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Not Your Parents' Money Book: Making, Saving, and Spending Your Own Money Paperback – August 10, 2010


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Not Your Parents' Money Book: Making, Saving, and Spending Your Own Money + Growing Money: A Complete Investing Guide for Kids + The Everything Kids' Money Book: Earn it, save it, and watch it grow!
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Grade Level: 5 - 9
  • Lexile Measure: 1030L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers; 1 edition (August 10, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416994726
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416994725
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #239,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 5 Up–Written in a light, somewhat jocular tone and sprinkled with amusing but eye-opening and conversation-starting quotes from 12-, 13-,and 14-year-olds, this book is sure to hold readers' attention. The content includes how you get money, via allowances and jobs, and notes the difference between cash-only and paychecks. Tracking typical teen expenditures, both long-term and short, is juxtaposed against keeping money in checking, savings, and money-market accounts. Parents' cash flow, adult salaries, and costs of goods such as minivans are all touched upon. As the young people's quotes make clear, they have both funny and inaccurate understandings in this area. The concepts are presented simply enough for the middle school crowd, but are just as important for older teens, especially when it comes to a breakdown of deductions on a paycheck and thinking about investing for college savings. There is a section on smart shopping and credit cards. Fascinating facts include the history of the development of money from cows to cowrie shells to coins and paper, as well as such tidbits as the fact that germs in mucus can live on bills from 10 to 17 days. Chatzky's presentation is engaging, with a lengthy glossary at the back and all the words highlighted throughout the text. Cartoons appear on almost every page, adding humor and some additional material. Critical information is provided to keep young people from being taken advantage of financially, such as how to avoiding overdraft fees on a checking account. Overall, the healthy financial attitude of only-spend-what-you-have is promoted throughout the book.Meredith Toumayan, The Governor's Academy, Byfield, MA
© Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

Personal-finance specialist Chatzky’s first book for youth offers a mélange of financial information that will encourage young people to develop financial independence, self-reliance, and responsibility. The casual, chatty prose, peppered with trivia and quizzes, accessibly conveys economic concepts such as inflation, stock market terms, and investment options. Also included is a “wants and needs” chart to support saving goals, as well as suggestions for raising allowances and researching charities. The target readership is sometimes unclear; information on filing taxes electronically, for example, may lack resonance for the younger end of the book’s audience. Additionally, statistics are sometimes unsourced, as in charts citing average job wages. Chatzky does offer job ideas that move beyond babysitting into more contemporary notions, such as “iPod installer,” but specifics about how to actually apply for a job or start a business are not included. Still, the inviting approach and sidebars with intriguing facts, such as how money carries germs, may pique kids’ interest in the topic. Appendixes include a brief history of money and how it’s made, a glossary, and Web resources. Grades 6-9. --Shelle Rosenfeld

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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I would recommend for a parent or an educator.
loves2cook
Great information even for adults who have missed out on the financial knowledge that is needed in our current society.
Erma M. Edwards
The book is peppered with questions from kids and her answers to their questions.
Nancy L. Kvamme

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Julie A. Capozzoli on November 1, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I liked this book because, as my 11 year old son and I were reading it together, I realized how little he actually knew about wages, credit, debt, investing, spending, saving...and they don't really teach this in schools. After a few chapters, he asked me to keep reading because he was truly interested in all these subjects. It has started a long and productive discussion about money that I'm sure we will continue for many years. I would definitely recommend this to tweens and teens.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Yana V. Rodgers on November 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
The financial crisis that dragged the U.S. economy into a deep recession and had spillover effects around the world continues to dominate the headlines. Much debate has focused on finding ways to reduce the damage today and prevent a similar meltdown from happening in the future. Empowering our youth with financial literacy constitutes an important strategy that has begun to receive attention in the media.

In explaining concepts like recession, unemployment, and debt in engaging and clear terms, Not Your Parents' Money Book fills this niche and helps young readers gain more familiarity with their own roles as savers, consumers, and workers. Added to the mix are some humorous vignettes to keep the readers' attention, such as the life span of the germs that pass from people to dollar bills, and the incidence of and punishment for counterfeiting money.

In writing this book, author Jean Chatzky, the financial editor for the Today show and frequent contributor to other talk shows and media sources, drew on her expertise in personal finance as well as research from a series of focus group interviews with middle school students. The result is an easy-to-read crash course in economics and finance that will encourage readers to become savvier consumers and more informed about the economic world around them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Erma M. Edwards on September 23, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great information even for adults who have missed out on the financial knowledge that is needed in our current society. Geared for the young teenager, I found the drawings and illustrations likely more acceptable to the 12 yr old than the 17 yr old even through the narrative is appropriate for all. This is a shame as the older teenagers likely missed out and need to read it also.
This could be used as a text for homeschooling and appropriate high school classes.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nancy L. Kvamme on July 30, 2011
Format: Paperback
I have read a number of books written by [...]Jean Chatzky and was excited to see she has written a book about money for teenagers, "Not Your Parents' Money Book". Jean is the financial editor for the Today show and frequent contributor to other talk shows and media sourcres.

As part of the research for the book, she met with groups of kids at middle schools across the country and them questions about what they know about money and things they want to know about money. The book is peppered with questions from kids and her answers to their questions. Also included in the book are fun facts and quizzes about money.

There are chapters about earning money, spending money and saving money. She gives ideas of ways to earn money besides the regular babysitting and cutting lawns and discusses the different vehicles for saving the money you earn.

She also discusses and explains investing and ways to invest. Many of the money related words are highlighted in the book and defined in the glossary at the end of the book. So if there are words that you do not understand you can jump to the glossary and look it up. She also discusses the economy and recession, which may be words that kids hear about and may not know what they mean.

Also included in the end of the book are sections on the history of money and how money is made.

The book is concluded by a list of web resources for more information. The websites include informational websites as well as websites that have games and puzzles pertaining to money and finances.

As with other topics it may be easier for kids to learn if they do not think they are actually learning anything, making it fun to learn.

This is a great resource to teach kids about the important subject of dealing with money and finances. It is about 150 pages and a quick and easy read.
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