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Non-state Threats and Future Wars Paperback – October 2, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-0714683089 ISBN-10: 0714683086 Edition: 0th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (October 2, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0714683086
  • ISBN-13: 978-0714683089
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #135,871 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'This book presents a blueprint for the military and law enforcement agencies of the US to innovate and prepare for the battles of World War IV. It is a comprehensive and intensely composed book on the subject of asymmetrical warfare as fought by non-state warriors.'

David Bradford, Special Warfare

'The authors recognize the new enemies of our nation, encourage innovative thinking in our institutions, demand that bureaucratic demarcations be overcome, and, above all, call for the creation (and growth) of smarter institutions ... this book should be required reading by those who serve in special warfare.'

David Bradford, Special Warfare

 

 


More About the Author

Dr. Robert J. Bunker is an Epochal Warfare Studies scholar and security consultant focusing on non-state opposing force research, analysis, and defeat strategies. He holds a Ph.D. in political science from the Claremont Graduate University, five other university degrees, and has both undertaken and provided counter-terrorism related training. He has over 200 publications including numerous edited works, booklets, chapters, and articles in policy, law enforcement, and military venues. Present associations include the Claremont Graduate University as adjunct faculty and Small Wars Journal-El Centro as a Senior Fellow. Past associations include the Los Angeles High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (LA-HIDTA), Counter-OPFOR Corporation, University of Southern California, FBI Academy (as Futurist in Residence), National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center--West, and the Los Angeles Terrorism Early Warning Group.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Robert David STEELE Vivas HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on August 31, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Edit of 21 Dec 07 to add links.

The authors, with the exception of those writing about intelligence, are world-class, and if you have not read many books about 4th Generation Warfare, non-traditional threats, and non-state actors as forces in their own right, then this is a superb single book to obtain and read.

If, on the other hand, you have read most of the books and articles written by these talented individuals, you will find the book irritatingly "old"--most of these ideas were published ten years ago, and the book is a superb undergraduate publication well-suited for those who have not done the prior reading.

The book is a reflection of its institutional provenance, and brings together a mix of defense writers and the current crop of transnational crime academics and practitioners. It does not adequately discuss the non-violent traditional threats (water and resource scarcity, mass migration and genocide, pollution and corruption, inter alia), and it does not really discuss the future in creative ways.

There is no index and the bibliography is marginal.

There is one bright spot, and it alone makes the book worthy of purchase: Phil Williams, a top academic with superb law enforcement and national security connections at the working level, provides a preface that is concise and useful. He begins by pointing out that Clinton as well as Bush to date have ignored non-state threats, specifically including terrorism, and failed to understand the gravity and imminence of the asymmetrical threat. He lists five realities and three solutions:

Reality #1: International security is more complex. It is not sufficient to focus only on states.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christian Rasmussen on February 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
Non-State Threats and Future Wars edited by Robert J. Bunker brings together a world-class team of defense scholars, law enforcement specialists, and military thinkers like Martin van Creveld and Ralph Peters to speak about issues that are truly post-Soviet: the changing nature of warfare, decentralized intelligence structures, the continuing blur between law enforcement and military operations, the use of mercenaries, non-lethal weapons, and preparing for intense urban operations. Non-State Threats and Future Wars like most national security study-related books written in the last ten years or so, starts off with the proverbial introductory phrase "since the collapse of the Soviet Union." However, unlike most books on the national security studies market, Non-State Threats and Futures Wars reaches beyond most so-called "post-Soviet ideas" like adding a new kind of sensor package to a tank and calling that an innovation fit for the new battlespace. In fact most of the authors who contributed to this book would question the utility of the main battle tank entirely.
T. Lindsay Moore's article "Fourth Epochal War" questions the utility of military concepts of "exhaustion" and/or "wars of density," which he defines as antiquated concepts of warfare unable to adapt to the realities of the new battlefield. Moore draws upon the lessons of history to demonstrate his point.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Christian Rasmussen on February 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
"Non-State Threats and Future Wars" edited by Robert J. Bunker brings together a world-class team of defense scholars, law enforcement specialists, and military thinkers like Martin van Creveld and Ralph Peters to speak about issues that are truly post-Soviet: the changing nature of warfare, decentralized intelligence structures, the continuing blur between law enforcement and military operations, the use of mercenaries, non-lethal weapons, and preparing for intense urban operations. "Non-State Threats and Future Wars" like most national security study-related books written in the last ten years or so, starts off with the proverbial introductory phrase "since the collapse of the Soviet Union." However, unlike most books on the national security studies market, "Non-State Threats and Futures Wars" reaches beyond most so-called "post-Soviet ideas" like adding a new kind of sensor package to a tank and calling that an innovation fit for the new battlespace. In fact most of the authors who contributed to this book would question the utility of the main battle tank entirely.
T. Lindsay Moore's article "Fourth Epochal War" questions the utility of military concepts of "exhaustion" and/or "wars of density," which he defines as antiquated concepts of warfare unable to adapt to the realities of the new battlefield. Moore draws upon the lessons of history to demonstrate his point.
Read more ›
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