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(What's The Story) Morning Glory?, 1995 Pre-order the remastered album from the Oasis store http://t.co/pMsPoidU7l http://t.co/zhDAVYBJDm


At a Glance

Formed: 1991 (23 years ago)
Split: Aug 29 2009 (4 years ago)


Biography

“In 20 years’ time, people will buy Definitely Maybe and listen to it for what it was. That’s what is important.” Noel Gallagher, August 1994.

Remarkably confident words from a guitarist on the eve of his band’s debut album release. But Oasis were always certain in their abilities – and the public were just as clear the five-piece were on the right track.

Let’s get the statistics out of the way. On its release in August 1994, Definitely Maybe sold a record-breaking 86,000 copies in its first week, the highest first-week sales for a debut album in Britain. It has since gone on to sell 5 ... Read more

“In 20 years’ time, people will buy Definitely Maybe and listen to it for what it was. That’s what is important.” Noel Gallagher, August 1994.

Remarkably confident words from a guitarist on the eve of his band’s debut album release. But Oasis were always certain in their abilities – and the public were just as clear the five-piece were on the right track.

Let’s get the statistics out of the way. On its release in August 1994, Definitely Maybe sold a record-breaking 86,000 copies in its first week, the highest first-week sales for a debut album in Britain. It has since gone on to sell 5 million around the world. Over the course of their eight albums until disbanding in 2009, Oasis sold over 70 million albums.
More importantly, the songs sound as fresh and relevant today as they did 20 years ago. A hunger to escape will always sound vital, especially if it’s sung as mesmerically as Liam Gallagher and written with the urgency of Liam’s older brother Noel. Its four singles – Supersonic, Shakermaker, Live Forever and Cigarettes And Alcohol – are established classics. Even more impressively, songs that were never released outside of the album’s confines such as Rock ‘N’ Roll Star and Slide Away also remain anthems and radio staples known to every generation of music fan.

For all the songs’ seemingly indestructible power, Oasis had a stuttering start. Formed in 1991 as The Rain – named after a Beatles B-side and a nod to their Manchester hometown’s infamously wet weather – guitarist Paul “Bonehead” Arthurs, bassist Paul “Guigsy” McGuigan and drummer Tony McCarroll recruited Bonehead’s friend Liam Gallagher as singer. Liam and Bonehead wrote the songs but, not out of their teens, their tunes were raw to say the least. Or “shit”, as Liam himself later admitted.

Meanwhile, Noel was drifting along. A former fish-tank maker, signwriter, baker’s assistant and labourer, by his mid-twenties Noel was a roadie for Madchester staples Inspiral Carpets. He befriended the Inspirals’ live soundman Mark Coyle which meant that, once the band’s gear was set up, they had hours to practice their own songs in respectable venues before the Inspirals turned up.

Mark had a studio in his bedroom and, once they returned from touring, Noel would play him his now-finished songs. They contained all the passion and desire of a writer determined not to let his life drift away. “I was gobsmacked at how good they were,” recalls Mark. “Once I heard them, I said to Noel: ‘It’s my job to produce these songs. This isn’t even up for discussion, I’m doing it.’”

Unaware that Noel was writing such great tunes, Liam asked his brother to become The Rain’s manager. Noel had a better idea: playing the band his songs, he suggested he join as lead guitarist and choose these future classics as their setlist. Oasis were born.
In January 1992, the five-piece played their first gig at respected Manchester venue The Boardwalk. They rehearsed endlessly there too. “We knew the songs inside-out,” says Bonehead. “That’s where we put the legwork in, as a gang of mates.”

Oasis recorded a demo tape with Coyle at a backstreet Liverpool studio, but only pressed eight copies: they didn’t need it. In May 1993, Oasis played fourth on the bill at Glasgow club King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut to 18 Wheeler, a band signed to Creation, the lauded independent label of Primal Scream, My Bloody Valentine and Teenage Fanclub. Creation boss Alan McGee was only there early by mistake. “The first song was great, but I was drunk and drugged, so I didn’t know if it was just that,” he said. “But by the third song I was, ‘I’m doing it.’ After the show, I went up to Noel and said: ‘I’m Alan McGee, do you want a record deal?’”

Despite having such great songs, capturing the band’s ferocious energy proved a challenge. Initial sessions at Monnow Valley studio in the Welsh countryside were disappointing. Placed with Dave Batchelor, a veteran producer of ‘70s acts such as The Sensational Alex Harvey Band and The Skids, the age gap and his overly-technical methods jarred with a band only used to playing live. “We played our parts right,” says Bonehead. “But Dave wasn’t familiar with us as people or as musicians.”

They relocated to Sawmills studio in Cornwall, so remote that the band had to get a boat to the local pub. Production duties were now in the hands of Mark Coyle and the band, deciding that the obvious solution was to set the band up and play as they would in concert. “We were really relaxed and comfortable,” says Bonehead, who spent his spare time canoeing on the estuary next to the studio with Liam. “We had our friend Mark behind the desk, pressing the big red Record button.”

Within a fortnight, Definitely Maybe was recorded. Its 11 songs flowed perfectly, from the swaggering statement of intent on the opening Rock ‘N’ Roll Star to Married With Children’s closing moment of calm. The producers’ studio inexperience showed in places, which mixer Owen Morris did the perfect job of rescuing. In Coyle’s words: “Owen chopped and edited, until he brought it to life.”

Creation sent out a demo version of the snarling Columbia to industry tastemakers in December 1993. Only intended to cause a buzz among critics, they were taken aback when Radio 1 playlisted it. Here was the first affirmation that Oasis’ music just couldn’t be contained.

