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632 of 715 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Music that moves me
Previously, while browsing through the reviews, I noticed a common theme in the suprising amount of negative responses this album has gotten. The reviewers who wrote them seemed for some reason angry at the fact that so many people enjoy this album. I was appalled by the number of people who seemed to have no respect for other people's opinions. The thought that all...
Published on October 12, 2003 by Andrew J. Staudt

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Vinyl Quality Control
I don't understand the quality control in vinyl these days. They cost way above what they need to and don't deliver according to the high cost. To be fair, the sound, production, and mixing are all amazing. Very low surface noise, very dynamic sound... this album has never sounded more amazing! The issue is that side B and side D both are printed off center enough to...
Published on July 2, 2012 by C. Kelley


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632 of 715 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Music that moves me, October 12, 2003
By 
Andrew J. Staudt (Iowa City, IA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: OK Computer (Audio CD)
Previously, while browsing through the reviews, I noticed a common theme in the suprising amount of negative responses this album has gotten. The reviewers who wrote them seemed for some reason angry at the fact that so many people enjoy this album. I was appalled by the number of people who seemed to have no respect for other people's opinions. The thought that all the people are "just faking" liking the album to seem cool and hip is just absurd. They seem to be infuriated that many people seem to genuinly like something that they do not, and failing to realize that opinions are subjective, are drawn to the rash conclusion that everyone else is wrong, stupid, or "faking it". These people need to realize that it is ok not to like an album that many other people like. Please don't critisize others for their opinions, even if they differ from your own, for it is the exact nature of our free will that allows us to have differing thoughts and feelings when interpreting art, or anything for that matter. Without this gift, we would be nothing but mindless robots, without the freedom of choice or individual thought.
That being said, OK Computer is one of my favorite albums. Each track on the album has the ability of conjering up different emotions, and by the end, the emotional wirlwind leaves me dizzy. The album's central theme of encountering genuin beauty in our world of technology, yet being unable to shake a certain feeling of unease, comes across perfectly. It's funny that the people who are angered by this album may be the people it was really geared towards. It attempts to send the message that you don't have to be compliant all the time: treasure your individuality, don't let anyone take it away from you. At least that's what I got from this album, which brings the point across beautifully with it's layered sounds and melodic, peircing, and haunting vocals. I'm genuinly moved by this album everytime I listen to it. For those that think I'm saying this just to be hip, and cannnot and do not want anyone to have opinions different than their own, I'm with Tom Yorke in saying "We hope that you Choke."
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58 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Buy this for the extras but not for a new "remaster" or "remix" of OK Computer, September 24, 2009
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I just received my 2 CD/DVD package and can definitively say that there is no remixing or remastering of Radiohead's OK Computer album. This is not like Pearl Jam's reissue of Ten where there was both a remastering of the original audio, and remixing for an alternate listening experience. This is not like the recently released (and fantastic) Beatles stereo and mono remasters.

The music files for OK Computer are exactly the same as the existing OK Computer CD. Anyone saying "they hear a difference" is incorrect, or at least the effect is psycho-acoustic and not grounded in reality.

I have ripped the files directly onto my Mac (aiff, not compressed MP3 or AAC) and the file sizes are identical from the old CD to this one, down to the bit. I've also used the newest version of Soundtrack Pro on the Mac (part of the Logic Studio suite) to compare the waveform and frequency charts/graphs of the songs on both CDs. They are identical, same exact peaks and valleys, same volume, same frequency response. There is not even a volume difference as happens so often with "re-releases", where they just increase the volume on the newer CD. These files are identical in every way to the original CD. So if you're hoping to hear a new/improved/cleaner/different/etc. version of OK Computer, this is not what you'll get. You will get the exact same OK Computer songs you already own. To EMI/Parlophone's credit, they aren't even trying to pretend like it's a new mix/master, as the original 1997 copyright dates are on the OK Computer CD. No indication whatsoever of a newer mix or master made in 2008/9 at least on the OK Computer CD.

Having said that, if you (like me) did not have any of the songs on Disc 2, and you're interested in the video content on the DVD, then absolutely buy this set. The additional songs range, IMO, from good to great. For those who have never bought OK Computer, this set would be a great way to start. But for those who already have the original CD, and have collected the other songs on Disc 2, and are hoping for a better/cleaner/different recording on OK Computer, this is not what you'll get.
