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North Carolina Remembers Gettysburg Paperback – March 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 172 pages
  • Publisher: Ten Roads Publishing, LLC.; 1ST edition (March 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0982527543
  • ISBN-13: 978-0982527542
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 7.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #881,774 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Michael C. Hardy has written numerous books, articles and essays focusing on the Civil War. He lives in western North Carolina and has won the Willie Parker Peace History Book Award six times. He has also been presented the Jefferson Davis Historical Gold Medal by the United Daughters of the Confederacy for his work on preserving Confederate history. In 2010, Hardy was recognized as North Carolina Historian of the Year.

More About the Author

Mention North Carolina's role during the Civil War, and at some point, the conversation will include the name of award-winning author and historian Michael C. Hardy. Michael's large body of work on the Old North State and the War Between the States includes numerous books, articles, and blog posts on topics ranging from specific battles, regiments, and personalities, to the experiences of North Carolinians before, during and after the war.

History has been a life-long passion for Michael. He participated in his first Civil War re-enactment at the age of ten in 1982. Since then, he has participated in hundreds of events in locations ranging from south Florida to Pennsylvania. Some of the highlights include the 125th Gettysburg; the 130th Murfreesboro; the 135th Antietam; the 135th Gettysburg, which was the largest re-enactment ever held; the 135th Nashville; the 135th Chickamauga; and the 140th Manassas. Michael has served in nearly every position imaginable, from medical steward, to color sergeant, to colonel of an infantry battalion. He has also volunteered as an interpreter at local museums and state and national parks, and has presented hundreds of programs for schools, libraries, scout troops, and churches. Michael has spent a vast amount of time researching the day-to-day lives of mid-nineteenth-century Americans in an effort to effectively communicate the experiences of the past to people today.

Michael's efforts to preserve, document, and teach history have grown far beyond re-enacting and living history. He is a serious reader and book collector. His personal library contains hundreds of books on nineteenth-century American history. Two specific sections of the collection are nearly exhaustive, featuring virtually every text on Robert E. Lee and just about every book on North Carolina and the Civil War.

In the mid-1990s, Michael began his professional writing career; his first published piece was a biography on Brig. Gen. Collett Leventhorpe in North and South Magazine. Since then, Michael has continued to research and write about battles, people, and places. He has a particular passion for regimentals. So far, his regimentals have focused on two groups with very different histories and wartime experiences: the Thirty-seventh North Carolina Troops was a Tar Heel regiment that fought in some of the most storied battles of the war's Eastern Theater and lost more men to death than any other Tar heel regiment, while the Fifty-eighth north Carolina Troops, the largest infantry regiment from North Carolina, fought in the Western Theater and was plagued by record numbers of desertions. Michael has also devoted his energies to crafting much-needed histories of battles, such as Hanover Court House (1862) and the Brooksville-Bayport Raid (1864). The subject of remembrance is one dear to Michael's heart, and has been showcased in Remembering North Carolina's Confederates, as well as in his 2011 books North Carolina Remembers Gettysburg and North Carolina in the Civil War. In addition to his books, he has continued to contribute focused and meticulously researched articles to national publications such as America's Civil War and Gettysburg Magazine.

Since 1995, Michael has lived in the mountains of western North Carolina, an ideal location for his work, as it places him about five hours from either Atlanta, the heart of the Western Theater of the War, or Richmond, Virginia, the heart of the Eastern Theater of the War. Plus, western North Carolina, where some of Michael's ancestors first settled in the 1770s, has plenty of its own stories, some of which Michael has been privileged to tell in books and articles. Thanks to the magic of technology, Michael attended the University of Alabama, majoring in Community Studies with a focus on Civil War history.

Michael is a six-time winner of the Willie Parker Peace History Book Award from the North Carolina Society of Historians. In 2009 he was presented the Jefferson Davis Historical Gold Medal by the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and the Superior Achievement Award from the Sons of Confederate Veterans, both for his work in preserving Confederate history. In October 2010, Michael was honored as the North Carolina Historian of the Year by the North Carolina Society of Historians.

