O Tempo e o Vento

September 27, 2013 | Format: MP3

$8.99
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2:09
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1:29
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2:27
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 27, 2013
  • Label: Som Livre
  • Copyright: (c) 2013 Som Livre
  • Total Length: 57:03
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00FEYWAO6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #294,975 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By Jon Broxton on March 21, 2014
Format: MP3 Music
O Tempo e o Vento (“Time and the Wind”) is an epic, sprawling Brazilian film based on the series of novels by Portuguese-language author Erico Verissimo. Directed by Jayme Monjardim and starring Thiago Lacerda, Marjorie Estiano, Oscar nominee Fernanda Montenegro, Cléo Pires and Mayana Moura, the film chronicles 150 years of two rival families – the Cambarás and the Amarals – as they battle for supremacy, while the formation of the modern state of Brazil and various wars, revolutions, political crises and events happen around them.

O Tempo e o Vento’s score is by Brazilian composer Alexandre Guerra, a graduate of the Berklee College of Music, who has been writing music for South American productions from his home in São Paulo for the last decade or so, but who has had little recognition outside his native country. O Tempo e o Vento could change all that. The score is simply superb; lush, sweeping, thematically strong, and with a powerful orchestral style that speaks of wide open spaces, rich landscape vistas, and strong familial ties. It’s probably best described as a Brazilian Legends of the Fall, with all the positive connotations that comparison implies.

The strong main theme first appears in the opening “Liberdade a Vento”, a solemnly beautiful piece for strings that goes through numerous crescendos and instrumental variations as it develops, but this is far from a monothematic work. Throughout the score Guerra adds in different textures and tempos, thankfully keeping the music interesting. “História de Pedro Índio” features a children’s choir and a much more downbeat aspect. “Ataque à Missão” is a rich, powerful orchestra-and-chorus action piece with a wonderful, florid string ostinato underpinning the cue.
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