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65 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Superb primary or secondary storage
I purchased the Vertex 3 specifically for gaming so this will the focus of my review. I've owned all three generations of Vertex drives and I'm most pleased with this drive. That pleasure comes from the capacity and speed of the Vertex 3.

The Vertex 3 drive itself is a 2.5" form factor and comes with a 3.5" adapter this time around. Great for those desktop...
Published on April 21, 2011 by Chris Angelo

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161 of 193 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This drive model has a hardware defect
This drive is built with a SandForce 2281 chip which has a hardware bug. For many users, myself included, this will randomly cause your computer to crash with the blue screen of death. For me, it used to happen every few weeks now it happens every few days. When this problem happens the hard drive will seem to disappear from your computer until you power it off and on...
Published on August 23, 2011 by Ian Montgomerie


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65 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Superb primary or secondary storage, April 21, 2011
By 
Chris Angelo (South San Francisco, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: OCZ Technology 240 GB Vertex 3 SATA III 6.0 Gb/s 2.5-Inch Solid State Drive VTX3-25SAT3-240G (Personal Computers)
I purchased the Vertex 3 specifically for gaming so this will the focus of my review. I've owned all three generations of Vertex drives and I'm most pleased with this drive. That pleasure comes from the capacity and speed of the Vertex 3.

The Vertex 3 drive itself is a 2.5" form factor and comes with a 3.5" adapter this time around. Great for those desktop installs, however you will still need to purchase a SATA cable to connect it. To get the most out of this drive, you'll need a SATA III (6GB) port since the blazzing speed of this drive will max out a SATA II connection.

The drive currently resides in my sandy bridge desktop system as a secondary storage location for all my steam games and Starcraft 2. Along side a Vertex 2 60 gig that is the primary OS disk, the formated capacity of 223GB provides plenty of space for most of the titles that I actively play. It was a bit of a struggle to fit my steam folder on the Vertex 3 as it is quite easy to accumulate numerous titles via steam. With a much higher capacity traditional hard disk, you can keep most all of your titles available locally, but sadly this isn't the case with a drive of this capacity. It's the price you pay for having such blistering fast speed.

You can read a number of reviews stating the theoretical and real world tests illustrating the Vertex 3's speed, but I was mainly concerned with the user experience improvement gained from having one in my system. Copying my 160 gig steam folder was quite fast, maxing out the read transfer rate of my magnetic hard disk at about 75-80 MB per second. After the copy, I proceeded to launch Portal 2 which I had been playing the night before. If you haven't played the game, there are many level transitions that happen between chambers (or in my case deaths). The load times on my traditional magnetic hard drive were around 15-20 seconds. On the Vertex 3, the loads were shortened by 10 to 15 seconds. It was quite a difference that definitely improved my user experience as I was spending more time playing instead of staring at a progress bar.

Playing starcraft 2, I found the improvement to be much more subtle as the game files were previously on my Vertex 1. The menus seemed a bit more responsive, but it wasn't as stark a contrast moving from the magnetic drive. World of Warcraft ran slightly faster as well, shaving a couple of seconds loading into major cities or instances. Heroes of Newerth didn't seem to be affected that much, but then again the install for the game is only ~500MB.

I plan on installing this drive in my new gaming desktop replacement notebook later on in the year as a primary OS/Program drive. I'm sure I will appreciate the larger capacity when trying to jam the OS, productivity apps, and games all on a single drive.

My only current gripe with the Vertex 3 is the high cost. While I would love to have a second one to replace my Vertex 1 and 2, the $500+ price tag doesn't justify the speed increase I would gain over the older drives. At nearly $2 per GB, it is quite the barrier to owning multiple Vertex 3 drives at this capacity.

I would like to note that this is an enthusiast item since the manufacturer (OCZ) is consistently improving the firmware for their products. From past experience with the Vertex 1 and 2, most of the updates are minor bug fixes, but there are some revisions that add performance gains as well. Updating the firmware has come a long way as a short time. Previously, it wasn't easy to flash a drive that had an OS on it while running the OS. Boot disks were needed and constantly needed to be rebuilt as new firmware came out. OCZ's new toolbox is much better now, but updating firmware still isn't for the novice user or someone that expects to plug the drive in and never worry about it again.

Overall, I love my new SSD. It allows me to accomplish most tasks on my system with less frustration induced by wait times and unresponsiveness. Just be sure to plan your program installations accordingly and have the appropriate hardware to get the most out of your purchase.