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211 of 251 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars God loves his children, yeah..., February 4, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: OK Computer (Audio CD)
If it is possible for (less than) an hour's worth of music to encapsulate all that is misguided, shallow and spiritually vacant about the foundations that modern Western society is built on, it is Radiohead's masterpiece, OK Computer. Intense, uncomfortable, dark and moving, OK Computer is the culmination of an incredible progression from the relative mediocrity of Pablo Honey, through the flawed brilliance of The Bends to an astounding third album which they may not be able to surpass. Apparently Thom Yorke almost went mad trying to decide the track order, but from the opening bars of Airbag, with it's uncomfortable, frankly bizarre, guitar line, to the microwave oven's ring that marks the end of The Tourist, the whole is incontestably a journey of the brain, the heart and the senses that seems to make perfect sense. The manic, Bohemian Rhapsodiesque apocalyptic soundtrack that is Paranoid Android still renders me speechless today. The pure beauty of the final chorus of Let Down, the frazzled mute trumpet solo on Climbing up the Walls, the fact that Johnny Greenwood seems to have reinvented the guitar and above all Thom Yorke's unutterably beautiful voice throughout, leaves you questioning quite where five middle class blokes from Oxford discovered the ability to move you so much. Before OK Computer, yuppies networking were an irritating banality. After OK Computer they are pure evil. My eyes have been opened...
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76 of 88 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Radiohead's best, October 11, 2002
By 
16x9 aspect ratio (Pico Rivera, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: OK Computer (Audio CD)
I agree with another reviewer that this CD deserves an average rating of 5 stars and not 4.5. This album is a masterpiece and will go down in history as one of the greats of the 90's. What's interesting about Radiohead is that they weren't as commercialy succesful as other bands from the 90's yet they remain one of the most powerful and original bands out there. Most people don't realize that after their monstrous hit "Creep" Radiohead produced their best music.
This indeed is an album and not just a collection of songs. From the first track "Airbag" all the way to the sixth track "Karma Police" the album flows seamlessly with emotional continuity and thought. Thom Yorke's lyrics are haunting and deeply symbolic. From rich layerd guitar sounds, out of this world keyboard riffs and of course Thom's unforgettable vocals the sound of this album is unforgettable. I must have listened to this CD hundeds of times and it never gets old because there is always something new for me to discover. What's great about OK Computer is that it combines the experimentation of Kid A and Amnesiac and the brilliant guitar work of The Bends. Ok Computer won't disappoint and belongs in your music library.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars hey man slow down, March 29, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I am reacting to the negative reviews calling for remastering. Be careful what you wish for. 90ies technolgy already was highly advanced and Rhs CDs in general sound very good. You can play them loud and at lower volume and they sound good. I've gone through updating many of my 50-60 jazz CDs and in those cases it is amazing what could be done since they were first thrown on the market in the late 80ies. But what should a remastered Rh Cd sound like? Stronger bass, greater volume at high frequencies? I don't think you'd be looking for that. Thing is, Rh came along when the technology was advanced and they utilized it to their ability and artistic views. I am very pleased with what we have and find these expanded reissues a welcome, albeit costly addition. Yes, money is being made of us, but with these reissues something of value is being offered. And it is up each individual to make his or her mind to go for it. Don't dish this just because you have a hangup.

For anyone liking OK Computer and wondering if the extra CD is worth it: The music collected from contemporary EPs is very good, not quite as great as the original album, but very enjoyable.
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36 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Radiohead Are Worth It, October 28, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: OK Computer (Audio CD)
Can it really be 7 years and three albums since I began college and adopted "Creep" as my personal anthem of alienation? Forget Thom Yorke; that song was about ME, damnit-LOL! I heard it and projected my own angst and depression onto the lyrics.
However, I have to admit that, following the success of "Creep", I didn't pay much attention to Radiohead. "The Bends" came and went, and the only song I liked from that record was "High and Dry".
Then came 1997 and "Ok Computer". Rave reviews and the standout singles "Karma Police" and "No Surprises" piqued my curiosity, which finally got the better of me when I finally went out and bought the album. Upon first listen, I was far from impressed. Aside from the aforementioned singles, I liked "Subterranean Homesick Alien" on the level that one likes any old radio single (i.e., it was catchy, and caused me to hit repeat on my CD player several times). But the rest of the album seemed, somehow, unreachable.
