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Norse Magic (Llewellyn's World Religion & Magick) Paperback – March 3, 2012


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Product Details

  • Series: Llewellyn's World Religion & Magick
  • Paperback: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Publications (March 3, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0875421377
  • ISBN-13: 978-0875421377
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #629,063 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Many people are familiar with Greek and Roman mythology. But even though the Norse people remained pagans for centuries after most of Europe had converted to Christianity, very little is generally known of their mythology.

That is one of the reasons I'm glad Llewellyn has published D. J. Conway's Norse Magic. Even if you're not interested in following the path of Norse Paganism, this book helps to correct the lack of information that has been available. Here you will find page after page of the history, mythology, lore and rituals of the Norse. For example, you will find a comprehensive list of over 150 Norse gods, goddesses, supernatural beings, places and things, including a guide to the correct pronunciation of each term.

If you are interested in following the path of Norse Paganism, this book can become your most important resource. Included are rituals for each of the seasonal holidays, including Imbolc, Spring Equinox, Walpurgisnacht, Sonnenwende, Lunasa, Autumn Equinox, and the Feast of the Fallen Warriors. You will also learn about the gods and goddesses from the Norse point of view.

And then there's the magic! You will learn how to cast the magic circle and what magical tools you need. You will learn a wide variety of magics, including herb magic, elf magic, cord magic, and cauldron magic. You'll also discover the secrets of the Norse runes and how to use them for divination.

It is time to make the spiritual history of all cultures easily available for anyone who is interested in learning about them. This book is perfect for anyone who is eager to learn more about the powerful magic and mythology of Norse spirituality.

About the Author

A native of the Pacific Northwest, author D.J. Conway has studied the occult fields for over 35 years. Her quest for knowledge has covered every aspect of Paganism and Wicca to New Age and Eastern philosophies; plus history, the magical arts, philosophy, customs, mythologies and folklore. In 1998, she was voted Best Wiccan and New Age author by Silver Chalice, a Pagan magazine.

Conway is the author of  more than 20 nonfiction  books including: Celtic Magic (Llewellyn), Dancing with Dragons (Llewellyn), Mystical Dragon Magic (Llewellyn), The Ancient Art of Faery Magick (10 Speed Press), and The Little Book of Candle Magic (10 Speed Press).

She lives a rather quiet life, with most of her time spent researching and writing.

 


More About the Author

A native of the Pacific Northwest, author D.J. Conway has studied the occult fields for over 50 years. Born in 1939, in Hood River, Oregon to a family of Irish, North Germanic, and Native American decent, her quest for knowledge has covered every aspect of Paganism, Wicca, New Age, and Eastern philosophies; to include history, the magickal arts, philosophies customs, mythologies and folklore. In 1998 she was voted Best Wiccan and New Age author by Silver Chalice, a Pagan magazine. In 2006, her book, Elemental Magick, was a finalist for a COVR award, and she has been featured on television shows such as Journey with Brenda Roberts.

Customer Reviews

And I'm sure that other book is just as terrible as this one.
"eccentragedy"
I would not recommend burning herbs in them, and you may find that it has a disruptive presence when you try to raise power.
Michael L. Rayborn
I am "Norse Wiccan" but luckily I did not base my Tradition on this book!
Eric C. Moscon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Michael L. Rayborn on December 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is my perspective on this book......

This book is filled with many errors. Here goes:

1. Djinni, Sylphs, and Gnomes are not a part of the Northern Tradition. Sylphs are Greek, Gnomes are Roman, Djinni are Persian.

2. Like many Wiccans, she insists on trying to merge Celtic and Germanic holidays. For an example, Samhain and Yule, all though celebrated on different months, represent the same thing. This is because the *growing seasons* for the Celts and the Teutons were different because they were located in different parts of Europe.

3. Some Heathens may feel that "casting a circle" is not a part of Germanic Magic. Not true. This technique is mentioned in Anglo Saxon Manuscripts. See the Travelers Charm in the book Anglo Saxon Magic by Godfrid Storms. Therefore, this can be forgiven.