Update: April 2012
As of July 2011, OCZ has updated the firmware to 2.15 to correct the stability issues plaguing the Sandforce 2281 controller. I have been running the firmware since then both on a Agility 3 as my primary OS drive and on the vertex 3 containing the majority of my games. I have yet to encounter stuttering or stability problem that I experienced on the previous revisions for the 6+ months I've been running it. Subjectively, the speed is the same as when I secured erased both drives to reinstall Windows 7.

OCZ has since released the Vertex 4 drives based on the Everest 2 controller. If you write a lot of incompressable data to your SSD (such as videos), the Vertex 4 is a better choice. If price and a more aggressive garbage collection (for non TRIM OSes such as OSX) are more important, the Vertex 3 is still a great buy.
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161 of 193 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This drive model has a hardware defect, August 23, 2011
This review is from: OCZ Technology 240 GB Vertex 3 SATA III 6.0 Gb/s 2.5-Inch Solid State Drive VTX3-25SAT3-240G (Personal Computers)
This drive is built with a SandForce 2281 chip which has a hardware bug. For many users, myself included, this will randomly cause your computer to crash with the blue screen of death. For me, it used to happen every few weeks now it happens every few days. When this problem happens the hard drive will seem to disappear from your computer until you power it off and on again (reset does nothing, because you have to actually cut power to the SandForce 2281 in the drive).

Not everyone sees the bug - it looks like the exact configuration of some computers triggers it much more easily. For the technically minded, each system generates different access patterns to the hard drive and only some patterns will trigger the bug.

Corsair also used this chip in their products and encountered the exact same problem. They issued a recall back in June. The popular AnandTech hardware review site has reproduced this problem and a description of it appears on the first page of their latest review of drives using the SandForce 2281 chip. SandForce has offered to fly in engineers if AnandTech can figure out how to reproduce it more quickly.

Unlike Corsair, OCZ simply lied to all their customers, claiming their issue had nothing to do with the SandForce issue that prompted Corsair to issue a recall, and can be fixed in firmware. Note that "their" firmware is just a renamed version of the SandForce firmware, because the chip manufacturer is the one who writes the firmware controlling the chip. However, after months of firmware updates the problem still occurs.

I haven't even applied the updates personally, I'm just going by the word of all the other people who say they've made no difference. This is because the firmware update process is obscene. They do NOT provide an update program that works from a CD or flash drive. This means that you have to remove the drive from your computer, install it in another Windows PC, and update it from that PC. Given the large number of firmware updates, that's a lot of times to ask a friend to borrow the inside of their computer.

It gets worse. At least some of the firmware updates are "destructive", meaning they erase all data on the drive. So you have to reinstall everything, or be savvy enough to make a disk image backup of your hard disk and then restore it after updating.

The SandForce 2281 problems aren't the fault of the companies selling the drives, although SandForce is a fairly modestly sized startup and they obviously can't afford to test their chips thoroughly enough. It's probably possible to fix the chip and manufacture updated versions within a couple of months, but there is zero public indication that SandForce has fixed the error.

In the future I will avoid all products using SandForce chips unless they've been in the market for many months without reported problems, because they have demonstrated they don't have the resources to properly verify and validate their products and address post-silicon bugs. It's not like this is the only bug found with their chip or drivers, but the others are small in comparison.

OCZ, on the other hand... I will never buy another OCZ product. Their "support" actively lies to customers to avoid doing a recall like their competition. They string everyone along with the promise that the next firmware update will fix it, really, despite that promise always turning out wrong. (Note: I have a little technical knowledge in this area, and suspect that if they could work around this bug in firmware it would probably involve slowing down the drive quite a bit, which would be incredibly unpopular with users who haven't encountered the bug).

I was *amazed* that a hard disk manufacturer doesn't offer a bootable update CD to update firmware without putting the drive in another machine. That is just nuts. In many years using many computers, I have never had to do that before.

I'm not going through firmware update hell. I am buying another SSD. This expensive choice will allow me to install it in my system and seamlessly transfer my files to the new drive. After that I will wait for a fix for the OCZ drive, and if one comes I will apply it or RMA it and give it to a friend or sell it for a modest amount.

