Not All Who Wander Are Lost

October 9, 2001 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
5:27
2
4:18
3
7:20
4
3:24
5
7:19
6
3:57
7
5:46
8
3:19
9
3:45
10
5:15
11
4:53
12
5:15


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 9, 2001
  • Release Date: October 9, 2001
  • Label: Sugar Hill Records
  • Copyright: (C) 2001 Sugar Hill Records, A Welk Music Group Company
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 59:58
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001F3FZLA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (83 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,173 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

All I will say is that it's a remarkable CD, and people who enjoy Nickel Creek will really love it.
Chel Micheline
This is a brilliant musician gifted beyond his years and everyone's music collection would be enriched by owning this album.
E. M. Canales
I have owned this CD for about a year and honestly it is the one record that still gets as much play time as any other CD.
Randall Westfall

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

80 of 83 people found the following review helpful By Steve Vrana HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on March 1, 2002
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I hadn't heard of Chris Thile when my college sophomore daughter asked me to get her a CD by Nickel Creek for her birthday. Upon investigating the band, I discovered it featured a now 21-year-old mandolin virtuoso. The title of this album was almost enough to make me go out and buy the CD, but when I saw it featured some of my favorite musicians (Bela Fleck, Jerry Douglas) I decided to take a chance. Wow! Not since David Grisman's debut twenty-five years ago have I heard such a stunning album. After several listens, it's obvious that Thile was influenced by Grisman as well as Tony Rice and of course Bela Fleck, who co-wrote "Riddles in the Dark." The other 11 compositions are all Thile originals. Thile's music takes the listener on a journey that explores the possiblities of traditional bluegrass instruments in a non-traditional setting. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Chel Micheline TOP 100 REVIEWER on May 22, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I got this CD, desperate for any new music similar to Nickel Creek. It's beautiful. I don't know much at all about bluegrass, except to say I don't consider myself much of a fan, so I won't try and make comparisons to other artists or wax philosophical about the details of Chris Thile's playing. All I will say is that it's a remarkable CD, and people who enjoy Nickel Creek will really love it. It's basically a CD full of the type of instrumentals on Nickel Creek's debut. If you are a NC fan hesitant to buy this because you're not sure you will like it, don't hesitate. It will be a great addition to your music collection.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 9, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Well, let me be the first to critique Chris Thile's new cd "Not All Who Wander Are Lost".
Simply put, it is a musical explosion. In this album, Chris displays his mandolin playing talent to the full extent. He along with the other superb musicians, including Bryan Sutton, Stuart Duncan, Jerry Douglas, and several others, come together to incorporate their talent and instrumentation on the all but one soley Thile written songs. The songs are unique and completely energy fused. Similar to the Nickel Creek sound, but truly unique. Bluegrass, Jazz, and Classical influences can be used to describe this album. If you are a hardcore bluegrass or country fan, this album will not please your appetite. Instead, it is much more an expression of a young man and his expression of music and sound. Another way to describe this cd is one BIG MUSICAL JAM. Some my favorites are: Song For A Young Queen, Raining at Sunset, Sinai to Canaan-part 1, Eureka, Big Sam Thompson, and Bridal Veil Falls.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Robert H. Woody on January 22, 2002
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
In "Not All Who Wander Are Lost," Chris Thile leaves no doubt about his being master of his instrument. He plays in a precise and controlled manner, eliciting tonal variations that most mandolinists probably do not know exist. His ensemble colleagues are peerless, e.g., Edgar Meyer (string bass), Bela Fleck (banjo), Stuart Duncan (fiddle), Jeff Coffin (woodwinds), Jerry Douglas (dobro), to name but a few. If the listener enjoys the work of Edgar Meyer--along with Yo-Yo Ma, Mark O'Connor, and cohorts--as evidenced in Meyer's "Appalachian Journey," then purchasing the Thile CD would be logical. If the listener, however, prefers: bluegrass mandolin, forget Thile's work and buy "Wires &Wood" by Johnny Staats; or an acoustic mandolin sound, purchase "Travellers" by Butch Baldassari, Robin Bullock, and John Reischman. Chris Thile is a remarkable talent, be it as a performer or composer (he composed all but one piece [and co-composed, with Bela Fleck. the only other piece]}. Thile's contribution to Nickel Creek is noteworthy, but his contribution to the development of mandolin music will surely be far greater.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Paul from Washington on April 28, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I have followed Newgrass for years and love players like Bela Fleck, Mark O'Connor and Jerry Douglas. I also love Jazz, classical and other forms of music. This has to be the best instrumental album I own.
Chris Thile is an absolute genius to me and his playing is as flawless as I could imagine on a mandolin. His accuracy and style make Ricky Skaggs, Sam Bush and others sound like they were hacks. His writings have a rich complexity about them, transcend the genre, and are as good as his playing. He is even better in person and he compares well to early concerts I saw with Mark O'Connor.
Don't worry if you are typically not a bluegrass fan, this is an instrumentalists dream album. The more I listen to it, the more I like it. I would only like to see him break out and play with some more non-bluegrass types. He might revolutionize some jazz genre's like he is doing with newgrass instrumentalists. If I were other bluegrass mandolinists I would not buy this album because it might force me to throw away my instrument.
Of course it only helps that he is playing with some of the best players in the world on this album. I only wish Mark O'Connor was on this. A duo album with Mark would be one for all time.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Kim A Miller on November 6, 2003
Format: Audio CD
I followed a short path to this album. After being turned on through Nickel Creek, I came to this album. I was stunned with the musicianship and energy of the compositions and the players. Chris is amazing, but so are his cohorts: Douglas, Fleck, Meyers, Duncan. But after listening to this album 50 times, I wanted more and began to check out the other works of his collaborators. From "Tales from the acoustic planet (Fleck)" to "Uncommon ritual (Meyers and Fleck)" to a half dozen others, I found much that is worthy, but nothing that compares. The mandolin is the best newgrass lead instrument and Chris is the master, His precision as a writer and arranger have no equal. This music is so life giving! The only thing that comes close is his previous albums ("Stealing second" with Douglas and Duncan)and Leading off.
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