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Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff between Privacy and Security Hardcover – May 31, 2011


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Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff between Privacy and Security + Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life (Stanford Law Books) + Understanding Privacy
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (May 31, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300172311
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300172317
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #841,001 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"[A] thought-provoking, accessible introduction to privacy and security law."—J.M. Keller, Choice
(J.M. Keller Choice)

"A very timely and thought provoking book."—Raymond G. Kessler, The Law and Politics Book Review
(Raymond G. Kessler The Law and Politics Book Review)

Nothing to Hide is a potent and sobering tonic that provides an invaluable antidote to the sort of panicked rhetoric that makes privacy and civil liberties into antiquated relics at best, handmaidens of al Qaeda at worst.”—The Daily
(The Daily)

“Daniel Solove takes on the two biggest challenges to privacy in the twenty-first century:  the rapid development of technology that gives the government the ability to track our decisions, choices, discussions, and movements in real time; and the threat of catastrophic terrorist attacks, which demand increased security measures.  In clear, measured prose, Solove shows how the law of privacy has failed us in addressing these twin challenges, and proposes an innovative way forward.”—David Cole, Georgetown University Law School

(David Cole 2011-02-15)

 “The Information Age has turned our notions of privacy upside down.  Solove is our smartest thinker on what privacy means today, and "Nothing to Hide" definitely refutes old ideas about privacy and replaces them with ones that work in the world of data brokers, Facebook, and Wikileaks.  The debate will never be the same after this book.”—Bruce Schneier, author of Applied Cryptography

(Bruce Schneier 2011-02-15)

“Daniel Solove is one of America's leading experts on privacy law. In this engaging book, he explains why privacy is everyone's concern; it is a crucial social value that must be integrated into our national security policy rather than simply balanced against it.”—Jack M. Balkin, Yale Law School

(Jack Balkin 2011-02-21)

"Bravo Daniel Solove! In Nothing to Hide he skillfully dispels many of the myths associated with the faulty zero-sum tradeoff between privacy vs. security. In exposing the flawed logic of having to forego one interest in order to secure another, Daniel Solove has done us all a great service."— Dr. Ann Cavoukian, Information and Privacy Commissioner, Ontario, Canada (Ann Cavoukian 2011-04-11)

"Incidents that raise questions about online security and privacy rights are a common occurrence. Books about these issues are equally plentiful, but none that I have seen addresses the issue in more detail or with greater insight than this work by Daniel Solove."—Mayer Nudell, Security Management (Mayer Nudell Security Management)

About the Author

Daniel J. Solove is John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School.

More About the Author

Daniel J. Solove is the John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School and an internationally-known expert in privacy law. He is the founder of TeachPrivacy, http://teachprivacy.com, a company that provides privacy and data security training.

To find out more about his work and to download many of his writings, go to http://danielsolove.com.

Solove is the author of 9 books, including the leading textbook on information privacy law. He has published with Harvard University Press and Yale University Press, among others, and his books have been translated into many languages. Solove has published more than 50 articles and essays, which have appeared in leading law reviews such as the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, Stanford Law Review, Columbia Law Review, California Law Review, Michigan Law Review, NYU Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, and Duke Law Journal.

Professor Solove is co-reporter on the American Law Institute Restatement of Information Privacy Principles. He has testified before Congress and has been interviewed and featured in several hundred media broadcasts and articles, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Associated Press, Time, Newsweek, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, and NPR. His work has been cited by many courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court.

A graduate of Yale Law School, he clerked for Judge Stanley Sporkin, U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia and Judge Pamela Ann Rymer, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit.

Professor Solove teaches information privacy law, criminal procedure, criminal law, and law and literature.