SandForce 2281 based drives are unfortunately the fastest out there, but I am now buying the latest Intel drive (the 510) based on a Marvell chip. It is maybe 10-20% slower in benchmarks (via AnandTech), but Intel has a reputation for rock solid drives and they work to maintain it. They have a three year warranty on drives and have recently upgraded a smaller drive (the 320) to five years. A French reseller recently revealed that SSDs are returned to them at a 2-3% rate, except for Intel SSDs which are returned at about a 0.6% rate. The Crucial m4 is also based on the same Marvell chip used by the latest Intel drives. It benchmarks faster than the Intel drive, but Crucial doesn't have the 0.6% return rate. It's still competitive with the OCZ with much lower risk.

Oh, another annoyance: the drive's 3.5" mounting bracket lacked some of the standard screw holes that my case happens to require, and wouldn't fit into a 3.5 to 5.25 inch adapter I bought either. I had to buy a special 3.5" adapter and put that in the 5.25" adapter.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOOOOW, this drive is STUPID fast, April 18, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: OCZ Technology 240 GB Vertex 3 SATA III 6.0 Gb/s 2.5-Inch Solid State Drive VTX3-25SAT3-240G (Personal Computers)
I have a 2011 macbook pro 15". This laptop has the 6GB SATA III interface that works great with this drive. I just got the drive today immediately installed it. I have an OWC adapter on the way so I can put my old 750GB drive where the superdrive goes.

I installed OSX, updated, and then installed office 2011 and let it sync up my 400GB exchange mailbox. Then then testing began.

#%^^&$%& this drive is fast! For grins, I configured ALL office apps, safari, firefox all to open on startup. the machine boots in under 30 seconds and all of those apps are loaded before the desktop even appears!

What a great buy this drive was, and very easy to install!
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31 of 39 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not for the faint of heart! Unresolved problems with sleep and hibernate, September 24, 2011
As a user of OCZ Vertex 2 (40GB) SSD for 2 years, I blindingly chose to purchase the Vertex 3 for my new Intel Sandy Bridge build, as it appeared to be the fastest Sata 6 Gbps drive, and the reviews from tech websites gave me the impression of quality product. This was 4 months ago...

After installing Windows 7 SP1, with all the latest patches and drivers for my Intel DZ68DB motherboard, I experienced random freezes where the mouse cursor would stop moving, and occasionally I would be greeted with a bluescreen. I tried replacing the components that are likely to cause the video output to freeze, such as RAM, video card, and USB devices. Nothing fixed my problem, until I cloned my installation to a different SSD. I then realized the "video freeze" and bluescreen issues were directly from my Vertex 3 SSD, so I searched OCZ forums and contacted OCZ support.

OCZ support instructed me to update my already current BIOS and motherboard drivers, and recommended that I not use the Intel RST drivers (rather, I should use the Microsoft drivers). Their forums suggested updating to the latest firmware 2.11, which supposedly solves many bluescreen issues and other problems. After a two-week long back and forth conversation, the resolution was that sleep and hibernate modes were the root cause of my problems, and the fix was to not use sleep or hibernate, and that an RMA of the drive would not fix the issue (OCZ does not issue RMAs automatically, they must be approved internally). I was frustrated with this response, as I was now stuck with an SSD that could not even support power-saving modes that have been in computers for over 10 years.

A week after my conversation with OCZ, my motherboard manufacturer released a BIOS update with a different "OROM" (Option ROM/Intel RAID ROM), and this partially fixed my sleep and hibernate issues, but my system still crashing when transitioning from sleep to hibernate (this is the default Windows 7 power setting), which was the last straw. After some weeks of research, I have concluded that the failures are caused by the SandForce SF-2200 series controller being incompatible with Intel power management features. Incidentally, this SandForce chip is also present in the recalled Corsair Force 3 120GB series, but is not in either the Intel 510 Series or the Crucial M4 Series, as both SSDs use a Marvell controller. It may be the case that the issue is not with SandForce, but the fact remains that Intel and Crucial SSDs are performing flawlessly in Intel and AMD motherboard, indicating that Marvell's controller is much better.

I decided to purchase a Corsair M4 128GB SSD (it was $40 less than what I paid for the Vertex 3, and ~8GB larger). I copied my Win7 installation onto the new M4 SSD, and have been running without bluescreens, freezes, or any other trauma for two months. I can finally sleep or hibernate 3-5 times per day for weeks at a time (I only reboot when software updates force me to).