Fast forward a few months later, when I popped OKC into my CD player again, and listened to it from start to finish for the first time since I bought it. Where before, I found the jolting guitar at the start of "Airbag" disconcerting, I now took comfort in it. Suddenly, I was able to see the epic beauty of "Paranoid Android". "Subterranean Homesick Alien" became more than just another radio song; I finally heard and understood the simultaneous tranquility and desperation in its lyrics (Yorke makes alien abduction sound like quite the sublime experience). "Exit (Music For A Film)" and "Let Down" proved exquisite in both their pain and their majesty. And, on "Lucky" and "The Tourist" I found songs in which I could literally lose myself. Most importantly, I found a moment in each song that touched my soul (when Thom Yorke sings "it's going to be a glorious day" for the second time on "Lucky"; or when the chanting begins on "Paranoid Android"; or Yorke's sweet scream of "you'll know where you are" near the end of "Let Down"). Now, I understood what all that raving was about at the end of 1997, when critics tripped over themselves to praise this album as one of the decade's best. It would be another four or five listens before I could fully process the thematic content of the lyrics on the album. Once I did, the power of the album truly struck me. On OKC, Radiohead vocalize the anxieties we all share about living in this microwaved age, but are too scared or deadened to verbalize ourselves. Are we sacrificing our humanity at the altar of technological advancement? Radiohead seem to reach a pretty bleak conclusion on OKC, but, in the end, the album moved me so much that I bought "The Bends", an equally stunning gem. As with OKC, it took me a few listens to get into "The Bends", but the thing I've come to love about Radiohead's music is its very inaccessibility. It is NOT easy. It is (to employ an overused critical term) DIFFICULT.
But I'm finally starting to understand that Radiohead are worth it. Worth the hype. Worth the pretension (real or perceived). Worth a permanent place in any album collection. Worth more than just one listen. Worth the work it takes to fully comprehend their albums. Most of all, Radiohead are worth the hope that rock music can do more than entertain, and even move. Radiohead are proof that rock music can still challenge our comfortable existence (see "Fitter Happier"), question our most deeply held beliefs, and leave us thinking long after the last note has played.
I affectionately call "OK Computer" my learning album. I had to learn to love it, and I would not have had it any other way.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Radiohead Are Worth It, October 26, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: OK Computer (Audio CD)
Can it really be 7 years and three albums since I began college and adopted "Creep" as my personal anthem of alienation? Forget Thom Yorke; that song was about ME, damnit-LOL! I heard it and projected my own angst and depression onto the lyrics.
However, I have to admit that, following the success of "Creep", I didn't pay much attention to Radiohead. "The Bends" came and went, and the only song I liked from that record was "High and Dry".
Then came 1997 and "Ok Computer". Rave reviews and the standout singles "Karma Police" and "No Surprises" piqued my curiosity, which finally got the better of me when I finally went out and bought the album. Upon first listen, I was far from impressed. Aside from the aforementioned singles, I liked "Subterranean Homesick Alien" on the level that one likes any old radio single (i.e., it was catchy, and caused me to hit repeat on my CD player several times). But the rest of the album seemed, somehow, unreachable.
Fast forward a few months later, when I popped OKC into my CD player again, and listened to it from start to finish for the first time since I bought it. Where before, I found the jolting guitar at the start of "Airbag" disconcerting, I now took comfort in it. Suddenly, I was able to see the epic beauty of "Paranoid Android". "Subterranean Homesick Alien" became more than just another radio song; I finally heard and understood the simultaneous tranquility and desperation in its lyrics (Yorke makes alien abduction sound like quite the sublime experience). "Exit (Music For A Film)" and "Let Down" proved exquisite in both their pain and their majesty. And, on "Lucky" and "The Tourist" I found songs in which I could literally lose myself. Most importantly, I found a moment in each song that touched my soul (when Thom Yorke sings "it's going to be a glorious day" for the second time on "Lucky"; or when the chanting begins on "Paranoid Android"; or Yorke's sweet scream of "you'll know where you are" near the end of "Let Down"). Now, I understood what all that raving was about at the end of 1997, when critics tripped over themselves to praise this album as one of the decade's best. It would be another four or five listens before I could fully process the thematic content of the lyrics on the album. Once I did, the power of the album truly struck me. On OKC, Radiohead vocalize the anxieties we all share about living in this microwaved age, but are too scared or deadened to verbalize ourselves. Are we sacrificing our humanity at the altar of technological advancement? Radiohead seem to reach a pretty bleak conclusion on OKC, but, in the end, the album moved me so much that I bought "The Bends", an equally stunning gem. As with OKC, it took me a few listens to get into "The Bends", but the thing I've come to love about Radiohead's music is its very inaccessibility. It is NOT easy. It is (to employ an overused critical term) DIFFICULT.
But I'm finally starting to understand that Radiohead are worth it. Worth the hype. Worth the pretension (real or perceived). Worth a permanent place in any album collection. Worth more than just one listen. Worth the work it takes to fully comprehend their albums. Most of all, Radiohead are worth the hope that rock music can do more than entertain, and even move. Radiohead are proof that rock music can still challenge our comfortable existence (see "Fitter Happier"), question our most deeply held beliefs, and leave us thinking long after the last note has played.