Michael consults with a number other authors and organizations in their work, answering a legion of emails from researchers ranging from amateur genealogists to scholars at major museums, libraries, and educational institutions. He has assisted several museums with displays about the Civil War, and at times even loans articles from his own collection for display. Michael has also worked as a historical consultant for several well-known fiction writers, including New York Times best-seller Sharyn McCrumb, answering questions about the Civil War or western North Carolina. Through his very popular North Carolina and the Civil War blog, Michael shares his research and insights and invites conversation from readers.

Michael regularly volunteers with a number of local historical societies and associations. He is a member of numerous national organizations, like the Civil War Trust, The Society of Civil War Historians, and the Sons of Confederate Veterans. He lives with his wife Elizabeth, an English professor at Mayland Community College and acclaimed literary scholar, their wonderful son Nathaniel (born in April 2001), and their beautiful daughter Isabella (born in December 2006) high up on the side of a mountain.
To learn more about Michael, visit www.michaelchardy.com.

Customer Reviews

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joe Owen VINE VOICE on April 4, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
North Carolina sent thousands of men to fight in General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. These regiments of the ANV fought in numerous battles and skirmishes from 1861 to 1865 including the largest battle of the Civil War, Gettysburg. North Carolina historian and author Michael C. Hardy gathered letters, official reports, newspaper articles, diary entries, from the men who fought at Gettysburg. This invaluable resource from the men tell of the terrible and great battle and what they did and observed during the battle. From the opening day of battle on July 1, 1863 to the final day of the major battle on July 3, 1863 many of the soldiers recollections (some days after the battle, and some decades after the battle) describe the fierce fighting, troop movements and placements, chaos, carnage, valor, and viciousness of what they did and the soldiers who fought with them. From Lt. Colonel Robert C. Donnell of the 45th North Carolina Infantry who described the death of the regiment's color guard to a reunion described in 1897 of a soldier who is reunited with the Union soldier who shot him in battle, these letters, reports, diaries are written in descriptive style which puts the reader in "the thick of the battle".
Mr. Hardy has done a tremendous and valuable job contributing to the history of the Battle of Gettysburg by researching and publishing the accounts of the soldiers of North Carolina in the battle. Who can forget the 1877carnage wrecked upon the famous 26th North Carolina Infantry Regiment? Their ferocious fighting and loss in battle is told by the soldiers themselves in this outstanding book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Deborah C on July 11, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found a book that they reader got another view about the Battle of Gettysbury. I am from North Carolina so I found it even more informative! I would Recommend it to anyone interested in the Civil War cause it only adds to their knowledge of the battle. The book is very interesting and readable. The book explains the role other States made in famous battles!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Keith Jones on December 5, 2012
Format: Paperback
North Carolina Remembers Gettysburg is a treasure trove of first hand accounts from the N.C. Soldiers who were there. Relying mostly on newspaper accounts beginning in the days following the battle up until the latter days of their lives, the native sons of the Old North State who wore the gray, replay their experiences on the bloody fields. Closely examined are the rebuttals the soldiers made to a book by Col. Robert Taylor of Gen. Robert E. Lee's staff, that misreported the facts of the final charge. Taylor had written that Maj. Gen. George Pickett's division was the only organized body of troops making the charge and entering the Yankee lines. He falsely contended that the troops of Brig. Gen. J. Johnston Pettigrew and Maj. Gen Isaac Trimble were simply in support and far behind Pickett's force. These troops of former University of North Carolina professor Pettigrew and railroad executive Trimble were largely North Carolinians. The papers of the state led by the Raleigh Observer were quick to solicit these reports refuting Taylor's book.

North Carolina Remembers Gettysburg was formulated out of the numerous articles that historian Michael Hardy collected while researching his books on the various regiments North Carolina contributed to the Confederate cause. If you are interested in Gettysburg and enjoy reading these old first hand accounts, then this book is for you.

This book is not so much an organized history like most of Hardy's books, but it is rather a collection of source material. It is enjoyable in the sense that it shows you the battle as the soldiers saw it, not as historians now interpret it. There is no modern day postulating nor speculating of intentions. It is simply the words of the men who were there as delivered to their contemporaries.
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I bought this book to look for any mention of a relatives unit but was unsuccessful. Did find this book to be an interesting read and a good addtion to my library.
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