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770 of 812 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's a tool like any other tool
This review was originally posted to <...> by Mike Avery

I've owned a Nutrimill, a Whispermill and now own a WonderMIll and a KitchenAid mill.

I started with the KitchenAid mill. I really like it for a number of reasons. I like that it extends the use of my KA, and that it was cheaper than the rest of the mills. Also, I like being able to produce...
Published on November 17, 2007 by noyb

versus
186 of 200 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Powerful but messy
Our experience with this mill generates this mixed review. Of high quality workmanship and very powerful and fast, this mill offers much to the "do-it-yourself" whole grain baker. However, it is a flour "puffer" and has driven us to mill only outdoors. My wife was reacting to the amount of fine flour dust it generated in the house. Secondly, since it is a flour...
Published on November 3, 2007 by Tim


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770 of 812 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's a tool like any other tool, November 17, 2007
This review was originally posted to <...> by Mike Avery

I've owned a Nutrimill, a Whispermill and now own a WonderMIll and a KitchenAid mill.

I started with the KitchenAid mill. I really like it for a number of reasons. I like that it extends the use of my KA, and that it was cheaper than the rest of the mills. Also, I like being able to produce cracked wheat and rye chops. In both cases, you want the grain lightly broken and still identifiable. In "The Bread Builders" the authors joke that when you make rye chops, you want three pieces out of the mill for each two that go in. Pretty much true. However, the down side is that it's difficult to produce finely milled flour. Like othes here, I use the two pass system.

Which is what led me to the WhisperMill. It ground grain very finely and had little in the way of adjustment. It went from very fine to very, very fine. No cracked wheat. No rye chops. And, it seemed that the flour quality wasn't as good for bread making purposes as I wanted. However, it was able to make flour in a single pass and could be used for extended periods of time.

That led me to buy a NutriMill because of its advertized and much ballyhooed wider range of settings, a larger hopper, and the claim that it was able to handle starts and stops with grain in the hopper, which the WhisperMill does not handle. Sadly, the wider range of settings is not terribly releavant. Instead of going from very fine to very, very fine it goes from fine to very, very fine. No cracked wheat, no rye chops, and still the breadmaking characteristics of the flour seemed lacking.

When I sold the bakery, I sold the NutriMill and sent the Whispermill off to be overhauled - employees had turned it off and on with grain in the hopper a few too many times. By this time, the Whispermill company had died and been resurected as Wondermill, so now my mill is the essentially identical wondermill. Same comments apply as to the WhisperMill.

The Whisper/Nutri.Wonder mills have larger hoppers than the KitchenAid and can be used pretty much continuously. In baking classes, I've seen a friend grind as much as 25 pounds without stopping, except to empty the output hopper. I think some people have modified their Wondermills to feed into a trash can sized hopper.

The common thread through the Whisper/Nutri/Wonder mill is that they are all micronizer mills. The grains are sent into spinning wheels that are turning at around 45,000 rpm and the grain explodes into powder.

This has implications. A number of implications. First, the output is homogenous. If you grind grain with a KitchenAid or similar maill you can sift out the bran and make whiter flour, Your flour will have flecks in it, which I find attractive. You cannot do that with micronizer producd flour, the particle size is far moreconsistent.

Next, the micronizers produce more damaged starch than steel or stone wheels. Heartland Mills says, "When wheat is milled into flour some of the starch granules in the endosperm are broken. This damaged starch absorbs much more water than the undamaged granules. If too little damaged starch is in the flour, it will be difficult to mix normal to high-hydration doughs. If there is too much, the flour will exhibit high absorption, but the loaf may flatten at the end of proofing as the excess water is released. In between these extremes, as damaged starch increases, absorption will go up, but at the expense of extensibility and overall dough strength."

Yin and yang. Black and white. Teeter and totter. Sweet and sour. Most things need a balance to work well. Most of the people I know who use mills to grind their own flour look more at nutrition than bread quality. They tend to serve bricks rather than well risen loaves. And the micronizers do support that pretty well. My observations of contemporary America is that few of us seem to be malnourished.

However, I know that some people are concerned about trace mineral deficiencies. Minerals are not depleted in the whole grain flours sold on the shelves. Some people are concerned that whole wheat flour goes rancid quickly after milling. To some extent that is true, but I am not convinced that is significant if you buy flour from a merchant with quick turnover of their stocks.

