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Now You See Her Hardcover – February 27, 2007


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An Ember in the Ashes
"An Ember in the Ashes"
When Laia’s brother is arrested for treason, Laia is forced to make a decision. In exchange for help from rebels who promise to rescue her brother, she will risk her life to spy for them from within the Empire’s greatest military academy.Learn more | More in Teen and Young Adult
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An Ember in the Ashes
"An Ember in the Ashes"
When Laia’s brother is arrested for treason, Laia is forced to make a decision. In exchange for help from rebels who promise to rescue her brother, she will risk her life to spy for them from within the Empire’s greatest military academy.Learn more | More in Teen and Young Adult

Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 800L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTeen; First Edition first Printing edition (March 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061116831
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061116834
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,063,961 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 7–10—Who is she—Hope Shay or Bernadette Romano? Kidnapping victim or manipulative schemer? Mitchard pulls out all the stops in this psychological thriller about a 15-year-old Michigan actress (stage name, Hope) who attends the elite Starwood Academy for the Performing Arts. Despite the jealousy of her fellow students, Hope seems to be thriving and has landed the starring role in the student production of Romeo and Juliet. She has also fallen deeply in love with her own Romeo, actor Logan Rose. In fact, they plan to get some money together and live in L.A. or New York City as soon as she's 16. But something goes terribly wrong, and suddenly everyone suspects Hope of faking her own abduction and fabricating her romance. Peeling the layers of her story away reveals the truth in bits and pieces, and the ambiguous conclusion feels absolutely realistic. This riveting page-turner is sure to be in hot demand.—Susan Riley, Mount Kisco Public Library, NY
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

In journal entries chronicling her first year at an arts high school, 15-year-old Hope, an ambitious actress who sees herself as "a dark-skinned Gwyneth Whatever-Her-Name-Is," pleads with readers to judge her recent misdeed--a faked abduction--as the misguided act of an exploited ingenue. From Hope's passionate, sexual affair with her male lead in Romeo and Juliet to the betrayal that foils their ransom-collecting plot, it all sounds like something out of a teen-targeted Hollywood thriller. Soon enough, though, Mitchard opens telling chinks in Hope's account, ultimately revealing her protagonist's struggle with very real psychotic delusions. As in Chris Lynch's Inexcusable (2005), the intended and unintended disclosures of an unreliable narrator are fascinating, although the therapy situation that concludes Hope's story feels preachy and contrived. Even so, Mitchard's first YA effort will earn many fans, who will enjoy teasing apart the truth from self-serving bluster while connecting Hope's experience with timely questions about societal obsession with fame. Jennifer Mattson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Customer Reviews

Hope Shay's story, told from her point of view, is sad and uplifting and equally impossible to put down.
Holly Kennedy
Stepping inside the mind of Hope Shay will take you on a journey that is personal, insightful, heartbreaking and eventually, full of Hope.
Sally Anne Funk
All of her characters are realistic, and quite possibly live next door to you - maybe even in your own home.
Susan Reading

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo on March 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover
NOW YOU SEE HER is an amazingly realistic look into the life of a self-centered girl who has been showered with attention from her parents all of her life. Bernadette, or Hope, her stage name, dreams of being a famous actress--and she is willing to do anything to get to the top. Her mother has always pushed her so hard, and now her mother's dreams for Hope are her own. Hope knows she's the best and explains that her lack of friends is simply because everyone is jealous of her talent. At fourteen, she is accepted into Starwood Academy, a prestigious acting school in Michigan. Hope is sure that this is where her career will take off, and she doesn't mind in the least that she is a bit of an outcast. After all, she has Logan. Logan Rose. The most amazing boy she has ever met. Hope finds herself lost in her infatuation with Logan. Everything in her life revolves around their budding romance.

The two of them formulate a plan, a plan to elope when Logan graduates. Their plan requires one thing, money, which they plan to extract from Hope's parents by faking her abduction. Faking a kidnapping is risky business, but Hope is willing to do anything for Logan, anything for their future together. Hope dreams of the day when the two of them will be winning Academy Awards together, the perfect couple.

Hope's story is told through her own eyes, and I felt every emotion with her. I felt the pride in her triumphs as well as the pain of feeling lost and confused, like you are the only one who knows the truth. But it is only at the end, when the real truth is finally revealed, that you realize that Hope Shay is not all that she appears to be.