For the casual computer user, I HIGHLY recommend AVOIDING this drive (and possibly all drives containing a SandForce controller), because if you have issues, OCZ forums will tell you to install drivers in a certain order, not install certain other drivers, and update the SSD firmware using their Linux updater, before which the drive should be completely erased, all the while ensuring that specific BIOS settings that may not be available are set. If you still are having problems, they will recommend trying different cables, SATA ports, and AHCI drivers, passing the burden onto the customer. You will be much happier spending more $ to buy an Intel 510 SSD, or spending less $ to buy a Corsair M4 128GB SSD, as happiness does not have a price!
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So Fast! Here's how to upgrade., April 14, 2011
By 
oldtaku (San Diego, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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You want this bad boy as your boot drive - it's wasted on anything else. Though if you can afford RAIDing these just to hold your mp3 collection, go for it. This cut my Win7 boot time in half. Apps launch instantly. Win7 is smart enough to TRIM the drive and not page files that are on the drive, since it's just as easy to read them directly.

It'll still be fast under XP, but not as fast, and performance will degrade due to lack of TRIM support. And you want 6Gb SATA support on your motherboard for best performance, but even with 3Gb it'll be screaming. Normal drives waste almost all their time seeking around, this has zero seek time.

Edit: I had a section here on how to use Easeus Todo Backup to do the migration here, but H. Heller pointed out that this utility doesn't guarantee cluster alignment, which means you will have reduced performance. I got lucky since my desktop SSD ended up aligned, but that may not happen for you.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing...but read before you install, August 6, 2011
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This is an amazing drive. Incredibly fast.... So fast that when my friend turned it on from a full shut down- they thought that it had only woken up from sleep mode and not actually booted all the way up. Incredible...Super fast installs of applications, my CAD and CS5 software work incredibly faster especially in reading multi GB Photoshop files from this drive... My CAD software is set to automatically back up the files every few minutes and on my old spinning hard disk drive whenever it would backup the file, the application would freeze for a moment while it did its thing...With this SSD....the automatic backups are seamless and completely transparent with ZERO interruption to my work....

BEFORE YOU INSTALL....READ!!!!
IF YOU ARE INSTALLING THIS ON A NEW 2011 MACBOOK PRO with the newest generation of Intel Quad Core i5 or i7 processors DO NOT INSTALL THE TRIM ENABLER THAT HAS BEEN FLOATING AROUND ON THE INTERNET....this is a hack and not supported by Apple in ANY way. The trim enabler will cause your system to lock up momentarily or even completely. The drive has built in support for TRIM and really there is no major need for TRIM on the Mac OSX operating system anyway....Save hours of your time and just leave it be and it will be fantastic to use.
If and when apple supports TRIM for these drives then go ahead....but without their official support you are asking for trouble.

But again....LOVE THIS DRIVE....best upgrade.....also- check out an 8 GB Memory Upgrade from either Corsair or Crucial. Both companies offer great upgrades to these Macbook Pro 2011 hardwares and an 8GB upgrade actually boosts the native built in graphics chip from 384MB to 512MB.....this on all versions of the 2011 Macbook Pros that include the Intel Graphics 3000 chip.

Offers plenty of space for system files, BIG applications, and a fair amount of extra memory to store files you currently are working with that you need fast access to...I.E. Photoshop files, CAD files, graphics- but the 120GB really isn't enough to store all your iTunes, iPhotos, etc...so look into OptiBay or an external hard drive if you like to keep EVERYTHING with you.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blazing Fast Synchronous NAND, Zero Noise and Sandforce Issues Fixed, April 17, 2012
By 
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This is my first SSD. The most obvious reason for purchasing one is for it's amazing speed, but perhaps another reason that many people don't consider is the fact that these drives make virtually no noise. So far this drive has been everything I hoped it would be.

I read a lot of reviews after I purchased this product a couple months ago and I started to really worry about all the problems with the SandForce chip. Not to worry, the new drives being shipped have been updated with a fix because there was absolutely no issues at all when installing and running this drive. Also, I later learned the difference between asynchronous and synchronous NAND memory used in SSDs. I had no knowledge of this difference going into my purchase, but I was happy to know that this drive features synchronous NAND which is overall much faster in various tasks according to benchmarks in some reviews. Do a search and see for yourself...

PROS:
- Super Quiet operation (I'm just starting to realize how wonderful silent computing really is)
- Synchronous NAND memory at a cost not much more than models with asychronous NAND
(Do the research, its worth it to pay $10-$20 more for synchronous models--example: Vertex 3 (synchronous) vs Agility 3 (asynchronous) or Patriot PyroSE (synchronous) vs Patriot Pyro (asynchronous)--especially if there is a promotional rebate)
- Computer boots up to a useable state at Windows desktop in about 15 seconds
- 7.9 on Windows Experience Index (highest possible score)
- 3 year warranty

CONS:
- Only 55.7GB out of 60GB is useable (There is no avoiding it, but still...at this price you really want every last GB you can get.)