Other people feel freshly ground tastes better. I won't argue that point, as there is no disputing taste.

The bread making characteristics of the stone or steel wheel mills seems to be higher than from the micronizer mills. However, the steel and stone mills have issues too. The KitchenAid is limited as to how much it can make in a single run. The KA's motor will get hot. Like other posters, I make flour in two passes. I will grind as much as 5 pounds, let the mixer rest, and then make another pass. This is OK for home use... mostly. Steel and stone mills such as the Retsel and Sampo are considerably more expensive, but are said to produce much better flour, and can make coarsely ground grain as well.

You can find Retsel and Sampo dealers on line, check Google or bizrate.

If you have a micronizer mill, you can work with your recipes to get the best results you can. First, be patient. Let the flour absorb the water. My 5 minute knead, 5 minute rest and 5 minute knead regimen works very well here. These breads really benefit from the use of vital wheat gluten. I use about 5 or 6% as a baker's percentage. If you go much higher, the bread can acquire a gummy texture that most people find objectionable. I suggest using an American organic vital wheat gluten, such as Bob's Red Mill as the Chinese gluten has been contaminated in the recent past.

Hope that helps,

Mike
=== UPDATE OCT 2011 by NOYB ===
I am the person who REposted Mike Avery's review of the Nutrimill (Mike's review was orignally posted on the forum thefreshloaf.com on Nov 2007). I found Mike's review immensely helpful and am glad that so many others have also.

I am a long time member of the baking forum thefreshloaf.com where I post under the name "subfuscpersona".

Mike Avery's review of the Nutrimill was part of a more extensive discussion of grain mills for the home miller. The link for this discussion is <...>

As "subfuscpersona" I posted my *personal* review of the Nutrimill on this discussion. Amazon does *not* allow me to review a product more than once, but I thought that future buyers might be interested in my experience with the Nutrimill as a supplement to that of Mike Avery. Interested readers should copy and paste the link I gave in the above paragraph to get a more complete picture from the original discussion on thefreshloaf.com.
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168 of 175 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great customer service. NOW I love my Nutrimill!, January 13, 2009
By 
I have owned this mill for almost a year. Based on all the reviews I was expecting to love it. However, I was very disappointed in its performance in several areas:

1) as other reviewers have mentioned, it was extremely loud, much louder than the loudest vacuum cleaner, with a very high ear-piercing pitch. It was so loud that I installed an outlet in a cabinet, so it would be slightly quieter when I used the mill. Even then, I had to be in a different part of the house to endure the noise.

2) it was extremely messy. The mill produced a lot of flour "dust" around it. I measured about 3/4 cup of "wasted flour" when milling only 3 cups of grain!

3) the mill took an extremely looooong time to mill: about 45 minutes to grind 3 cups of flour!

HOWEVER, I LOVED the flour that the Nutrimill produced! So, I put up with its downfalls to get that wonderfully fine, fresh flour. But, occasionally I would come across other reviews praising the mill so much that I wondered if something was wrong with mine.

I called Kitchen Resources and told them the problems I've outlined here and they promptly sent a replacement bowl and lid, thinking that the problem might have been a faulty seal on the lid. I very excitedly tried out my new bowl, but to the same effect as before, just as much mess, noise, and grinding time.

I got to where I did not even use the Nutrimill very often, I was so sick of its problems. Finally, I called Kitchen Resources again and was told to send them the whole machine for service. I repackaged it in the original packaging and sent it by UPS for about $20.

About 2 weeks later, my Nutrimill was returned with a service note that they had verified that it was not working properly and they had changed several parts including the entire motor!

I immediately tried grinding some soft wheat berries and it was like it was a TOTALLY DIFFERENT MACHINE!

1) the noise level now WAS like a loud vacuum cleaner; the high ear-piercing pitch was gone. I've realized now that that is what it sounds like when the hopper is empty, but the mill is still trying to grind. Now I could easily handle being right next to it when grinding. It is loud, but not unbearable.

2) it is still a little messy. Some flour blows out, but NOTHING like before. Now all I have to do is wipe a little flour off the counter when I'm done, instead of cleaning the whole kitchen or inside of the cabinet where I was grinding.

3) the most amazing difference was in the grinding time! I was overjoyed to actually be able to see the grain going down in the hopper and to grind the amount I needed for breakfast in only a minute! I was so excited that I promptly ground about 10 more cups of flour, something I had never done at one time before because it would have taken more than 2 hours! Now it only took about 5 minutes!

