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Nux Vomica Enhanced


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Audio CD, Enhanced, April 24, 2007
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 24, 2007)
  • Original Release Date: 2007
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Enhanced
  • Label: Rough Trade
  • ASIN: B000O5B4S8
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #246,285 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Not Yet
2. Calliope!
3. Advice For Young Mothers To Be
4. Jesus For The Jugular
5. Pan
6. A Birthday Present
7. Under The Folding Branches
8. Nux Vomica
9. One Night On Earth
10. House Where We All Live

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

US version includes one bonus track, 'Night Thoughts of a Tired Surgeon' along with an enhanced video to 'Advice for Mothers to be'. Highly anticipated sophomore release by this New Zealand Alterna-Pop band led by Finn Andrew . Features ten new tracks which vary in style and structure yet remain atmospherically connected. Rough Trade.

Amazon.com

"It looks an ugly world out there" moans Veils leader Finn Andrews as the New Zealand quintet opens their sophomore album Nux Vomica, and the outlook doesn't get much sunnier as the veil is lifted to reveal eleven theatrical and contradictory tracks. Nux Vomica is the Latin name for a poison tree of South East Asia, source of deadly strychnine, and the Veils seem to have ingested just enough to hurt--behind the alluring melody and lush instrumentation of each song here, there's an unmistakable menace seeping through. The shadow of Echo and the Bunnymen looms large (the title track could have been a "Killing Moon" b-side), and more than a trace of the punctuated rhythms of past New Zealand indie notables the Verlaines in the somber and swaggering "Jesus for the Jugular." The enhanced disc also contains a video for "Advice for Young Mothers to Be", which might cause concern at Child Protective Services if it weren't so amusing. --Ben Heege

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
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See all 12 customer reviews
This album really is amazing, and never leaves my Ipod.
Melia Peterson
This New Zealand band has a new lineup and a new sound, not to mention the kind of renewed energy that bands rarely have on their sophomore album.
E. A Solinas
They have a depth to them that seems rare in modern music.
A. Shaw

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 29, 2007
Format: Audio CD
The Veils are doing a pretty good job of obscuring the lines between genres -- is their second album: A. classic metal, B. Britpop, or C. wild weird indiepop?

Answer: D, all of the above. This New Zealand band has a new lineup and a new sound, not to mention the kind of renewed energy that bands rarely have on their sophomore album. And in "Nux Vomica" they tear through different musical genres, with brilliantly raw results.

"It looks an ugly world out there/Of girl-guides and disease and war/I love my little velvet bed/I never want to leave it anymore," howls Finn Andrews in the opening song. "All my fears will come to me in dreams/Maybe the end ain't as far as it seems/Not yet revived but not yet mourned/Not quite denied just not yet born..."

The song he's singing changes several times as it plays -- it starts off as a some of folksy ballad, but them blooms out into an eerie synthy hard-rocker, and then into as sort of piano-edged metal. And over it all, he's wailing, "I TRIIIIIIIIIIED.... I TRIIIIIIED..." By the end of it, I was dizzy.

Things don't get any less colourful with the songs that follow. Each one seems to give a new spin on indie-rock -- flavoured with calliope, soulfully edged with soaring voices, ominous and distorted, smashing alt-rock, twinkly hard-rockers. They even work in a ballad, "Under The Folding branches," which is an exquisite little shimmer of strings and piano.

The Veiils are apparently trying to wring every last drop of inspiration from their music -- they smush classic indie-rock, moments of hard-rock and metal, with driving Britpop edges. And it all serves as the frame for Andrews' songs of uncertainty and sorrow.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sean H. Campbell on January 22, 2007
Format: Audio CD
A few thoughts about this great little album I've seen no media reaction to, sadly:

Having luckily found out about The Veils years ago thanks to the ever-helpful Thomas Bartlett (formerly found for the past three years at [...] Wednesday Morning Download/Audiofile section) recommending their neverendingly gorgeous song "Lavinia," I've been a pretty avid and constant follower of their music ever since. It's tough to divine information from the usually-reliable internet about The Veils at times, but well over a year ago, the band broke up after their basically brilliant and fully-formed debut, The Runaway Found. Finn Andrews, son of an XTC founder and the mastermind behind all the music, most likely, soon recreated the band with some old mates, pairing down the sound to something raw and more immediate and piano-driven, as opposed to the full-band, guitar-attack, drum-intensive sound from the debut. Happily, the gamble paid off, at least creatively (when the heck is this album going to see a US release?).

Andrews has a voice that SOME people say is an acquired taste, but I find it endlessly fascinating. Hopefully, you'll give it a real chance because it's a rich, emotive, and flexible instrument, though it might require some patience if you're used to, you know, some other sort of music that doesn't require anything. Thematically, there's a lot of theological rage found in the lyrics, and this is echoed by the, at times, angry and frantic vocal work (see "Jesus For the Jugular"). As I said, the piano is nearly omnipresent, and it is put to good use throughout. This doesn't stop the electric and acoustic guitars from taking the stage either, mind you. Nor has Andrews' sparkling sense of melody waned in the least.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Barger on April 24, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Is this a Brit pop band? A New Zealand heavy metal stomp outfit? The latest chamber rock wunderkind in the mold of the Arcade Fire and Okkervil River? The Veils are all these things, and a bit more. The Kiwi lead singer, who sounds like a mix of Robert Plant and the dude who fronts the Violent Femmes (really, stay with me here), growls and emotes over piano, high-hat heavy drums and aggressive guitar. But how did these guys get so adept at pop, anthems, what sounds like American southern rock boogies and heart-wrenching love ballads? America hasn't heard of these guys, but when this CD comes out in April, I trust they will...the Veils are, to quote Hank Williams, Sr., "wild and blue."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rudolph Klapper on December 24, 2009
Format: Audio CD
New Zealand collective the Veils have always been a front, a smokescreen for the roiling mess of emotions that make up singer/lyricist Finn Andrews and his nakedly emotional, often abrasive tales. He's the kind of obsessive frontman who writes all the songs, directs everyone how to play, and truly becomes the soul of the band; it should come as no surprise, then, that Nux Vomica, the Veils' sophomore effort, features an entirely new cast of backing musicians than their debut did. Perhaps even more importantly, it features Andrews (son of Barry Andrews of `80s power-popsters XTC) doing what he does best: emoting exactly what he feels, as dramatically and as powerfully as possible. One would think all this single-minded input would lead the Veils' to become a bit stale. On the contrary, however, Nux Vomica is Andrews' shining achievement, a tightly focused, poetic work that establishes Andrews' as a gifted songwriter in his own right and perhaps one of the most impassioned performers in rock today.

With The Runaway Found, the Veils seemed too attuned to major label interests, writing songs that yearned for radio airplay but in the process tended to suffocate Andrews' outsized ego and combustible personality. It's immediate right from the opening howl of "Not Yet," however, that Andrews isn't going to restrain himself this go around. A Western-tinged rollercoaster of sliding guitars and rollicking drums led on by Andrews' fiery vocals, it's an appropriate opening thesis for Nux Vomica, telling the kind of literate story and twisted metaphors that Andrews long ago mastered with wild instrumental fervor.
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