Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Men's Hightops Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Fidlar $5 Off Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Shop Popular Services hog hog hog  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Nintendo Digital Games Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Deal of the Day

Customer Reviews

2
5 star
50%
4 star
50%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
Not Passion's Slave: Emotions and Choice (Passionate Life)
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$37.00+Free shipping with Amazon Prime

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on October 19, 2008
The late Robert Solomon is credited by philosophical friend and foe alike as pretty-much single-handedly rehabilitating the study of emotions in philosophy, with publication of his book The Passions in the early Seventies. This is probably true, though it does somewhat downplay how influential Kenny's earlier Action, Emotion and Will has been.
Recently, authors such as Paul Griffiths in his book What Emotions Really Are and Jesse Prinz (author of Gut Reactions) have singled out Solomon as the crudist of the cognitivist theorists of emotion. Is this fair? Well the honest answer based on a thorough reading of Solomon's corpus is sometimes yes and sometimes no! Yes, sometimes he does offer hostage to fortune by, on his own admission, wanting to be a radical in the philosophy of the emotions: arguing that we choose our emotions and that emotions ARE judgments.
No, in that he is quite clear in his later writings that the choice isn't straightforwardly under the individual's control and that the judgments which he claims constitute the emotion do not have to be propositional. His opponents fail to take on board these later qualifications.
This collection contains some of the late papers and anyone who knows Solomon purely via critics such as Griffiths and/or via his own early book, The Passsions, might well be surprised at the contents. OK, so he might still have provided a theory that is ultimately flawed, but he was moving in the right direction. And he cetainly was not the crude cognitivist found in the caricatures provided by critics. For sure, the arguments of 'cognitivists' have got more subtle recently (see for example Phil Hutchinson's Shame and Philosophy and Robert C. Roberts' Emotions). And Solomon did have a tendency to polemicise and play the radical; but he is essential reading for anyone interested in the subject.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on March 8, 2011
In college I took a course on existentialism taught by Bob. Bob was vibrant and passionate. I later chose him as my faculty adviser. He passed away a few years ago, having been one of the finest people I've ever met.

Bob's knowledge, intelligence, wit, and enthusiasm for life shine through all of his writings. I highly recommend him.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
The Passions: Emotions and the Meaning of Life
The Passions: Emotions and the Meaning of Life by Robert C. Solomon (Paperback - March 15, 1993)
$15.31

True To Our Feelings
True To Our Feelings by Robert C. Solomon (Paperback - February 1, 2001)
$12.30

Spirituality for the Skeptic: The Thoughtful Love of Life
Spirituality for the Skeptic: The Thoughtful Love of Life by Robert C. Solomon (Paperback - December 4, 2006)
$15.95
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.