4. She made the error of mentioning Earth, Air, Fire, and Water as elements to be called in the corners. This comes from Greco-Roman sources. However, in the Prose Edda (the creation myth), there are five major elements mentioned: Ice (which is North), Fire (which is South) , Earth (which is "in the middle"), as well as Air and Water. The last two are not given any kind of directional qualities in the creation myth, HOWEVER, the Vanaheim is said to be in the west and it is "watery" and their is a Storm Ent in the shape of an eagle the generates winds in Jotunheim, which is "to the east". She does say that one can opt to use the Earth, Air, Fire, Water, and Ice elements and she does alot them in the appropriate directions and even mentioned the dwarves Nordhri, Sudhri, Austri, and Vestri. Therefore, she can be forgiven for this.

5. She mentions the "raising the cone of power". Many Heathens may disagree with this practice....
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is almost verbatim of Conway's Celtic Magic book. Its basically Wiccan ritual form watered down into a generic germanic stew. It feels disrespectful to the Nordic Gods and Goddesses and treats the runes like a dimestore fortune telling device. The Runes are a way of understanding the universe, a way to seek inner wisdom, a way of self empowerment. Odhinn hung on Yggdrasil sacrificing himself to himself for a little more then to find out whether or not some guy likes your little sister or if you will win the lotto. The runes are archetypes of the universe and need to be approached seriously and with pure intention. DJ Conway's intention here is a nice residual from the pockets of people who dont know any better, she treats them casually and superficially for the most thought-crippled individuals.
This book is punsihment to read. If you are serious about learning, look elsewhere. If you want to learn the runes and get a serious feel for the Northern Magickal and religious cycle, read Edred Thorrsson or Freya Aswynn. If you want to learn the mythology read the Poetic Edda or even Norse Myths by Kevin Crossley Holland. There are so many great resources out there, that your money could be better spent almost anywhere. Skip this and read Thorrsson.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Z. Walters on July 21, 2004
Format: Paperback
I found this book offensive as a pagan. I have no problem with Wicca as a religion, nor with those that admit it when they plaster other people's gods and goddesses onto Wicca. What I do have a problem with is when one obviously did enough research on the Norse religion to know that it has very little in common with Wicca, and still claim that the Norse were Wiccan. Freya and Freyr as the main deities? Where did that come from? I guess Odin was too manly to be the principal male in her mind. The author not only ignored all research done by reconstructionists pagans, but she had to make Freyr, the most effeminate of the Norse gods, the principal male.

This was, unfortunately, the first book on the occult and Norse magic that I read. Luckily, I actually did some research on the subject, and was able to discard it as useless in under a week. I will say, however, the book is quite well constructed. I have ran over it with a truck, left it outside for weeks at a time, used it as a coaster, etc., and the cover hasn't even fallen all the way off yet.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Eric C. Moscon on February 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
While Conway's idea may have been in the right place, she unfortunatly did not do the required research. I am "Norse Wiccan" but luckily I did not base my Tradition on this book!

(I was forwarned before doing so!)

For those interested in building a Wiccan Tradition that is Norse or Germanic based I suggest the following books:

1) Wiccan: Beliefs and Practices by Gary Cantrell

- Not Norse, but a very good Wicca 101 book to serve as

a blueprint.

2) Witchdom of the True by Edred

- Shows how Gardnerian Wicca has its roots in Traditional

Old English "Wiccecraeft" and the Cults of the Vanir from

Scandinavia who worshiped the "Lord and Lady" (Freyr

and Freyja)as there primary deities. YOU HAVE TO READ

THIS BOOK!!! It's availible from Runa Raven Press:

[...]

3) Hammer of the Gods by Swain Wodening

- This is a book Anglo-Saxon Heathenism, but if read the

above book, you see why it is nessesary.

4) Germanic Heathenry: A Pratical Guide by James Hjuka Coulter

- This is the ultimate book on Germanic Paganism. A must

read!

5) Northern Mysteries & Magick by Freya Aswynn

- Aswynn is Asatru but with a Wiccan past, so her stuff

tends to be more on the "Vanic" side. Worth a read.

Using the above books, one can build a "Norse Wiccan" Tradition that is based on the historic folk traditions of Norse/Germanic Paganism, instead of the "fluffy bunny" and "New Age" stuff that Conway does with this book, which is basically a reprint of her Celtic Magic book with the names changed to Norse Gods and Goddesses.
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