Two Tips For Using This Drive That You May Find (VERY) Helpful:

- If you plan on using SATA AHCI mode, then save yourself any possible headaches and/or fits of rage and make sure you enable AHCI mode for this drive using the motherboard BIOS BEFORE YOU INSTALL WINDOWS!!

- If you plan on using the 60GB model as a boot drive for Windows 7 you may be surprised that you end up with less free space than you expected due to Windows hibernation or sleep mode. This is because Windows will create a hidden file called Hiberfil.sys and it will be approximately the same size as the amount of RAM that you have installed. The computer uses the Hiberfil.sys file to store a copy of the system memory on the hard disk when the hybrid sleep setting is turned on. I have 16GB of RAM and I was dumbfounded that 16GB of space on my SSD was mysteriously missing. Since I don't plan on letting my computer go into hibernation (it's either on or off for me), I disabled hibernation which reclaimed approximately 16GB of SSD space.

NOTE: If you choose to do this, there is a Microsoft Support page that has more details and informs you step by step how to do it (it is a piece of cake and takes only seconds to type one command into the command console). If you are a little scared of using the command console then Microsoft also has a "Fix It For Me" tool which can disable and re-enable hibernation for you.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars All units are defective, DO NOT BUY, December 28, 2012
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We provide storage solutions for business use and I have to say these SSDs are nothing short of absolute rubbish. *Constantly* freezes it's SATA link then refuses to RESET until the power has been cycled. We've also seen 25% of the ones we have in production go bad within 6 months.

This is a KNOWN problem with the SandForce 2281 controller chip used in the Vertex 3 models, and OCZ fails to own up to the issue.. coward company.

To top it off the performance benchmarks portrayed are only realized due to compression of your data in the SandForce controller before it hits flash. Hit it with some rather uncompressible data and watch the scores drop.

Spend the extra couple bucks and go for a better brand that is worth your money.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Blindingly FAST Speeds--The 2nd Time Around -1st One FAILED!, July 2, 2011
By 
Wavey Davey (Southern CA, USA) - See all my reviews
First, the good news: OCZ has fixed the Sandforce 2281 controller in notebook environments, apparently, as my SSD use is an example of that: It's installed in an Asus G73SW-3DE laptop with the 6GB/sec SATA 3 interface. My first Vertex 3 failed outright, and there was no way to update the firmware, unfortunately also. I went to the OCZ web site, where I am a member, and asked of the experts the EXPERT's way to update the firmware in a notebook...listen to this sad story and weep, as the OCZ Toolkit still does not support updating where the SSD is the boot HD in a system, end of story.

It will be a good day when OCZ finally wakes up and hears the music and constructs a toolkit that works, and works in the Windows GUI! If Intel can figure out a way to update firmware in the Windows desktop then why can't OCZ do it? There are a plethora of notebook users out there today with the fabled SATA 3 interface, and there will be more as the days go on as it is the standard for high performance notebooks presently. Those notebook users, myself included, would surely like a way to update their SSD's and keep them current with up to date firmware, but we literally have no way to go there now the way things are.

For that reason, and the failure of my first Vertex 3 SSD, I am rating the SSD with three stars (3), as originally I had it rated at 4 stars, just deducting one star for the lack of a firmware update kit for notebooks. But overnight I've thought about it and I should have rated the SSD 3 stars all along, thus the review is hereby updated to reflect reality with the problem with updating and the failure accounting for a 2-star deduction.

The experts in the OCZ Forum showed me that you can make a Ubuntu Linux USB boot Flash Drive with the update tool inherent in the OS, which is true and nice for those which this system works for. I tried until I cried baby tears to do the update, but somehow Windows puts a lock on the SSD, EVEN IF YOU PHYSICALLY UNHOOK the SSD from the SATA bus, then re-attach it to break the "lock" the OS puts on the SSD...sad to say even that extreme technique failed miserably, and none of the experts at OCZ could figure out how to make the USB Ubuntu boot USB Flash Drive technique work in my notebook. I still have the USB flash drive with Ubuntu loaded on it, just for grins, and will undoubtedly find a use for it at some point.