Finally I can say that I really do LOVE my Nutrimill!

And I am extremely pleased with Kitchen Resource's wonderful customer service. They are more than willing to deal with any problem you are having. If you are considering buying a Nutrimill, I would not hesitate. It is a great machine, produces wonderful flour, and has a great company standing behind it with a lifetime warranty. And if you are having any problem with it, or do not love it like other reviewers do, there is a reason. Please get it checked out so that you can love your Nutrimill too!
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186 of 200 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Powerful but messy, November 3, 2007
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Our experience with this mill generates this mixed review. Of high quality workmanship and very powerful and fast, this mill offers much to the "do-it-yourself" whole grain baker. However, it is a flour "puffer" and has driven us to mill only outdoors. My wife was reacting to the amount of fine flour dust it generated in the house. Secondly, since it is a flour puffer, fine flour covers the entire mill - every surface, nook, and cranny. Additionally, the motor air cooling passages get a fine coating of flour. Some of these surfaces are impossible to clean. Since we live in Florida were our home's internal humidity is always in the 55 to 60% range, we find mold growing on the surfaces we either fail to clean or cannot clean. We are now in the market for a manual mill that can be completely disassembled and cleaned easily.
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95 of 105 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I LOVE this mill!, July 13, 2005
By 
I've had this mill for a few months and it's wonderful. Not a speck of flour on my counter afterward. It's fast and quieter than my vacuum cleaner. It really does do SUPER fine flour all the way to cereal grain. Easy cleanup, easy to store, great capacity. I debated between the Nutrimill & Whisper Mill, but I'm glad I went with this one!
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45 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars if it seems slow or messy, try this . . ., December 15, 2008
The other reviews just about cover it. A couple of technical items:
The flour produced on a "coarser" setting is really nearly as fine as on the "fine" setting, and makes a lighter, tastier bread product. Set on say, the "a" in "coarser" you can grind several cups in less than five minutes. If you need a fine flour for a pastry or whatnot, just sift it. You'll lose some of the husk part of whole-grain-ness, but most of the benefit and all the good taste will still be left! (More "healthy" cookies, anyone?)

If you find that your mill is blowing out flour, check the gaskets between the mill and the base. The black gasket in mine was put in upside-down, which I was able correct myself. If you're hesitant to do that, a vaccum repairman could probably do it for you in about 30 seconds.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very satisfied, January 8, 2011
By 
padlnjones (greenville, SC United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: NutriMill Classic Grain Mill (Kitchen)
I had a Retsel stone mill that died. Instead of replacing it, I got the Nutrimill. I can't say whether or not the micronized flour retains the nutrients as good as the stone mill (I suspect there isn't much difference), but the performance of the machine, and the performance of the flour is clearly better.

As for the machine: it is much faster (although that is not the most relevant criteria), and is not as messy as the Retsel in dusting the counters, etc., it is noisy, but not a deal breaker (and because it's fast it's not on for very long) I had considered that I would grind on the porch if it was too noisy, but it's not that big a problem...It's much easier to clean than the Retsel, which involved removing the stone burrs and scraping the stones.

As to the results: I like to make cornbread with fresh ground corn; there is really no comparison with store bought cornmeal. Nutrimill recommends popcorn, and it has made some delicious corn bread. With the retsel it was always a problem grinding corn as the stones would gum up very easily and sometimes have to be cleaned in the middle of a batch. Or, I would have to stand there and force the corn into the grinder. Also, I would have to sift the grits out to use the flour. With the Nutrimill, it is fast, and the flour is fine and doesnt need sifting (no waste). FAR superior in grinding corn.

With wheat, the retsel did a good job, but the bran was larger compared to the micronized flour from the Nutrimill. I had read that these longer strands of bran with their sharp edges would cut the gluten, and result in heavier whole wheat bread. This has been my experience since getting the new mill. My bread with fresh ground flour rises and performs more like store bought unbleached bread flour, resulting in a much lighter loaf than the retsel's flour gave me.

So, I am very satisfied with this machine. As I said, there may be nutritional differences as compared with stone ground, or maybe not. But if the proof of the baking is in the eating, this is a winner.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Machine!, December 29, 2011
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This review is from: NutriMill Classic Grain Mill (Kitchen)
After many years of ArmStrong (hand-crank) flour making, the NutriMill turns that job into a pleasure.

