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Nuclear Madness: What You Can Do Library Binding – June 26, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-1439509265 ISBN-10: 1439509263 Edition: Reprint

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Product Details

  • Library Binding
  • Publisher: Paw Prints 2008-06-26; Reprint edition (June 26, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1439509263
  • ISBN-13: 978-1439509265
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,816,390 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This revised edition of Caldicott's 1978 polemic against nuclear power examines the dangers posed by the nuclear power industries of the 1990s.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Helen Caldicott is an internationally recognized antinuclear activist, cofounder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, and founder of the Women’s Action for Nuclear Disarmament and the International Physicians to Save the Environment. She lives in Australia. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

2.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By M. G. Clark on November 28, 2007
Format: Paperback
I once had the opportunity to see Helen speak. It was a lecture at the university of Guelph, some years ago. I thought it strange that she would constantly cite herself often and referred good intelligent questions back to "just read my book". So I did, and was disappointed. While intelligent I feel that she missed some of the larger physical concepts of nuclear power. I skip the physics lecture here but she does have quite a few contradictory points. Granted it was written by an intelligent medical doctor for the public and not by a physicist for graduate physics students. However I fear that she gives an entirely bias view of the subject. She fails to mention other vectors for transport of radioactive material, and entirely blames the nuclear industry. One omission that jumps to mind is the large number of unstable elements trapped inside coal beds, released into our atmosphere by the burning of coal. This one drove me nuts because if we are to rid our atmosphere of these agents then we must switch off coal. Sadly right now the only alternative to major power output is nuclear. Anyways I recommended the read if you want a intro to the debate but please don't take it as the only argument in one of the largest issues to face us and our children. To the students out there this is more nuclear energy 101 then a comprehensive advanced topics class. Much is skimmed over and nothing raised is without debate.

Cheers,
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. Crossley on March 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
What an awful pile of clap trap. I suggest that Ms Caldicott educate herself in the fields of physics and radiation as this is clearly lacking. As a physicist who has worked in both the nuclear energy and medical radiation fields, it appears to me that Ms Caldicott skirts around any factual evidence as this would disprove her contradictory arguments and instead wishes to engender scare politics and mass hysteria.

I am very disappointed that any publisher would agree to publish this without adequate research. One can only assume that their knowledge of physics is also extremely lacking.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Severin Olson on May 13, 2010
Format: Paperback
Fear mongering and hysteria are strong words to use when describing a book, but they accurately apply to Helen Caldicott's 'Nuclear Madness'. She informs us, among other things, that a power plant disaster is imminent, likely to take hundreds, even thousands, of lives. Cities such as Denver may even now need be evacuated due to radioactive contamination. While they have been unable to build any new plants in decades, the powerful nuclear industry 'controls' our lives. Finally, it may be too late for any corrective action. Is there any up side to nuclear power? None of any kind, we hear.

There are several advantages and disadvantages to this kind of energy. It is all worth a healthy debate. Nuclear waste, accidents and contamination are all serious concerns. But it should be clear to everyone that we need all the energy we can get. Solar and wind can only generate a tiny amount. So we would do well to cut out the fear and hysteria.
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful By R. E Westgard on September 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
This depicts Three Mile Island as though it was a realization of the movie "China Syndrome".
Actually no one was killed or injured. The only injuries occured when lawyers rushing to file lawsuits bumped into people at the Harrisburg airport. Radiation release was trivial.
All the lawsuits were eventually thrown out of court.
The meltdown catastrophe she describes didn't even penetrate the primary containment vessel.
Nuclear energy will be crucial as we confront declining supplies of oil and natural gas.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Robert Montagne on May 12, 2011
Format: Paperback
In the aftermath of Fukushima Dai-Ichi , Helen Caldicott looks prescient. The naysayers of this book look like fools who rushed to judgment.
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