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Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga Series) MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged


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Nomads of Gor (Gorean Saga Series) + Priest-Kings of Gor (Gorean Saga Series) + Outlaw of Gor (Gorean Saga Series)
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Product Details

  • Series: Gorean Saga Series (Book 4)
  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; MP3 Una edition (January 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441849114
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441849113
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (43 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,751,817 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Scientific American

..Replete with considerable action, sword play, descriptions of exotic lands, strange peoples, unusual customs and weird flora and fauna. And it is here that Norman really excels. he limns a rich tapestry, enveloping the reader in the strangeness of Gor, yet doing it so well, in such generally careful detial, that it seems less a novel than an actual recounting of one man's adventures. It is clearly apparent that he has sent much time in "building" his world... --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Wouldn't it be wonderful if Edgar Rice Burroughs were alive today, creating new worlds and characters, and maybe continuing the adventures of John Carter of Barsoom? I would even settle for the next best thing: another writer who uses the style and brilliance of Burroughs. Well, friends, I believe we have the second best thing right under our noses! The young author John Norman has written a series which bears an amazing resemblance to the Barsoom chronicles; Tarl Cabot on the counter-earth planet of Gor.... If you long to live the glories of another Barsoom, come with me to Gor and enjoy more topnotch fantasy. -- Michael Bell --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
25
4 star
12
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3
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See all 43 customer reviews
This is the fourth book in the Gorean Saga.
Jeremy Richmond
This is the book that is most like "Princess of Mars" by Edgar Rice Burroughs, which I highly recommend.
silliman89
This book has some very humorous characters and lots of action and detail about the world of Gor.
H. Mills

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 51 people found the following review helpful By silliman89 on July 17, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read the Gor series as a boy in the 70's and early 80's. IMHO the series is most appealing to teenage boys. I recently pulled "Assassins of Gor" off the shelf one night while bored, and re-read it. I was shocked that there was no real sex, and only a handful of pages of philosophy and psychology that I had to skip over. The book was really excellent, although in a straight forward, uncomplicated sort of way. These are escapist novels, richly detailed, which immerse you in an exotic world, not real thinkers. My enduring memories were of the later books in the series, which were almost unreadable because whole chapters were devoted to philosophy and psychology.
I am not offended by the idea that it is natural and enjoyable for women to be submissive to men. Although I recognize it as wish fulfillment fantasy, still I consider it harmless, especially in such an obviously fictitious setting. I even found it mildly interesting the first time it was mentioned. It is the umpteenth repetition that I find boring. I just turn those pages, skipping ahead to the next action sequence. Speaking of wish fulfillment, I wish someone would edit the series, and re-publish it without these parts. Maybe Eric Flint could do it? He likes to edit, according to his afterword to "1633" and he's good at it. Of course, if you take the sex out of Gor you get Barsoom, and that story has already been written.
I looked on Amazon to see if there was anything new going on with the series, and there was. It is being reprinted, starting at the beginning, and at least 2 new books seem to be published, or at least in the works. I was disappointed though that Amazon didn't have the whole series listed under one easy to find heading.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 3, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have always considered "Assassins of Gor" to be John Norman's magnum opus in his Counter-Earth series, but there is no more enjoyable novel than the novel that comes before it "Nomads of Gor." After bonding with the Priest-King Misk, Tarl Cabot is sent from the Sardar Mountains to find the last egg of the Priest-Kings, which has been hidden among the Wagon People. Unfortunately, the Wagon People are probably the most xenophobic on Gor and will not take kindly to Cabot just walking up and joining them.
"Nomads of Gor" has two great strengths, both of which are rather unique to the series. First, Norman does a masterful job of creating the civilization of the Wagon People, which consists of four tribes. I suppose he might be basing his research on some nomadic tribes of Earth, but I did not sense any strong parallels as I did, for example, with the "Viking" like "Marauders of Gor." We get a sense of the culture of the Tuchuks, one of the four tribes that Cabot stays with as he searches for the egg, which goes well beyond what we have seen up to this point in the series. The customs, especially the competitive games the Wagon Peoples play, are much more detailed than what we had seen in the towered cities of Ar and Ko-ro-ba.
Second, this is the funniest of the Gor books, with the humor coming mostly from conversations that involve the character of Harold the Tuchuk, although Kamchak, also of the Tuchucks, has his moments as well. It is not far fetched to say that these are two best-developed supporting characters in the Gor series, and I would contend that this is due in large measure to their sense of humor. But the humor is clearly Norman's, who has this style of using short sentences to develop his droll wit.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 27, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I feel this book was the best book of the series, the plot line was wonderful, a small mixture of mystery involved in the task Tarl had to complete.
However- yet again we see how very Weak our Hero is when faced with women. He strives so very hard to be a good "Gorean" male- and always seems to fail in some small respect.
This book spurred the creation of a LARP group- the TUCHUX's which sometimes come out to SCA events. a very good read, and ties in nicely with books much loater in the series.
If you read only One Gor Book- this sould be it!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 25, 1998
Format: Paperback
Jumping right into action, the reader may be a little confused for the first page or two, but this is short-lived, as John Norman supplies abundant descriptions and footnotes to edify the reader. The book follows a great story plot of the Wagon People of the great prairies of southern Gor.
Tarl Cabot, main character in most of the series, visits the Wagon People, who bear some historical paralells to the Mongol tribes under Ghengis Khan in the early 1200's, questing for an item for the mysterious Priest-Kings. In the course of this search he helps the Thuchuk tribes in a war forced upon them by their neighbors.
Of all the books of the Gor series, this is the one that probably has the greatest fan following. I have personal knowledge that at least two groups, with around 300+ members between them, have existed since the 1970's as fans of this book only, ignoring to some degree the rest of the series.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By silliman89 on July 17, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read the Gor series as a boy in the 70's and early 80's. IMHO the series is most appealing to teenage boys. I recently pulled "Assassins of Gor" off the shelf one night while bored, and re-read it. I was shocked that there was no real sex, and only a handful of pages of philosophy and psychology that I had to skip over. The book was really excellent, although in a straight forward, uncomplicated sort of way. These are escapist novels, richly detailed, which immerse you in an exotic world, not real thinkers. My enduring memories were of the later books in the series, which were almost unreadable because whole chapters were devoted to philosophy and psychology.
I am not offended by the idea that it is natural and enjoyable for women to be submissive to men. Although I recognize it as wish fulfillment fantasy, still I consider it harmless, especially in such an obviously fictitious setting. I even found it mildly interesting the first time it was mentioned. It is the umpteenth repetition that I find boring. I just turn those pages, skipping ahead to the next action sequence. Speaking of wish fulfillment, I wish someone would edit the series, and re-publish it without these parts. Maybe Eric Flint could do it? He likes to edit, according to his afterword to "1633" and he's good at it. Of course, if you take the sex out of Gor you get Barsoom, and that story has already been written.
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