I read reviews galore, and to tell you the truth, many of them are scary. Some say it is almost like having a 747 engine running in the kitchen, others insinuate that it blows flour everywhere - like a hurricane dust storm combination... What in the world are these people doing?

1. How loud is it? Only about 2/3 as loud as my blender... You can carry on a normal conversation around it while it is running. You only run it a few minutes - noise is NOT a problem!

2. How messy is it? If you put the canister all the way in, there is way less mess than crank mill. Yes, if you do not seat the canister all the way in, it will blow flour out - not hard to do, just remember to give it a reassuring push before turning it on. I was pleasantly surprised how cleanly it works. A couple of taps on the canister top and filter greatly reduces spillage from removing cover.

3. How fast is it? Very fast! No, not instantaneous - you are milling good quality flour, not firing a cannon... Is it really important to find a mill that may take 7 sec. less, or is quality the goal? If you have ever milled flour, I think you will be quite pleasantly surprised how quickly it works.

4. How hot is the flour? Nutrient preservation depends on not overheating the flour - this mill produces flour less than 120 degrees F. If you want it cooler, put the grain in the freezer before grinding. It won't get over room temperature that way.

5. What to grind? So far, I have done Red, White & Gold wheat (both hard and soft), Millet, Pop Corn, Rye, Barley, Lentils, Peas, Black beans, soybeans, Garbanzo, Pinto beans, Navy beans. All of them produced a very fine flour! Have made some very interesting breads, pizzas, biscuits, pastries, pancakes and crackers with them! (Just don't do oily grains - NO peanuts, flax, etc.)

What would I change? Well, not much! It would be nice to be able to get extra canister bases and to have tops for them. That way you could do different flours and have storage for them. (I make more mess transferring flour into other containers than in the grinding) Aside from that, I am one VERY HAPPY grinder/baker/eater! (Now gotta keep up with family special requests - today it is pita pockets, baguettes and several different crackers for new years)

Note: I was a bit concerned about power outages - what to do? Well, have tried it on my power inverter - works great. Of course, my generator will run it too. Five minutes every couple of days is definitely doable...

There WILL be bread!
*** 18 Month update***
After months of use and several 50 pound bags of grain ground, there is not a single thing I would change in above review! Grinds just as well as it did first day! Couldn't be happier! (Two daughters now call in their special flour requests..... Dad's Nutrimill fills the bill for them too...)
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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite mill, December 4, 2007
This is the mill that Me and My House uses daily and recommends. I've had and used flour mills daily for about 15 years. I've had this one a somewhere between one and two years. It is my favorite. Quieter than the others, cleaner than the others (keeping the filter cleaned and in place keeps the flour where it's suppose to be and not all over the counter), nice big hopper and flour bowl (I love that the hopper holds as much as the flour bowl - fill it once and it fills the bowl - with enough flour to do a large batch of bread!) and it does a GREAT job of making GREAT flour to whatever degree of coarseness or fineness I want out of all the beans and grains I want. But most of all I love the convenience of the flour bowl that just slides in and out under the mill heads. This is the most convenient mill!
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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love this mill, December 15, 2007
I use this mill daily and love it!. I have a group of friends who all mill their own flour. After checking out their mills, I decided on this one. I don't have the problem of it being messy. Sure there is a little flour on the counter when I bake, but that would be the case too if I opened a bag of store-bought flour. I have my mill in a kitchen cabinet (lower-shelved one), together with my grain. When I mill, I close the cabinet door, so noise is reduced. I have not noticed the inside of the cabinet getting excessively dusty. After each milling, I use a pastry brush to clean all the parts that need dusting. Now, this part of clean-up can get pretty dusty, so I do this outdoors,and it only takes a minute to do. I heard that some people use a small handvac for clean-up.
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44 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great product, October 18, 2007
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I have owned my Nutrimill for 3 months and I use it daily to make flour for bread. It is great. I can make flour very fine for pastry or less fine for bread, cereal or tabouli. I can add grain while the machine runs. I was using the Vitamix until I burned out the motor. The problem I had with Vitamix was that the flour got so hot while grinding I had to refrigerate the grain before using it. The Vitamix cannot do more than about 2 cups at a time and that was a real pain. With the Nutrimill I do all I need in one load and the flour comes out warm and smelling great.
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NutriMill Classic Grain Mill
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