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O'Keeffe and Stieglitz: An American Romance Hardcover – April 1, 1991


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 546 pages
  • Publisher: Nan A. Talese; 1st edition (April 1, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385261225
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385261227
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.5 x 2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #284,423 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In Eisler's reckoning, the union of Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986), young, ambitious Texas schoolteacher, and famous New York photographer/art impresario Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946) was a collusion, a system of deals and trade-offs, love and friendship, with each partner fueling the other's creativity. O'Keeffe, on whom Stieglitz projected oceanic feelings, was relegated to the role of geriatric nurse when husband Stieglitz tomcatted around with his new muse, Dorothy Norman, more than 40 years his junior. O'Keeffe, meanwhile, pursued a lesbian relationship with painter Rebecca Strand. Her husband, photographer Paul Strand, was a protege of autocratic Stieglitz and would later rebel against this surrogate father. Packed with personal revelations, thick with sexual affairs, this intimate, enthralling dual portrait demythologizes the iconic couple of the American art world, exposing the troubled realities beneath the public personae each skillfully wore. Eisler's books include Class Act: America's Last Dirty Secret. Photos.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Introducing modernism to the New York art world, photographer Alfred Stieglitz was impresario to such notable American artists and photographers as John Marin, Paul Strand, Charles Demuth, and Marsden Hartley. In 1916 Georgia O'Keeffe became the only woman admitted to this exclusive art circle. An intense love affair with her mentor ensued. Using unpublished letters and papers, and assisted by those who knew the subjects, Eisler portrays intimate details of the couple's relationship and all manner of liaisons with others. Their eroticism was often expressed in their vast artistic output. Eisler also wrote the introductory essay to Lovingly, Georgia (S. & S., 1990), which is a compilation of the correspondence between O'Keeffe and Anita Pollitzer. Though the details of their liaisons become repetitive, specialists will be interested in the newly researched material, and libraries with strong reader interest in O'Keeffe and Steiglitz will want this as well. (Illustrations not seen.)-- Joan Levin, Indian Trails P.L., Wheeling, Ill.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By annadams@home.com on August 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
An amazing insight into the lives of two of America's great artists of this century. Thanks to the fine research of the author and the fact that so many important people in the lives of O'Keeffe and Stieglitz corresponded by letter and, more importantly, saved the letters, we are able to share many moments in their personal and professional lives in NYC, at Lake George and in New Mexico. Their psychological development over time and the effect of that on their work and their relationship is fairly mind boggling. One problem, the author never really explains what it is about Stieglitz that makes O'Keeffe love him and keeps her tied to him.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 8, 1998
Format: Paperback
I got this book as a gift. It is a little intimidating in size but is a fascinating look at the extraordinary flawed lives of these two individuals. It sounds cliche but it is very hard to put down. In part I think it has such an "inside" nature to it due to the prolific letter writers involved. Everyone wrote, and luckily seemed to save all their correspondence. The look at the New York Art world in the 1920's is such a bonus.
A great book!
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11 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jim Ball on June 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
I'm a realist when it comes to human beings, holding no illusions about how cruel we can be. But after reading this book I wish I had not read it. Either I buy into Eisler's portrait of O'Keefe and Stieglitz -- which consistently paints them as self-centered persons who nearly qualify as anti-social personalities -- or I assume that Eisler's presentation borders on slander. Most of the content of the book appears to be there to justify the author's "psychological" conclusions about their personalities. This leads me to question what is actually driving the presentation -- the sources or Eisler's harsh theory about their personalities. There were so few instances where you would find an instance where they were presented in a favorable light that it leaves me wondering, "Were they this unredeemable, or is this a simplistic reduction that has not sufficiently presented the complex nature of their personalities?" Since this is the only book I've read about them, I have nothing to compare it to. Eisler could be dead on and fair. Frankly, I hope not.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Detailed and informative book about the blow-by-blow account of the lives of two very important American Artists. They turn out to be the most awful people, but human. You wouldn't want to turn your back on either but you won't be able to turn your eyes away either. Must-have for fans.
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