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9
votes
Flawlessly. Most regular DVDs are upgraded to 1080p by the phenomenal processor. I have both regular dvds and bluerays of the same movie, and the major difference from blu-rays is in the audio. This replaced my Sony ES series Blu-ray that was very fussy about what it would play (no scratches or copies, please). Never had a disk fail in this machine that wasn't hopelessly damaged. After I bought this machine, I retired a Proceed CD player ($1500) that I've had for 15 years, because nothing sounded as good. The Oppo does. This is only my experience, that's all I can provide.
Apr 16, 2014 by SGAseattle
6
votes
It depends on whether the audiophile actually listens with his ears and is not biassed by the fact that there is a more expensive unit that is supposed to be slightly "better" (the BDP-105). In other words, if the audiophile must spend the most money to be happy, he will not be happy with this unit's sound, but otherwise, he will. The HDMI audio performance of the more expensive BDP-105 is IDENTICAL to the BDP-103 (OPPO's wording is: "the BDP-103 and BDP-105 are identical in performance when it comes to audio and video over HDMI"); it is ONLY if you hook it up via the analog connectors that any audio difference is possible, and even then, OPPO only suggests it for people "who do a great deal of critical music listening using a very high end, analog connected system". http://www.oppodigital.com/KnowledgeBase.aspx?KBID=37 But, frankly, I do not know of anyone who has properly conducted double blind listening tests to show that the differences are actually audible in any instance. I'll bet there is more than one fool "audiophile" who bought the more expensive BDP-105 and hooked it up via HDMI and imagines that it sounds better than the BDP-103.
Oct 19, 2013 by What's in a name?
3
votes
From Oppo Support: "Universal means that the player will support all standard media formats, can output in PAL and NTSC and do PAL<->NTSC conversions, and has a power supply that can be used in any region of the world. What the player is not is Universal Disc Region. Licensing requires that we lock the player to DVD Region 1 and Blu-ray Region A. Any region free playback will require hardware modifications which we do not support." It could be more clearly stated on their website.
Dec 29, 2014 by Highstream
1
vote
Haven't really used so many DVD-Rs for my answer to be really conclusive, but I've used some with no problems at all. Hope this could help.
Aug 15, 2014 by tony estephan
1
vote
I don't know about Region Free, mine was already set up for Region 1 which I believe is the US. I hope that helps. I think is coded by where the player is sent to..
Oct 3, 2014 by Joe R.
1
vote
Depends on you TV not your bd player.
Feb 26, 2014 by Stuart Anderson
1
vote
No
Nov 22, 2014 by Ann
1
vote
No it is US zone locked.
Jun 30, 2014 by Jagshere
1
vote
is it wi fi? Aug 22, 2014
Yes.
Aug 22, 2014 by T.Wilson
1
vote
amazon Oct 12, 2013
oops, but Oppo will sell you a discounted 'stick' that will do most all of the streaming services
Oct 12, 2013 by SGAseattle
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