That 1st Vertex 3 failed outright in the notebook about a week after the attempt to flash the SSD, no doubt it was going to fail in spite of getting flashed it turned out. The first couple hundred of the SSD's that were released for retail sale had a firmware bug in them, and the SSD's would seize up and freeze in the Windows GUI out of the blue, until finally the drive froze solid and left town for good! OCZ was very quick to replace the faulty SSD also, getting me a new drive drop-shipped out of China, where the SSDs are made apparently: it shipped China to Anchorage, Alaska, to Oakland CA, to Southern California in less than 36 hours, go figure! THAT was International Priority Dispatch Shipping all the way!! Nice job, OCZ!

I have been pleased with the performance of this 2nd SSD, as it has firmware 2.06 instead of 2.02 like the first drive had on it, but again, I have no way update the firmware in the notebook, so I am stuck for life unless I remove it from the notebook altogether and mount it into a desktop with a SATA 3 controller, and use it as a 2ndary drive of some kind, and then I can flash the SSD...or so they tell me! I am want to NOT go through any of that with my notebook's SSD, will just tough it out with the OEM firmware for the duration, and will hope for the best, sad to say.

In the higher register of file sizes (128KB and larger) I am getting the fabled 450-550MB/sec reads and 425-500MB/sec writes out of this SSD, and I've published one of the screen shots for ATTO Tools Benchmark of the SSD in action so you can all see for yourselves how fast it really is...and it IS realllly fast! There is no way to describe how rapid it is to the layperson, who has never used an SSD, but suffice to say it's literally twice as fast as a SATA 2 SSD, which is saying something big!

Launching a web page is a blink of an eye, and launching Adobe Photoshop in any iteration takes less than 10 seconds to full desktop status...for example. Calculations in the GUI are instantaneous also, such as for math programs or a graphics interface for 3D for example, all happens extra fast.

Of course there's no sound or phasing with an SSD so you don't know it's even working until you hit any key to launch a program or write something quickly, and it will be quickly I assure you. In short this is the biggest upgrade that can be had for a laptop, any laptop, even a SATA 2 laptop, but the real benefits come when you have an AHCI SATA 3 controller that does the 6GB/sec up front, and then you get to see stars!

I have no regrets about the failed laptop SSD, as I honestly expected something bad in that first batch of the Sandforce 2281 controller SSD's, and I was right on the $$ about things it turned out. I always caution about being an early adopter of new technology and this was no different. I had a full backup of my SSD and all media anyway, and this notebook has twin HD's so that I was covered 100% when it failed.

Overall I recommend this SSD for desktop and notebook use, both, no question this is a fine upgrade to do for your favorite toys! Let's just hope and pray that OCZ gets wise and writes a firmware update tool for notebooks, and any single-drive system for that matter...that is my only reservation for recommending the Vertex 3 SSD. Now that the price point is less than $200 after rebate it's time to GO GO GO! Get yourself one of these Vertex 3 SSD's like right now while the gettin's good!

Wavey Davey - 7-2-2011
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Extremely fast SSD with a regrettable flaw, November 11, 2011
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This review is from: OCZ Technology 240 GB Vertex 3 SATA III 6.0 Gb/s 2.5-Inch Solid State Drive VTX3-25SAT3-240G (Personal Computers)
This solid state drive does exactly what it is advertised as: Provide blazing fast speeds when used on a 6GB/s SATA connector. It's the fastest drive I've ever owned and I don't think I will ever be able to go back to traditional harddrive as my boot drive.

Physical installation was painless and easy, as expected from a modern drive of this form factor.

I use this drive as primary boot drive that holds my operating system (Windows 7/64bit) along with a select games and software such as Visual Studio and the performance improvement is very very noticeable. The most noticeable benefit so far has been moving my Star Wars: The Old Republic Beta installation to this drive. The results have been nothing short of amazing, with load times for changing planets as well as the occasional texture pop all but disappearing.

There's however a regrettable flaw with this drive:

Out of the box and even after updating it's firmware, my computer would hang and shortly thereafter crash about once per day, always during a write operation to the drive. The computer's BIOS would forget it's bootorder afterwards and require manual configuration to resurrect. Data was lost and corrupted during these crashes.

This is a serious issue and a bit of sleuthing on the internet confirms that it is relatively widespread. OCZ has not been forthcoming with support or even acknowledged the presence of the problem. While the presence of such a critical flaw should cause the product to be rated 1/5, the fact that I was able to find a solution for the problem (a registry modification to change certain settings for intel based storage controllers usually found in sandy-bridge mainboards) leads me to a 4/5 rating. The dramatically improved responsiveness of my computer alone makes me forgive and forget the significant time and headache this bug caused me until I found the solution.
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