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224 of 235 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must-Read Regardless of Your Age
First I should say that I work in a bookstore. Since I hadn't read a young adult book in nearly 30 years, I decided to read a few to learn what to recommend to customers. The first one I picked up was `Number the Stars.' It blew me away.
Lowry has written an incredibly moving account of the Jews in World War II Denmark. Annemarie Johansen worries what might...
Published on January 9, 2003 by A. Wolverton

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35 of 46 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting
Number The Stars

Number The Stars is about Annemarie Johansen and the rest of her family. Annemarie is an outgoing fun 10-year-old girl living in Copenhagen, Denmark with her family in the year 1943. The Nazi's have invaded Denmark. One day all the synagogues in Copenhagen and the rest of Denmark were shut down as part of the Nazi's plan to "relocate" all of...
Published on March 26, 2006 by Class 15


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224 of 235 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must-Read Regardless of Your Age, January 9, 2003
By 
A. Wolverton (Crofton, MD United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
First I should say that I work in a bookstore. Since I hadn't read a young adult book in nearly 30 years, I decided to read a few to learn what to recommend to customers. The first one I picked up was `Number the Stars.' It blew me away.
Lowry has written an incredibly moving account of the Jews in World War II Denmark. Annemarie Johansen worries what might happen to her Jewish friend Ellen Rosen as the Nazis capture and "relocate" all Jews. During this time, Annemarie learns about the power of evil, the strength of family, and the unbreakable bonds of friendship. Lowry does a masterful job of showing how Annemarie grows up before our very eyes in the way she interacts with her little sister Kirsti, her friend Ellen, and the ever present Nazi officers. Annemarie learns several lessons throughout the book that she'll never forget. We won't forget them either.
This is an incredibly moving book. There are very few books that absolutely everyone should read. This is one of them.
137 pages
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89 of 96 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a must read book, March 30, 2000
By 
This story is set in Denmark in 1943, during World War II. During that time Denmark was under Nazi occupation. The story tells about the life of two very close friends, Annemarie Johansen and Ellen Rosen, and their families. Living in Denmark during that time was very difficult. Nazi soldiers were on every street corner. There were food shortages and they were required to darken their windows every evening. One day, the Jewish families received word that the Germans were going to relocate all the Jews in Denmark. Since the Rosens were Jewish, Mr. and Mrs. Rosen were takin into hinding. Ellen went to live with the Johansens and pretended to be a part of the Johansen family. A few days later, Mrs. Johansen took her two daughters and Ellen to visit Uncle Henrik. The rest of the story is about the tremendous courage of Annemarie, Mrs. Johansen, Uncle Henrik, and Peter Neilsen and the trouble they endured to help their friends. I really enjoyed this book. It was very moving, suspenseful, and sad. Once I started reading it, I could not put it down. I highly recommend reading this book.
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lives in the Balance, December 11, 2002
By 
"mrsfaganselves" (huntington, ny United States) - See all my reviews
This book provides a wonderful opportunity for both kids and parents to read a good story together and study history from a children's perspective.
I always enjoyed reading historical novels, even as a kid, and my daughter, who isn't real crazy about reading, is beginning to change her mind because this story speaks to her. That it takes place in a country she never heard of before isn't relevant.
This is no fairy tale-it's the story of two Danish families, friends before the war, one Jewish and one Christian, who fight the effects of the German invasion of their country and the subsequent attempt to eliminate the Jewish population.
Through the pages of this book, we are given the story of the Rosens and the Johansens, who, on the eve of the Jewish New Year in 1943, wisely act to avert tragedy. The Rosens are blessed by the knowledge that the Nazis are beginning to move in and not paralyzed by fear into inaction. The Johansens are blessed by the knowledge that, as Danes, they could do nothing less but protect their friends and fellow Danes.
There are some scary moments, certainly, but not so frightening that children should avoid this book. Some books can be read without parents nearby; this one I recommend be read either by or with parents because some explanation of history is helpful.
One of the aspects of this book that I particularly liked was how it helps children to think and spot upcoming events.
At one point, for example, there's a reference to the Star of David necklace worn by one of the children. As the German soldiers barge into the Johansen home where the Jewish girl is hiding in plain sight, my daughter exclaimed that someone should hide the necklace before the soldiers find it. That's exactly what happens-the girls remove the necklace and the Germans are, temporarily, fooled into leaving them alone.
Luckily, the Johansens know that they've been granted a only a temporary reprieve, and so the rest of the story tells of Ellen Rosen's escape, along with most of the rest of Denmark's Jews, to Sweden and safety.
There are just enough ordinary details--the annoying younger sister, life in the shadow of a past tragedy--to leaven the story about the Nazis.
While the characters are fictional, the story, of course, is not, and so it is a great way for children to feel, rather than just hear, about the lives of people who fall victim to brutality and what individuals can do to combat evil.
I can't think of a better lesson for children to learn. Or grownups.
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118 of 143 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An undeniable classic, January 5, 2004
Though I was a child when this book was first published, somehow I managed to avoid reading any Lois Lowry until 2003 (much to the shock of my friends). It was worth the wait. This story departs from the usual World War Two fiction genre by placing the story in a unique setting with a different perspective. Everything occurs in Denmark, and we see the story unfold through the eyes of young Annemarie Johansen. Though she is not directly threatened by the actions of the Nazis that have invaded her peaceful country, her best friend Ellen Rosen is. Annemarie must use her head to save her friend from the concentration camps while endangering herself. I was impressed with the fact that the threat presented by the Germans in this book was made real without relying on gory details. In this way, Lowry has created a book about the Holocaust that is appropriate for juvenile readers. Be warned: There is no perfectly happy ending at the end of this story (the reader is not absolutely certain that the Rosenbergs have escaped and are coming back) but it should satisfy most children. Well worth a read.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is an important book for every child to read., November 24, 1999
By A Customer
I am studying to be an elementary teacher, and I read this book for a children's literature class. This book was very well written because it vividly shares the reality of life during the Holocaust while protecting young children from many of the details that might be too frightening for them. This book is unique because it gives a child's perspective of the Holocaust, detailing how living circumstances changed and how friends were taken away. I think that every child should read this book because children need to understand that the Holocaust was real and was not just some event in history. We should never forget the tragedy it was.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Number the Stars, February 17, 2000
By A Customer
