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Nutrition Almanac (4th ed) Paperback – June 18, 1996


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Product Details

  • Series: 4th ed
  • Paperback: 494 pages
  • Publisher: Mcgraw-Hill; 4th edition (June 18, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0070349223
  • ISBN-13: 978-0070349223
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 8 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,166,981 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

The first three editions of Nutrition Almanac sold more than 2.5 million copies. The 494-page fourth edition is expanded and updated, with new information to answer your questions and help you plan your personal nutritional program. "Nutrition is the relationship of foods to the health of the human body," explain the Kirschmanns (daughter and father), and they cover every aspect of how food relates to health. A detailed section on nutrients, for example, describes each vitamin and mineral, how it is absorbed and stored, dosage and toxicity, deficiency effects and symptoms, beneficial effect on ailments, and research findings. Another section offers 175 pages of common ailments and stressful conditions that may be related to nutrition, and which nutrients, exercise, herbs, and homeopathic remedies may be beneficial for each. A shorter chapter on herbs summarizes the medicinal uses of 70 herbs. The book also includes 73 pages of extensive nutritional information about common foods, showing how they help meet the RDA for each nutrient for both babies and adults. It is surprising in a book as up-to-date as this one that the authors choose to include height/desirable-weight charts, which are thought by experts to be outdated and irrelevant to health. Otherwise, this is a reference book you'll use often if you care about tracking and improving your nutrition. --Joan Price

From the Back Cover

The Nutrition Almanac is a favorite reference in more than 2.5 million American homes for good reason. It is a complete nutritional guide that empowers you to take charge of your own health. It offfers quick answers to questions about nutrients plus gives you everything you need to plan a total nutritional program, all in a friendly, down-to-earth style. This edition is painstakingly expanded and updated to put thousands more of the latest scientific findings about nutrition and health at your fingertips. The Nutrition Almanac: offers simple, sensible, accurate, and complete nutritional information; provides a full nutritional analysis of more than 1,600 foods; explains the scientific basis for preventing, and sometimes curing, illnesses through proper nutrition; tells how to use vitamin and mineral supplements for better health; provides source and dose information on vitamins and minerals; covers the role of antioxidants, phytochemicals, polyphenols, and phytoestogrens in optimum health; offers helpful information on healthful cooking; explores alternative treatments such as homeopathy and aromatherapy; explains the relationships among exercise, diet, and health; charts important information for easy reading.

Customer Reviews

Other than this, it's a great book - mine is falling apart from use.
Pat S.
It goes into detail about vitamins, minerals, herbs, illnesses, etc... I use it for everything from weightloss and heart disease to my husbands sunburn.
Rhonda Florian
They do not, with fiber contributing none and other carbs various amounts up to 4 kcal/g (Livesey 2001).
Joel M. Kauffman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Joel M. Kauffman on February 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
Seemingly authoritative, this 4th ed. is to be read at your own risk.
The benefits of aerobic exercise are confused with those from anerobic exercise (p9). Anerobic exercise utilizes 14 times as much glucose as aerobic does (Bernstein 1997, pp179-190). Heart disease patients are very little aided by hard exercise (Dorn 1999).
All carbohydrates are said to contain similar amounts of energy (p19). They do not, with fiber contributing none and other carbs various amounts up to 4 kcal/g (Livesey 2001). Complex carbohydrates are said to break down more slowly than simple sugars (p20). This does not explain why many complex carbs have a more serious effect on blood glucose levels than some simple sugars. The important notion of glycemic index (GI) is missing, even when recommending for Type 2 diabetics, thus the recommendation for 50-60% of their diet to be complex carbs (p207) has no basis in reality, and is quite destructive (Bernstein pp33-48, 121-140). Everyone is said to require a minimum of 100 g/day, and that 300 g/day is ideal for most people (p20). Actually there is NO carbohydrate requirement for humans. Glucose is made from amino acids when needed (Ottoboni pp25,85). Ask any Eskimo! (McGee 2001 pp82-86,109).
The GI is measured in humans by checking blood glucose levels after eating. The GI of a food shows the % glucose levels rise compared with the same weight of glucose (GI = 100). One of the things that creates high (bad) insulin levels is high blood glucose levels.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Pat S. on September 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
I own the 1979 version of Nutrition Almanac. It has been very helpful to me in information, and in tracking my nutrition intake. However, I recently started counting grams of fiber, and started questioning when I couldn't get anywhere near the RDA of 25 grams. Then I remembered that years ago, insoluable fiber was not included in nutrition information, as it's benefit was not yet known. So I decided to purchase the latest version, and to my surprise, it has the same low fiber numbers as my 1979 version. I looked up 3 different fruits in this book and another, and there was a huge difference in grams of fiber listed. Other than this, it's a great book - mine is falling apart from use. If you want to increase your natural sources of vitamins and minerals, this book will show you which foods they are in.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Student of Heart Disease on May 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
I bought this book at the local bookstore after looking at other books in the same area. I have only read a few articles - however, I USE THE FOOD COMPOSITION TABLES CONSTANTLY! This is Section IX - Table of Food Composition, starting on page 389. The authors give 35 elements in each food (after measure and weight) - starting with calories, protein, numerous vitamins and minerals, and the 8 essential amino acids. If you're trying to understand which foods contain the most of a certain element, this is great! This (or something like it) is a must-have for dealing with various diets! I use this all the time to look up vegetables, fruits, beans, meats, etc.
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21 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Barbara Owen on March 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
I was so disappointed with the contents of the food composition section of this book that I sent it back for a refund. If you want to know true food values this is not for you. If, however you eat food from Arby's, MacDonald's,Kentucky Fried Chicken, etc., they are listed here in alphabetical order by corporation name. You can also find products from Campbell's, Swanson, etc. also listed alphabetically by corporation. There was one page devoted to vegetables. Not for those looking for basic nutrition information.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent resource on nutrition. I used it to develop a list of nutrients regularly depleted in the medical history of an Alzheimer's victim. It was the only source I found that summarized that information for a number of diseases. It's breakdown of the nutritional components of foods is also excellent.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
Arranged in such a way that it is easy to find specific topics. Information on each nutrient is concise and well presented. A good addition to any library, especially if you are interested in a healthier, more balanced approach to nutrition.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
Nutrional Almanac is a must-have reference work for anyone who is seriously interested in promoting health through proper nutrition. The no-nonsense approach is based on sound scientific research - there's no "quackery" here.
As a Distributor of high-quality GNLD nutritional supplements this book is absolutely indispensable. The Ailments Guide is invaluable for both health care professionals and laymen alike.
I can highly recommend this book - it's true value for money.
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Rhonda Florian on May 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
I have totally enjoyed this book. It has a lot of valuable information. It goes into detail about vitamins, minerals, herbs, illnesses, etc... I use it for everything from weightloss and heart disease to my husbands sunburn. It's excellent!
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