I affectionately call "OK Computer" my learning album. I had to learn to love it, and I would not have had it any other way.
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars you are a funny boy, August 5, 2003
By 
Allan (Georgia (it's a state if you didn't already know)) - See all my reviews
This review is from: OK Computer (Audio CD)
Please excuse me while I bash a previous reviewer. to "The Cranky Reviewer": I feel the need to clarify a few things for you. Radiohead is the greatest musical occurence in contemporary music. They are not here to please your simple ears and mind. They know how to write, and they know how to play, and do both exeptionally well. If you had the mental capacity to listen to and understand the music in an intelligent way, you would find that it is the most brilliantly crafted, carefully and emotionally constructed music available. THIS IS NOT DANCE MUSIC, NOR IS IT MEANT TO BE. IF YOU WANT TO LISTEN TO DANCE MUSIC, BUY A F***ING DANCE CD. Thanks for your time and generous ignorance. I have been thoroughly amused by your petty and insignificant presence here - Allan
p.s. good luck with your duran duran
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is what perfection sounds like., June 7, 2000
By 
Ben (Louisville, Kentucky) - See all my reviews
This review is from: OK Computer (Audio CD)
I'm 19. Male. Jaded. I've heard it all (most of it) before, and have come to love such high-concept masterpieces as Dark Side of the Moon, mind-opening acts like The Doors, as well as the classics of contemporary music, namely PJ Harvey's To Bring You My Love, Nirvana's Nevermind, and... say... Bjork's Debut.
But I have never heard anything as atmospheric, sophisticated, and musically rewarding as Radiohead's undeniable masterpiece, OK COMPUTER. Every song on it is perfect. Thom Yorke and the boys create dimensions and soundscapes that haven't been touched before, and they do it on every track. From the unusual time signature of the opening track Airbag, to the lush harmonies of the sweeping epic Paranoid Android, to the band's haunting ode to the boomerang of disappointment, Karma Police, to the stark sonic landscapes of The Tourist, the album simply blooms. Radiohead has made more than a contribution to music; they have laid down the law of where music has been, where it is, and where it will go. There are sounds on this record that will be embedded into your memory on the very first listen, and some songs that will elude you until you are ready to receive them, and trust me, you will. If you listen carefully.
Do not presume to judge this record on its critical raves alone, or by your own comparative analysis. They did not make an easy, or easily definable, record. Instead, they chose the more difficult, and infinitely more rewarding road of making a moody, dark, sad concept album.
And the concept should at least be clear: Radiohead seek to dislodge all your utopian ideas of freedom and control in a world of fast-paced, internet-obsessed culture. Obviously, there is little joy here, but OK Computer does not pretend to be anything it is not. An aural 1984, OK Computer celebrates nothing, but for all its Orwellian anxiety, it still comes off as a beautiful, and eloquent, journey. Please do not let yourself be too close-minded, or scared, to take it.
Please feel free to respond. As Ok Computer demonstrates so beautifully, this world is nothing without a little scrutiny.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Future Is Here And It Sounds Something Like This�, January 20, 2000
By 
David (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: OK Computer (Audio CD)
Thom Yorke sounds sick. Sick of the society we live in that is. A bleak, unpromising society so full of technology, mass transportation, pollution, and anxiety that there is little room for anything else, At least this is the picture Radiohead present to us with their third album, "OK Computer".
Listening to "Paranoid Android" we get a disturbing sense of what it is like to live in this nightmare world. Recorded in three parts this track is a perfect showcase for the album's complex and multi-layered sound.
In "Let Down" everyday existence is reduced to its most banal form: 'Starting and then stopping/Taking off and landing/The emptiest of feelings'. Things don't seem to get any better by the time we get to "No Surprises" as Yorke sings of 'A job that slowly kills you', and of 'Bruises that won't heal'. "Exit Music", one of the album's slower tracks is an exquisite, moving tale of young love and freedom.
"OK Computer" is more about escape than about resignation. It is about finding a place to belong, preferably away from the technological nightmare that surrounds us. In "Subterranean Homesick Alien" Yorke hopes that aliens will: 'Take me on board their beautiful ship, show me the world as I'd love to see it.'
Dark, brooding, and constantly full of surprises, "OK Computer" is a tense record that pushes rock music's boundaries in all directions. The sound of the future is here and Radiohead have kindly captured it in all its unpleasantness for us. Thank you Radiohead.
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OK Computer
OK Computer by Radiohead (Audio CD - 1997)
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