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North Dallas Forty (Hall of Fame Edition) Paperback – September 4, 2003


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Product Details

  • Series: Hall of Fame Edition (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 314 pages
  • Publisher: Sport Media Publishing (September 4, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0973144335
  • ISBN-13: 978-0973144338
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.7 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,549,620 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

I have read and re-read this book 3 or 4 times.
D. C. Postle
If you're going to read the book and see the movie, I recommend the film first then the book.
Dallas
The book is well-written, funny, entertaining and held my attention throughout.
Charles L. Ainsworth

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By John Royal on January 2, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There's a good reason that Sports Illustrated included this book in its list of the Greatest Sports Books ever: it's a good book. And the movie version is far tamer than the book, and compared to the book, the movie has an upbeat ending.
North Dallas Forty, an thinly-veiled insider view of the Dallas Cowboys of the late-1960s. Written by a former Cowboys' wide receiver, the book takes you inside a football franchise struggling to stay on top. After reading the book, your body aches -- you know what it feels to be drilled in the ribs while running over the middle.
Watch the team and the NFL go out of the way to protect the stars while throwing aside those pawns that make the greats great. Read this book and become disgusted by the NFL, the owners, the coaches, and the entire league apparatus, but glory in the sheer talent and determination of the players doing the only thing that they know how to do.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By James Sadler on January 31, 2004
Format: Paperback
Pete Gent's most famous work was reissued a few months ago and hopefully it garners as much attention now as it did when originally issued. Ostensibly a thinly veiled semi-biography of his own pro football experiences, the book, when originally issued, was considered scandalous as it exposed the underside of the professional football world.
At the center of the novel is Phil Elliot, a fairly talented tight end who relies on pain killers to get him through the season. He carouses with the quarterback, only to ultimately find that the man he considered his closest friend when not be there for him in the end, and downs alcohol and drugs with a sense of abandon. To Elliot's mind, he is a team player because of his willingness to play with pain, taking painful, burning shots of cortisone in his knees in order to practice and play. But to his coaches, he is a loose cannon who they will only tolerate so long as he is useful to the team.
Ultimately, Elliot loses the game he loves. He learns that his only real value to the team is his ability to perform and when the side issues with him outweigh his talent to catch a pass, he loses that which he loved above all else (even if he would not admit it to himself): the game.
If you've seen the movie, you've only gotten a taste of the novel. Gent has written other books, but this remains his best. The book exposed a raw nerve at the time of its first release and was decried in many corners as nothing more than the fanciful tirade of a embittered former player. Instead, over the years we've learned that Gent's revelations regarding sex, drugs, and alcohol abuse in the NFL were all too true. And despite stringent drug testing rules, all of the problems exposed in his novel are still present in the NFL today.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 2, 1998
Format: Hardcover
NDF, written by former Dallas Cowboy, Peter Gent is one week in the life of Phil Elliot, professional football player. The work is a piece of fiction, but firmly planted in the reality of Gent's pro-football career.
Gent unfolds his story with graphic violence, graphic sex and absolute savage humor. Any sports fan who ever wondered what professional football/sports was really like behind the TV cameras, should read this novel. Memorable characters that parallel real-life football stars, and a great pace make this book one of my favorites. To quote one critic of the book, "...Gent isn't a great football player who just happened to be a talented writer, but he's a great writer who just happened to play football. North Dallas Forty is a must-read."
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 25, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
ND 40 is by far the best book about football that I have ever read. Gent's insight into the game and, much more importantly, the human condition is exemplary. There is abundant sex and violence but don't be misled; the allure of the novel is its compelling analysis of society and human relationships. The protagonist is a cynical tight end who uses pain-killing drugs to continue his career and mind-altering substances to deal with the vicissitudes of everyday life. One hectic week in his life is chronicled as he copes with crazed coaches and teammates, a new girl friend, and memories of a failed marriage. It's difficult to put this book down and I have read it about 4 times. (For what it's worth, I am a Phi Beta Kappan with a Ph.D in Psychlogy. ND 40 shows more insight into human behavior than a stack of texts). Do yourself a favor--read this book.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By nusandman on December 18, 2001
Format: Paperback
North Dallas 40 ranks right up there with some of the best books ever written about professional football. The characters in this book are able to invoke a full range of emotional responses from the reader. Gent is an extremely interesting writer and this book will be what he was remembered for.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
Peter Gent wrote other books after North Dallas Forty, but none of them were as forceful, or prescient, as this one. Fans and the media are always surprised by the drug scandals in the NFL. The revelations about cocaine and steroid use in the last 20 years have been greeted with a sense of shock and incredulity, as if these problems never existed in the NFL's glory years. North Dallas Forty is a thinly fictionalized account of the Dallas Cowboys of the late 60's and early 70's. Needless to say, drug use was just as big a problem in the NFL then as it is now, as Gent graphically illustates through the trials and tribulations of Phil Elliot. Anyone who has read this book realizes that drugs are not a new problem in sports, but a continuing one. The book is laced with savage humor, graphic sex, and an unflinching exploration of the dark side of the NFL. It is fun to pick out the fictional versions of real-life figures. B.A. Quinlan is obviously Tom Landry. Seth Maxwell is obviously Don Meredith. Delma Huddle is obviously Bob Hayes. This book illustrates that athletes are basically the same people that they were 30 years ago. They aren't better or worse. The main difference is a 24 hour media that magnifies players' actions for entertainment value and increased salaries.
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