Reviewed by: Amber Gibson
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jules on February 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
A friend recommended this book to me after reading it and I couldn't have disagreed more with this choice. SPOILERS******** I found the narrator to be thoroughly unlikable. Very soon into reading it, I realized that half of what was going on was a delusion. I said to my friend, Hope is psycho affective or in some delusional state- this isn't really happening. A few twists "got me" but even they were disappointing. Mainly, I was stunned by the diagnosis of "borderline personality disorder". The only accuracy to this was that there is no medication that can treat that disorder, however those suffering from BPD do not make up people or situations; the closest resemblance to this is by saying that they tend to misconstrue social situations and are plagued by obsessive and/or negative thoughts. Truly, BPD is most closely linked to a form of manic depression and sufferers experience mixed episodes and rapid mood swings. It is a MOOD disorder, a PERSONALITY disorder. Hope suffers from fugue states, hallucinations, and psychosis. She is psychotic, bordering on schizophrenic. As they say in Seinfeld, not that there's anything wrong with that, but let's call a spade a spade and a psychotic a psychotic. I don't understand why there are so many positive reviews for this; I can't recall the last time I felt I had so thoroughly wasted my time reading a book. In the end, Hope doesn't seem any better off than when she began and I found her to be an incredibly unsympathetic character. I would not recommend this book at all. Save yourself some time and read Girl, Interrupted instead.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Teen Reads on June 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover
To Hope Shay (real name: Bernadette Romano, which just won't cut it in Hollywood), Romeo and Juliet is more than just a school production. It's life. Only a sophomore, Hope has scored the part of Juliet, a role that makes her the envy of all the upperclassmen. And why shouldn't she be envied? She has a special talent for acting, a way to make characters come to life. Her talent is what got her into the famed Starwood Academy, a prep school for fine arts students, and it's what makes a film actor named Logan Rose fall in love with her.

Hope's mother calls it The Gift. The Gift is what gets Hope the lead in a production of Annie and some spots in TV commercials. It makes Hope different from other kids --- more mature, more ambitious --- but a side effect of this difference is that she has no friends. At Starwood, she believes, people will be more like her. Instead of thinking she's stuck-up for having an agent, they'll admire her and talk acting with her. Or so she hopes.

What a tangled web we weave, when we first practice to deceive.

Life imitates art as Hope tells a story of falling in love with her (onstage and real-life) Romeo, Logan. They have to keep their romance a secret for many reasons, so Hope becomes consumed with their clandestine meetings. Together, they make what Hope calls The Plan. They'll move to L.A. or New York, waiting tables and auditioning for the roles that will make them stars, and then get married. The Plan, however, starts to crumble when Logan asks the question that engenders The Idea: "What would you say your parents think you're worth?"

The Idea is for Logan and Hope to fake Hope's kidnapping and get about $20,000 in ransom money from Hope's parents, enough for them to start on The Plan.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Susan Reading on March 8, 2007
Format: Hardcover
What if everything that was part of a "normal" adolescence - parental conflict, cliques in school, crushes, lack of self-esteem, fantasizing about becoming famous, loneliness - was magnified 1000 times? There is a very fine line between being IN control and LOSING control, and "Now You See Her" tells a story that's a perfect example of a young actress who loses control of her life.

Hope Shay seems to have it all, but no one, least of all her parents, has a clue as to what's going on inside her head. And because she is really battling her problems alone, and speaking directly to you, the reader, you are immediately drawn into the tale. You'll dislike her, you'll pity her, you'll commiserate with her. At first glance, none of these characters are very likeable, or easy to feel sympathy for, yet, as you read further, you will find yourself caught in an ever darkening, swirling vortex, and realize there is nothing Hope can do, until she crashes and burns.

Hope tries to act the part for her overbearing mother, wearing face cream to bed and always aware of who might be looking at her. When the pressures of school, rehearsals, appearances, and expectations clash together, she is overwhelmed, and starts her spiral into a black hole. Ms. Mitchard writes in a way that makes us want to keep reading. All of her characters are realistic, and quite possibly live next door to you - maybe even in your own home. Something isn't quite right, but you can't quite put your finger on it, until it is too late for Hope, and her secrets are revealed. I was reminded of Shirley Jackson's "We Have Always Lived in the Castle" because such a melancholy story can still urge you to keep reading on.

This is a book that should be read by parents AND teens, and then discussed and examined.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Jacquelyn Mitchard was born in Chicago. Her first novel, The Deep End of the Ocean, was published in 1996, becoming the first selection of the Oprah Winfrey Book Club and a number one New York Times bestseller. Eight other novels, four children's books and six young adult novels followed, including The Midnight Twins, Still Summer, All We Know of Heaven, and The Breakdown Lane. A former daily newspaper reporter, Mitchard now is a contributing editor for Parade Magazine, and frequently writes for such publications as More magazine and Real Simple. Her essays and short stories have been widely anthologized. An adjunct professor in the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program at Fairfield University, she lives in Wisconsin with her husband and their nine children

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