Nothing If Not Critical: Essays on Art and Artists and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.00
  • Save: $5.70 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 20 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Standard Used Condition
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Nothing If Not Critical: Selected Essays on Art and Artists Paperback – February 1, 1992


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.30
$5.98 $0.67
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Nothing If Not Critical: Selected Essays on Art and Artists + The Shock of the New
Price for both: $52.59

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

$50 Amazon.com Gift Card
Receive up to a $50 Amazon.com Gift Card for Fine Art Purchases. Restrictions apply, see offer for details.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (February 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 014016524X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140165241
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #114,202 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Time 's art critic assesses four centuries of Western art.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

This collection brings together over 90 essays, many of which have already appeared in major journals. Hughes considers the Masters, 19th-century art and artists, the Modernist spirit, American and European painters, and contemporary artists in prose that is historically informative, understandable, witty, and often opinionated. Perhaps most interesting is Hughes's introduction, a recognition and partial analysis of New York City's decline as the center of the art world. This well-written, thought-provoking collection will appeal to most who find art and the art world important and entertaining. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 4/1/90.
- Jean Keleher, Wally Findlay Galleries, Chicago
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Robert Hughes was born in Australia in 1938 and has lived in Europe and the United States since 1964. Since 1970 he has worked in New York as an art critic for Time Magazine. He has twice received the Franklin Jeweer Mather Award for Distinguished Criticism from the College Art Association of America.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 17 customer reviews
The author's turn of phrase is clever and entertaining.
Lamppu
Hughes takes the entire history of art and gives a critical analysis that is at once brilliant, humorous, and economical.
Amazon Customer
The articles on Warhol and Basquiat, as well as the one on the NY art scene, are brilliant.
Reich Claude

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

56 of 57 people found the following review helpful By G. Bestick VINE VOICE on February 19, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This collection of magazine reviews and essays, first published in 1990, serves as a short course in the development of American and European art over the last few centuries. The eye is keen, the mind is thoroughly grounded in art history and tradition, and the writing is lucid and provocative. Hughes wrote the magazine pieces while working as the art critic for Time Magazine. They tend to be triggered by major exhibitions of modern artists or major retrospectives of dead ones. Hughes always starts from the work, and deals with the constricted space of the magazine format by isolating something essential about an artist: DeKooning's draftsmanship; Hopper's despair held in abeyance; Pisarro's decency; Pollock as aesthete instead of wild cowboy; the mismatch between Rothko's intellectual aims and artistic strategies. Sandwiched between whiskey ads and the pimping of NBC's new sitcom, Hughes' magazine reviews demonstrate an admirable ability to dissect major paintings and analyze artists without talking down to Time's mass audience.

The longer essays first appeared in venues such as The New York Review of Books and The New Republic. In these pieces, Hughes lets his critical and rhetorical capabilities off the leash. The opening essay gives us Hughes' take on the 1980s New York art scene, which Hughes saw as a "low, dishonest decade," for several interrelated reasons. First, the art being produced did not serve or surpass the modernist tradition that preceded it; for Hughes, all serious art must grapple with what came before it, and figure out how to move beyond it. ("An artist's every action is judged by an unwearying tribunal of the dead.") Intelligent evaluation of the work produced by emerging artists became supplanted by hype.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Reich Claude on April 1, 2007
Format: Paperback
Either you love Robert Hughes or you hate Robert Hughes. I consider him the greatest art critic alive and his insights on XX century art are irreplaceable pieces of wit and culture.

This book is a sum of most of the author's articles published in Time Magazine and other medias and covers old masters as well as modern and contemporary artists.The articles on Warhol and Basquiat, as well as the one on the NY art scene, are brilliant. I bought this book when it came out and rereading it recently I saw how utterly modern it still is, considering today's art world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
36 of 43 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
I don't know much about art and I'm not even sure I know what I like. But it's obvious that this book is intelligently - and honestly - written, and I'm writing this review mainly to recommend the book to other people who aren't terribly interested in the visual arts. Hughes has made me think more highly of painting in general and made me re-evaluate much of what I thought about the twentieth century. (Don't worry: he also confirmed much of it.) He isn't at all afraid to announce that the emperor has no clothes - so on those occasions when he confirms that the emperor is, in fact, fully dressed, I am much more inclined to believe him.
Wittily written, too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Augusto Balossino on March 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
An exceedingly thorough, yet entertaining, historical account of great painters of the past as well as of contemporary artists.

Hughes is candid and not influenced by traditional art critique; thus in many cases he offers a new way of looking at painters and paintings.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Jackson, Jr. on February 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Everything the late Mr. Hughes has to say is razor sharp and true.

The major problem with this book is the SIZE OF THE TEXT, which is minuscule to the point of being straining, and the terrible quality of the paper on which it's printed.

I miss him already and as an artist I only wish he were still here to critique and correct the ludicrous state of today's art "scene". There are many days of the year that reading a few words from Robert Hughes is the only thing that gets me to work.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Poka on January 7, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
You may disagree with Hughes (I bristled at his dismissal of Chagall as "kitschy") but you won't be bored. In fact, his comments are brief, just a couple of pages, but offer novel insights. Example: His essay on Gaugain's search for the primitive-- ie: his transplant to Tahiti, in fact had its roots much earlier in his career during his years in Brittany. He is persuasive in tracing this particular connection.
In addition, he does not spoon-feed the information, he demands some background knowledge, but then makes incisive comments that reward the effort of grasping his points.
After stumbling on to the book in the library, I decided to buy it. A definite keeper.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ellery Green on June 14, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An introduction to many artists with whom I was unfamiliar. The brief histories helped provide background. His critique of Tom Wolfe was accurate, but exhibited a lack of familiarity with European Modernism. As Peter Smithson said "Modern Architecture never crossed the Atlantic." Walter Gropius did have a more ilarger impact on architectural practice than on his students. I was delighted to find that I shared the author's view of "banal glass boxes. After reading The Power of Art I really appreciated reading another perspective on the same artists. My understanding of Van Gogh's work was improved and revised markedly after reading both authors. It was frustrating to not have the artists' work before me while reading, especially with works I have never seen. I look forward to reading more of Robert Hughes's work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?