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I'm Not a Plastic Bag Hardcover – April 25, 2012


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Hardcover, April 25, 2012
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten and up
  • Hardcover: 88 pages
  • Publisher: Boom Entertainment (April 25, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936393549
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936393541
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 8 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #564,002 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 3-6-Who would have thought that the Great Pacific Garbage Patch could evoke readers' sympathy? Allison personifies the floating accumulation of trash into a being filled with loneliness and longing. Among the plastic bags, bottles, and other debris, a used tire and windblown umbrella appear as eyes. Shifts in the floating morass open "mouths" that reveal words such as "come in" or "hello," the story's only text. Extensions from the edges of the garbage monster appear as overgrown hands, sometimes reaching down to a giant squid and other times pointing to the various messages. Meanwhile, more trash arrives from sea and sky, including the carcass of an albatross, dead after ingesting plastic. The puzzling ending has the entire mass rising skyward, followed by the monster's face shining in the night sky. The images themselves are arresting, providing multiple perspectives from above, below, and on the surface of the floating mass of trash. Allison's work might serve as a discussion starter to lead in to the information pages about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, endangered species, and ways individuals can help reduce ocean pollution. Environmentalist Jeff Corwin's introduction explains the problem's magnitude. Loree Burns's Tracking Trash (Houghton, 2007) explains how scientists study ocean currents and the movement of debris and includes photos of garbage patches. Ted Kooser's Bag in the Wind (Candlewick, 2010) combines text and illustrations to follow the multiple owners and uses of a single plastic bag.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankatoα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

About the Author

Rachel Hope Allison earned her MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City in 2009. She now works as an illustrator and with several non-profit organizations in online organizing and fundraising. She currently lives in Brooklyn, NY, dodges hipsters and babies on the way to the subway, works, draws, reads, and generally plays way too much Rockband.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ari on May 1, 2012
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Before I learned about this book, I had only some vague notions of what the Great Pacific Garbage Patch might be. I knew there was some garbage out in the ocean and I knew it was big and gross, and that's all I knew. After I ordered the book, I went to Wikipedia and read about the Patch, and I learned that it was in fact big and gross. OK, fine, I figured, whatever.

Then I read the book.

It's one thing to read about something like the Garbage Patch on Wikipedia or wherever, to stare blankly at the statistics that describe its size and depth and so forth. Then you know. All well and good. But this book isn't about knowing, it's about feeling. The artwork reaches straight past the logical part of your brain and right down to your heart. By the end of the story, you don't *know* more about the Patch than you did before. But you *feel*. You feel the hopeful patience of the ocean, the sad acceptance of the fish and the birds, even -- especially -- the sublime grotesque that is the Garbage Patch itself.

You might think that a book about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch would try to make the reader feel guilt or shame. Not this book. This is no mere preachy fable. It is the illustrator's genius that when you close the book, what remains is not the feeling of condemnation for participation in the system that created the Patch. No, as the last page is turned, the reader feels an expected surge of hope, a feeling that we, the ones who made this awful thing, we who have unleashed it upon the fish and the birds and the sea and the world, it is we who can, we who must, remove it from the face of the planet.

This book is a rare treasure. The illustrator's passion for nature and for life call out to the reader from every page, from every line.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jessica Gonzales on April 30, 2012
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This is a beautifully illustrated book about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Although it doesn't have any words, there is a definite, touching story and the book is full of little details that carry through the storyline and are fun to follow. I love that the story brings awareness to environmental issues without (in my opinion) being overly moralizing, and I also appreciate the extra information provided in the front and the back of the book about what sort of trash makes up the garbage patch and what we can do to help. And the publisher has arranged to have two trees planted for each tree used in making the book!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Pink Parrot on May 2, 2012
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This book is phenomenal. The author's portrayal of the Pacific Garbage Patch makes one think about how many individual beings this human-created waste affects. I love the end of the book...but you will have to "read" it for yourself to see what happens!
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Carolyn Shargel on February 10, 2013
I got this book for my 6th grade granddaughter who is very interested in the environment. I was under the impression that it was a graphic novel. Instead all of the drawings have no words to accompany them and the explanation is all at the end of the book.
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