Remarkable, intense and suspenseful are just three of millions of words that describe this book. The book has a groundbreaking plot and keeps you in suspense after every chapter. Read Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. This story depicts a struggle between a brave girl named, Annemarie, trying to help her best friend, a courageous girl, Ellen, a Jewish neighbor. This touching book takes place in the year 1943 when Annemarie and Ellen are fighting for freedom from the Nazi soldiers in Copenhagen, Denmark. When the soldiers invade Annemarie's house, Ellen was disguised as Lise,Annemarie's older sister. Will the soldiers find out who Ellen really is? Lois Lowry wrote very simply, but is very well organized. She keeps you in suspense after every chapter. Read this book and you will find yourself sitting at the edge of your seat. Will Annmarie help Ellen and her family escape the Nazi soldiers?
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28 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Every kid I know that has read this book loves it., November 29, 1998
By A Customer
This book is about a young girl named Annemarie, her family and their role in helping Jewish families escape the Germans during World War II. The Nazi soldiers invaded and took control of Denmark and its Danes. Ellen is Annemarie's best friend and is Jewish. Ellen and her family, the Rosens, must leave Denmark to go to Sweden where will be safe from the Nazi soldiers. There they will be safe because Sweden chose not to enter the war. Annemarie is sent on an important mission to deliver an important package to her Uncle Henrick. This package will determine if Ellen and her family will live to ever see their friends and homeland again. When the war finally ends after a devastating five years, Annemarie finds out about the real truth of her sister, Lise's death. Anna Marie is a bright, bold and brave girl. She is ten years old in the beginning of the book and twelve years at the end. She is a tall, thin and long legged girl with blond hair. Annemarie's best friend, Ellen, is a Jewish girl about her same age. Ellen is a very proper young lady. She is timid and quite fearful because of the Nazis and what she has heard they do to Jewish people. Ellen is also a short and stubby girl who wears her curly black hair in pigtails. Kirsti, who is Annemarie's young sister, is spoiled, self-centered, stubborn and very sociable. She is a typical seven year old! Annemarie's mom and Ellen's mom are great at worrying. Mr. Rosen, Ellen's dad, gets aggravated easily by the smallest things and is a teacher at the elementary school where the girls attend. Annemarie's dad is cautious and always acts so serious. Peter, Lise's fiance, is a brave and courageous man with red hair who works with the Resistance. My favorite part of Number the Stars is when Ellen pretends to be Annemarie's sister and the soldiers break into Annemarie's apartment. Annemarie tore the necklace, a "Star of David", from Ellen's neck so that the German soldiers wouldn't think that she is Jewish. I loved this book because it was always exciting and I never lost interest. Annemarie and her mom were incredibly brave. I could imagine how frightened Annemarie was when she had to carry the "special package" for her mother. She had to stay calm while German soldiers and their dogs questioned her on what she was doing and where she was going. She somehow knew that getting this "package" to her uncle would save many lives. I think that if I had to do what Annemarie did I would still be scared out of my wits. This book makes you appreciate your freedom even if you do have to clean up your room once in a while.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be required reading for all!, December 28, 2001
Lois Lowry is the well known author of childrens and young adult books which include titles such as The Giver and the Anastasia series. In the book, Number the Stars, winner of the prestigious Newberry Award, the author presents her readers with a thought provoking tale filled with memorable characters and plot which readers can think about long after they've closed the book.
This story begins in Amsterdam as the Nazis begin to occupy Holland. Life as it once was for this city will never be the same again especially for the two families portrayed here.
Ww first meet two young girls of separate families as they walk home from school. One girl is Christian, the other Jewish and they have always been the very best of friends. When they are questioned by two Nazi soldiers they are reluctant to tell their parents for fear they will worry. But also fearing what might happen to all of them, they eventually describe the incident to them. The parents, fully realizing that the situation is getting worse and worse for Jews and other minority groups, begin to make plans to insure the the safety of the Jewish family. Not only will these plans and decisions test their friendships but will alter the course of their lives.
Written primarily for children, this is a wonderful book which succeeds in presenting primarily school age children with some of thr ramifications of World War II and the plight of those persectuted by the Nazis. It also describes to readers at any age the role of courage and acts of extraordinary kindness during these dark days of the Nazi Occupation and World War II. By describing the plight of two families from Amsterdam, the reader is caught up in these tumultuous times and feels as though they are living next door to these people. While many books, both fiction and non-fiction have been written about this period in history and for all age groups, Lowry first presents the subject matter in a calm manner but one where emotions mount as one turns the pages. And certainly the book allows us a glimpse of how ordinary people risked their own lives to save others. As I closed the book I prayed for the safety of both families as if this was happening today. I do hope that they were reunited and finally the Jewish star could be returned to its rightful owner.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Lovingly Crafted Story, August 15, 2001
By 
"kaia_espina" (Quezon City, Philippines) - See all my reviews
This is a good historical book for children. The story is set in Occupied Denmark and told through the eyes of Annemarie Johansen, a 10-year-old girl who has to help save her Jewish friend Ellen. This novel humbly, simply and unsensationally honors the anonymous heroes and heroines of WWII.
However there are some elements and developments in the story that readers in Annemarie's age bracket may not understand. For example, at one point in the story, Annemarie discovers that sometimes it is okay to lie to your friends, in order to protect them. I'm sure that readers of this book will not grow up as quickly or as soon. In fact, readers and Annemarie may begin on the same level at the start of the novel, only to have Annemarie outpace them to maturity at the end.
There are also many beautiful but subtle nuances in the storytelling that may be confusing to young readers, such as Lois Lowry's many flashbacks and asides.
Moreover, readers who expect the kind of action and suspense found in "The Giver", another Newbery Award-winning book by Lowry, will be disappointed. They may find the plot boring and Annemarie passive. The reason for this is that Annemarie is not in the middle of the action, the way her friend Ellen is, but really on the sidelines. This is a story told by an introspective, sensitive observer. What it lacks in thrills and excitement it makes up for in depth. Children who have read "The Giver" and have felt what it is like to be the one who has to leave, can read "Number the Stars" and know what it is like to be the one left behind.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I'll give you it back someday!!!, March 4, 2005
A Kid's Review
Announcing best book for teens and adults. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry a famous author that has written 25 other books. Two of them are Gathering Blue and Dador. She has written all sorts of books but Number the Stars is historical fiction and it toke place in 1943 during the World War II. It was a pretty short read with only 137 pages. Number the Stars was published in 1989; vivid book has been around for a few years now.

