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The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume A: The Middle Ages through the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century Paperback – March 15, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0393928303 ISBN-10: 0393928306 Edition: 8th

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1448 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 8th edition (March 15, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393928306
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393928303
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 0.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #223,234 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stephen Greenblatt (Ph.D. Yale) is Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University. Also General Editor of The Norton Anthology of English Literature, he is the author of eleven books, including The Swerve: How the World Became Modern (winner of the 2011 National Book Award and the 2012 Pulitzer Prize); Shakespeare's Freedom; Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare; Hamlet in Purgatory; Marvelous Possessions: The Wonder of the New World; Learning to Curse: Essays in Early Modern Culture; and Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare. He has edited seven collections of criticism, including Cultural Mobility: A Manifesto, and is a founding coeditor of the journal Representations. His honors include the MLA’s James Russell Lowell Prize, for both Shakespearean Negotiations: The Circulation of Social Energy in Renaissance England and The Swerve, the Sapegno Prize, the Distinguished Humanist Award from the Mellon Foundation, the Wilbur Cross Medal from the Yale University Graduate School, the William Shakespeare Award for Classical Theatre, the Erasmus Institute Prize, two Guggenheim Fellowships, and the Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of California, Berkeley. He was president of the Modern Language Association of America and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

M. H. Abrams (Ph.D. Harvard) is Class of 1916 Professor of English, Emeritus at Cornell University. He received the Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Prize for The Mirror and the Lamp and the MLA’s James Russell Lowell Prize for Natural Supernaturalism. He is also the author of The Milk of Paradise, A Glossary of Literary Terms, The Correspondent Breeze, and Doing Things with Texts. He is the recipient of Guggenheim, Ford Foundation, and Rockefeller Postwar fellowships, the Award in Humanistic Studies from the Academy of Arts and Sciences (1984), the Distinguished Scholar Award by the Keats-Shelley Society (1987), and the Award for Literature by the American Academy of Arts and Letters (1990). In 1999 The Mirror and the Lamp was ranked twenty-fifth among the Modern Library’s "100 best nonfiction books written in English during the twentieth century."

Alfred David (Ph.D. Harvard) is Professor of English Emeritus at Indiana University. He is the author of The Strumpet Muse: Art and Morals in Chaucer’s Poetry, and editor of the "Romaunt of the Rose" in The Riverside Chaucer and, with George B. Pace, "Chaucer’s Minor Poems I" in The Variorum Chaucer. He is the recipient of a Sheldon Travelling Fellowship and Guggenheim and Fulbright Research fellowships and past president of the New Chaucer Society.

Barbara K. Lewalski (Ph.D. Chicago) is William R. Kenan Professor of English and of History and Literature at Harvard University. She is the recipient of the MLA’s James Russell Lowell Prize for Protestant Poetics and the Seventeenth-Century Religious Lyric and the Explicator Prize for Donne’s Anniversaries and the Poetry of Praise. Her other books include Paradise Lost and the Rhetoric of Literary Forms, Writing Women in Jacobean England, Milton: A Critical Biography, and The Polemics and Poems of Rachel Speght (editor). Lewalski is the recipient of Guggenheim and NEH Senior fellowships and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and Honored Scholar of the Milton Society.

Lawrence Lipking (Ph.D. Cornell) is Professor of English and Chester D. Tripp Professor of Humanities at Northwestern University. He received the Phi Beta Kappa Christian Gauss Prize for The Life of the Poet. He is also the author of The Ordering of the Arts in Eighteenth-Century England; Abandoned Women and Poetic Tradition; and Samuel Johnson: The Life of an Author and editor of High Romantic Argument. Lipking is the recipient of Guggenheim, ACLS, Newberry Library, Wilson International Center for Scholars, and NEH Senior fellowships and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

George M. Logan (Ph.D. Harvard) is a Senior Fellow of Massey College in the University of Toronto and the James Cappon Professor of English Emeritus at Queen’s University, Canada, where he was head of the English Department for nine years and an award-winning teacher. He is the author of The Meaning of More’s Utopia and principal editor of the Cambridge edition of Utopia (Latin and English), editor of the Norton Critical Edition of Utopia (3rd edition), More’s History of King Richard the Third, and The Cambridge Companion to Thomas More, and coeditor, with Gordon Teskey, of Unfolded Tales: Essays on Renaissance Romance; he has also written a history of the Indiana University School of Music.

Katharine Eisaman Maus (Ph.D. Johns Hopkins) is James Branch Cabell Professor of English at the University of Virginia. She is the author of Being and Having in Shakespeare; Inwardness and Theater in the English Renaissance; and Ben Jonson and the Roman Frame of Mind; editor of a volume of Renaissance tragedies; and coeditor of English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology, The Norton Anthology of English Literature, and a collection of criticism on seventeenth-century English poetry. She has been awarded Guggenheim, Leverhulme, NEH, and ACLS fellowships, and the Roland Bainton Prize for Inwardness and Theater.

James Noggle (Ph.D. UC Berkeley) is Professor of English at Wellesley College. He is author of The Skeptical Sublime: Aesthetic Ideology in Pope and the Tory Satirists; his second book, The Temporality of Taste in Eighteenth-Century British Writing, is forthcoming from Oxford. He is the recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the American Philosophical Society.

James Simpson (Ph.D. Cambridge) is Douglas P. and Katherine B. Loker Professor of English at Harvard University and former Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at the University of Cambridge. An Honorary Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, he is the author of Piers Plowman: An Introduction to the B-Text (1990); Sciences and the Self in Medieval Poetry (1995); Reform and Cultural Revolution, 1350–1547; Volume 2 of The Oxford English Literary History (2002); Burning to Read: English Fundamentalism and Its Reformation Opponents (2007); and Under the Hammer: Iconoclasm in the Anglo-American Tradition (2010).

Customer Reviews

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By Regina M. Argueta-misra on February 17, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book was in great shape. Though not the seller's fault, the print is tiny and made it difficult to read. Otherwise, great resource.
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By Dre Vega on July 8, 2014
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Found everything I needed in the book!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sara Student on February 25, 2013
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This book is highly informative and helped me out tremendously in learning about British History/Literature; absolutely perfect for students required to learn about such things.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anonymous on November 14, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There was some writing in it but it met the specifications stated. It arrived at the maximum time frame allotted.
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