He is a LinkedIn "Influencer" and blogs at http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/articles/2259773

Customer Reviews

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This is a very informative and interesting book.
C. Galas
What may have once looked like a vague interest in disease now crystallizes into a relative certainty that the person has, or knows someone, with cancer.
Frank A. Pasquale III
Most of us have wondered how well the law protects our privacy, given the rapid pace at which new technologies have emerged over the past few decades.
Jim McGaw

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Frank A. Pasquale III on May 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover
It's hard to get people to care about privacy and technology. Defeatism and denial are all too common. There is a bipartisan consensus for an expanding surveillance state. Some argue that good people don't need privacy: if you've got nothing to hide, why worry about governments or businesses looking through your business? Daniel J. Solove's new book, Nothing to Hide, shatters that myth. This book reaffirms the value of privacy, shows how endangered it is, and proposes real solutions.

So why should you worry about privacy, even if you've got "nothing to hide?" First, in an era of rampant overcriminalization, it's hard to know if you really are "clean." Recall Cardinal Richelieu's famous line, "If you give me six lines written by the hand of the most honest of men, I will find something in them which will hang him." Moreover, Solove shows that the "nothing to hide" caucus misunderstands privacy as merely a problem of an individual trying to conceal something they don't want others to know. What we really should be thinking about is a process of aggregation of data, where our lives become an open book for those powerful or rich enough to demand our profiles. Solove gives the example of a person buying a book on cancer, and a few weeks later purchasing a wig. What may have once looked like a vague interest in disease now crystallizes into a relative certainty that the person has, or knows someone, with cancer. Like tiny tiles fitted into a mosaic, any particular piece of data may not say all that much. But when they are put together, they can deeply influence how a person is perceived, and ultimately, how they are treated.

Solove's most striking contribution is to show us that the dichotomy between privacy and security is often a false one.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Solove has done it again: a fascinating and important work on privacy and national security that leaves no stone unturned and grips the reader with laugh-our-loud moments. Nothing to Hide highlights the stakes in our national security agenda with serious insight and deep analysis. Solove takes apart the arguments and assumptions animating current surveillance efforts, and in a story-telling style, helps us appreciate the full range of their costs and benefits. Solove gives us a set of tools to understand and critically assess emerging technologies of surveillance like the TSA body scans, fusion centers, and the like. A must read!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By mnomalley on May 30, 2011
Format: Hardcover
As the Patriot Act recently obtained extended life and national discussion again (this time very briefly) focused on security, we as a nation appeared prepared to accept the loss of privacy as a necessary price to pay for our safety. If you read Solove's fine work you will see that security and privacy are not mutually exclusive: there are sensible ways to have it both ways -- increased security while preserving what we have always considered to be among our basic rights, privacy. Solove influentially dispenses with superficial cocktail party arguments and shows us that there is too much at stake to too easily sacrifice a cherished value of a democratic society.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jim McGaw on August 1, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Most of us have wondered how well the law protects our privacy, given the rapid pace at which new technologies have emerged over the past few decades. Daniel J. Solove is a law professor who clearly understands privacy law, and its implications (and shortcomings) regarding the Internet. He is, without a doubt, one of the best writers we have on the subject. His writing style is lucid, easy-to-read, and free of legal jargon.

Privacy is a big issue online these days, but I don't think the era of Facebook, Google, and iPhones is going to be rolled back any time soon. It shouldn't be, and we shouldn't exhaust ourselves demanding that the companies behind these products respect our privacy. The forward march of technology might be inevitable, but the erosion of how well the law affords privacy protection for each citizen's online activity is far from deterministic. We can still work to enact legislation that will protect all of us. And I'd argue that we should.

Daniel Solove has written a brilliant introductory guide to this area of the law. I'd recommend this book to anyone interested in online privacy law. If you've ever been even remotely curious about your rights regarding your own digital footprints, buy it now.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shannon M on October 16, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Absolutely fascinating content! Used one of the chapters within my high school English class. Had my students read one of the sections and it sparked a great debate!
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By Dave on July 1, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very readable book on privacy, and not a repetition of what you have heard before.
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