This wonderful book Number the Stars was when Annemarie, Ellen Annemarie's best friend, and Kristi Annemarie's sister are running down the street and they run into two Nazi soldiers, then they start asking them all of these questions about the Jews and themselves. Then Annemarie's family has to hide Ellen because she is a Jew and if they find her then she will have to be taken away. After that then Annemarie's family has to go to Uncle Henrick's house. While they are there Annemarie goes on one of the biggest adventures of her life, she has to deliver a packet to Uncle Henrick. Will she make it in time before he leaves for Sweden with the Rosen's?

I loved the detail in the book. I could create a mind movie so well. In one part they described the Nazi soldiers. The two soldiers that were Annemarie's house were tall, looked angry, had deep voices, mysterious, and just plane old scary. I also liked the part when she meets the two dogs. The author said that they had drool coming down their faces and they also said that the two dogs could smell right through a fish and sniff out a human.

Another story element I enjoyed was when you just want to keep reading till the book is over. A part when, that happen in was when Annemarie, Ellen, and Kristi all were running and then the author was saying all this stuff that it could have been around that corner. It was two Nazi soldiers. And right before that they were having so much fun running down the street.

I thought this book was one of the most exciting. It made me want to keep reading and it kept my interest. I would give this book a 3˝ star out of a 4 stars. It will take you for a heck of a ride seeing how it was in 1943. You should really check it out soon.
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Number the Stars
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry (Paperback - May 2, 2011)
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