Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $3.17 (21%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 14 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Nutrient Timing: The Futu... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: PLEASE READ FULL DESCRIPTION -ACCEPTABLE- This is a WELL WORN COPY!!! Please understand that this book has been heavily read. The internal pages may contain writing/highlighting/underlining or any combination of these. We guarantee that all pages are intact and legible. We guarantee the binding to be intact.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Nutrient Timing: The Future of Sports Nutrition Paperback – February 20, 2004

110 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.78
$7.75 $2.09

Extreme Food: What to Eat When Your Life Depends on It by Bear Grylls
New from Bear Grylls, check out "Extreme Food"
Check out "Extreme Food", the newest release from popular author Bear Grylls. Learn more | See related books
$11.78 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 14 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Nutrient Timing: The Future of Sports Nutrition + Power Eating-4th Edition + Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body
Price for all three: $41.62

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Ivy, Ph.D., is a professor and head of the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at the University of Texas. He is a world-renowned expert on the role of nutrition in exercise performance. He has published over 150 research papers and review articles.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Health Pubns; 1 edition (February 20, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591201411
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591201410
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (110 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,795 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

78 of 80 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
If you're serious about gaining strength and lean muscle mass and improving your body composition, you should get this book. Written by two respected sports nutrition researchers, it presents a novel supplementation program for bodybuilders and strength athletes that is vastly different from what most gym rats are now doing yet is fully supported by the best and latest research.
The book's "bombshell" contention is that timed carbohydrate intake is more important than protein when it comes to building muscle. Nutrient Timing takes direct aim at what the authors call the "bulk nutrition" mentality: if protein is good, then more protein must be better. "Unfortunately," they say, "you can consume the protein of an entire cow, but if your muscles are not receptive at that particular time, the protein will be wasted." Ivy and Portman cite two conditions that make the muscles receptive to protein. The first is training. By disrupting muscle tissue, high-intensity lifting creates a short-term demand for protein in the muscles.
The second key is insulin. Studies show that insulin increases net protein balance in three ways: 1) it increases amino acid transport into the muscle, 2) it stimulates the enzymes that make protein from amino acids, and 3) it reduces the breakdown of protein. To get the full anabolic benefits of insulin requires that you maximize its release after your workouts. Protein is a weak stimulator of insulin. Carbohydrate is a much stronger stimulator of insulin. When carbohydrate and protein are taken together after a workout, insulin release is much greater than when protein is taken alone and it acts as a kind of fuel injector that drives protein synthesis.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
160 of 174 people found the following review helpful By Kate McMurry TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
The authors of this book are prestigious scientists who convincingly make their core point that it is crucial to carefully time the intake of particular types of sports drinks during and after exercise in order to build muscles. The book has a table of contents, extensive bibliography, index, and provides charts for determining one's daily calorie needs as well as sample meal plans for the recommended diet. After carefully studying the book, I wanted to instantly put the authors' ideas into action. Unfortunately, that was very hard to do because the book is not particularly user-friendly: (1) Because the book is aimed at weight lifters, one has to read the authors' other book, The Performance Zone, to find out that their sport-drink recommendations apply to all types of exercise. (2) The book is written like a college textbook rather than a how-to for the general public. (3) The authors don't provide either a list of sources for their sports drinks or do-it-yourself recipes. (4) The math is confusing in the important charts on pages 96-104. They give 3 examples, a 200-lb male who works out an unspecified amount of time once/day who needs 3800 calories/day; a 200-lb male who works out an unspecified amount twice/day who needs 4200 calories/day; a 130-lb-female who works out an unspecified amount once/day who needs 2340 calories/day. All 3 are instructed to drink the same amount of the 3 sports drinks, regardless of muscle mass or length of workout, and only the first male is instructed to take the muscle-growth drink before bed. I believe a 130-lb woman would, logically, require only about HALF of the drinks the 200-lb guys would need, and I can't figure out why everyone wouldn't need the bedtime protein drink.Read more ›
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is incredible. If you are well versed in recent sports nutrition research you are probably already familiar with a lot of what is presented here, however, this is definitely the best presentation of this information I have come across yet. The only other book I know of to discuss many of the topics presented here is "Optimal Muscle Performance and Recovery", by the late Edmund Burke, which was my favorite before "Nutrient Timing". As strength athletes, however, our specifics are usually relegated to a single chapter in a book focusing primarily on nutrition for endurance athletes. From there we are usually left to interpolate information not necessarily targeted to us. No more is this the case. We now have a book based entirely on recent research tailored specifically to our needs. This is a very quick and easy read and is the best presentation of nutrition for strength athletes I have yet to encounter. Keep in mind, it does assume a previous understanding of basic nutrition principles. Money spent on this book is money well spent... terrific.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Blejowski on February 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
You can spare yourself a long, dry slog through academic writing by just reading the first chapter or so in the free Kindle sample. All up, the take home message of this book is remarkably brief: Before, during AND after each workout, eat lots of protein, and an even greater amount of [preferably high G.I.] carbs. Consume them in liquid form. The rest of the day, eat healthy. Done.

The rest of the book is a somewhat agonising look at the academic studies and nuts and bolts stuff, and is just there to back up this core precept. It's good that they've done their research and that they're prepared to lay it all out for us. If that kind of stuff floats your boat, then you'll love the book. For everyone else, just follow the above guideline (you probably are already anyway) and leave the book to those with a deeper appreciation for the biochemistry side of things.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Nutrient Timing: The Future of Sports Nutrition
This item: Nutrient Timing: The Future of Sports Nutrition
Price: $11.78
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: protein powder manufacturers