefty. The cover is thick and ornate, and the pages are a pleasure to turn. Beautiful photographs with beautiful lighting illustrate beautiful ideas. This is the kind of book you want to snuggle down with at the end of a long day, in your deepest armchair, with a glass of wine.

The average: I bought it because I live in Japan (the first country featured) and was looking for new ideas. I learned a few new things, but this book is primarily to indulge the senses and not to inform. You won't find explanations of most items featured. So if you want to search on ebay for the Japanese bamboo ladle pictured on page 56, you had better already know that it is a bamboo ladle used in tea ceremony. As another reviewer mentioned, the book reads like Sibella Court's travel diary. If the navel-gazing becomes too much, you can just skip the text (there's not much) and enjoy the eye candy.

The bad: Unfortunately, the 4th country profiled is Syria. I'm going to guess this is just very unfortunate timing and that the book was already well on its way to being published before the uprising. The chapter is well-photographed and fascinating, but definitely uncomfortable to read in light of current events. Hopefully, in a few years time, there will have been a happy ending and readers will be able to follow her travels there. There is also some awkwardness with her romanticized views of these countries ("I have had a longtime love affair with the romantic side of colonialism...", etc). Obviously, this is a book on design and not history, but her failure to even hint at the problematic caused a bit of squirming. On my part, at least.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By LKP on March 7, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed this book. Both of Court's earlier books were given to me as gifts, from artist friends, and those books set the stage for my anticipation for what she would do next. I thought this book was a viable and interesting follow-up to her earlier projects.....not simply a mere
"warmed over" version of them, as offered by some reviewers. I was not expecting some kind of ultra-practical Design Manual from her -- I think she has built her brand on her role as an inveterate collector, gatherer, "a person who notices", and uber stylist/stager of Great Stuff. The writing style is,
alas, a bit off-hand and spontaneous -- but text is hardly the point with a book like this. To me, the strength of this book is......Once you look through it, you will be reminded of the joys of travel, and how wonderful it is to spend some time in a different culture and hit the "Refresh" button. Her solutions for decor and staging are about bringing things out of the drawers, placing them around in new fresh ways, and then re-vamping and re-imagining it on a regular basis. This book isn't for people who feel they need to follow a Manual for decorating -- but I would recommend it to creative people who want to live in a home that has verve, individuality and authentic vibrancy. (In addition, I really thought the production aspect of the book was excellent with more-than-usual care given to page design, paper stock, embossed covers, etc. A treat for the eyes.)
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Leonie on February 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has a beautiful quality about it, it is printed on beautiful paper and the photographs are beautifully shot. The only complaint I would have is that for an interior decoration book there aren't many photographs of completed rooms, it is more like design mock-ups. I would have liked to have seen more interior shots.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By L. Zea on February 23, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The front page and the title of this book seemed so promising but essentially this is nothing but what appears to be a published ibook of someone's travelogue. Court refers to herself over and over again and "I" is used on every other page. The ways in which she talks about some of the countries seem fairy-talish and a little naive at times with a very romanticized overload. For design advice it is not useful at all as it is mainly pretty pictures. A close up of a pair of shoes or a cute picture of a half a bicycle does nothing to understand how to create interesting interiors. Other ideas are not very functional - like pretty wall paper rolled out on the floor by a bed or a cute wood sofa covered with prizes. This book reminds me of a book you would make for a friend after your trip to show off where you went - but as a global approach to interior design? I don't think so. A lot of pretty pictures, on pretty paper in a nice binding.
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