By the time Supersonic was released as their proper debut single in April 1994, incendiary gigs meant the public were aware that – backed by a trio of musicians in Bonehead, Guigsy and McCarroll who were, to quote Liam, “tight as fuck” – the Gallaghers were incredible musicians and riotously funny superstars. The world needed Oasis… and those 86,000 first week sales snowballed very quickly indeed.

Barely a year later, second album (What’s The Story?) Morning Glory cemented Oasis’ rise to become one of the biggest bands in the world. Once again, in addition to singles like Wonderwall and Don’t Look Back In Anger, album-only tracks such as Champagne Supernova, became timeless classics. Concerts at Knebworth in August 1996 have become the stuff of legend, all 250,000 tickets for Oasis’ two shows snapped up instantly in the days before online ticket sales.

Third album Be Here Now smashed sales records, its 650,000 first week sales still Britain’s fastest-selling album. Oasis continued to routinely sell out stadiums, headline festivals and top charts. All eight albums reached No 1 and they scored eight chart-topping singles, as songs such as Little By Little, Songbird, The Importance Of Being Idle and Lyla joined their list of calls-to-arms universal anthems.

So we can talk about sales figures, how Oasis changed the face of music and how their songs continue to influence generations of new musicians. Or, if you want to know Oasis’ real power, we could just suggest you start by playing Definitely Maybe.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

“In 20 years’ time, people will buy Definitely Maybe and listen to it for what it was. That’s what is important.” Noel Gallagher, August 1994.

Remarkably confident words from a guitarist on the eve of his band’s debut album release. But Oasis were always certain in their abilities – and the public were just as clear the five-piece were on the right track.

Let’s get the statistics out of the way. On its release in August 1994, Definitely Maybe sold a record-breaking 86,000 copies in its first week, the highest first-week sales for a debut album in Britain. It has since gone on to sell 5 million around the world. Over the course of their eight albums until disbanding in 2009, Oasis sold over 70 million albums.
More importantly, the songs sound as fresh and relevant today as they did 20 years ago. A hunger to escape will always sound vital, especially if it’s sung as mesmerically as Liam Gallagher and written with the urgency of Liam’s older brother Noel. Its four singles – Supersonic, Shakermaker, Live Forever and Cigarettes And Alcohol – are established classics. Even more impressively, songs that were never released outside of the album’s confines such as Rock ‘N’ Roll Star and Slide Away also remain anthems and radio staples known to every generation of music fan.

For all the songs’ seemingly indestructible power, Oasis had a stuttering start. Formed in 1991 as The Rain – named after a Beatles B-side and a nod to their Manchester hometown’s infamously wet weather – guitarist Paul “Bonehead” Arthurs, bassist Paul “Guigsy” McGuigan and drummer Tony McCarroll recruited Bonehead’s friend Liam Gallagher as singer. Liam and Bonehead wrote the songs but, not out of their teens, their tunes were raw to say the least. Or “shit”, as Liam himself later admitted.

Meanwhile, Noel was drifting along. A former fish-tank maker, signwriter, baker’s assistant and labourer, by his mid-twenties Noel was a roadie for Madchester staples Inspiral Carpets. He befriended the Inspirals’ live soundman Mark Coyle which meant that, once the band’s gear was set up, they had hours to practice their own songs in respectable venues before the Inspirals turned up.

Mark had a studio in his bedroom and, once they returned from touring, Noel would play him his now-finished songs. They contained all the passion and desire of a writer determined not to let his life drift away. “I was gobsmacked at how good they were,” recalls Mark. “Once I heard them, I said to Noel: ‘It’s my job to produce these songs. This isn’t even up for discussion, I’m doing it.’”

Unaware that Noel was writing such great tunes, Liam asked his brother to become The Rain’s manager. Noel had a better idea: playing the band his songs, he suggested he join as lead guitarist and choose these future classics as their setlist. Oasis were born.
In January 1992, the five-piece played their first gig at respected Manchester venue The Boardwalk. They rehearsed endlessly there too. “We knew the songs inside-out,” says Bonehead. “That’s where we put the legwork in, as a gang of mates.”

Oasis recorded a demo tape with Coyle at a backstreet Liverpool studio, but only pressed eight copies: they didn’t need it. In May 1993, Oasis played fourth on the bill at Glasgow club King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut to 18 Wheeler, a band signed to Creation, the lauded independent label of Primal Scream, My Bloody Valentine and Teenage Fanclub. Creation boss Alan McGee was only there early by mistake. “The first song was great, but I was drunk and drugged, so I didn’t know if it was just that,” he said. “But by the third song I was, ‘I’m doing it.’ After the show, I went up to Noel and said: ‘I’m Alan McGee, do you want a record deal?’”

Despite having such great songs, capturing the band’s ferocious energy proved a challenge. Initial sessions at Monnow Valley studio in the Welsh countryside were disappointing. Placed with Dave Batchelor, a veteran producer of ‘70s acts such as The Sensational Alex Harvey Band and The Skids, the age gap and his overly-technical methods jarred with a band only used to playing live. “We played our parts right,” says Bonehead. “But Dave wasn’t familiar with us as people or as musicians.”

They relocated to Sawmills studio in Cornwall, so remote that the band had to get a boat to the local pub. Production duties were now in the hands of Mark Coyle and the band, deciding that the obvious solution was to set the band up and play as they would in concert. “We were really relaxed and comfortable,” says Bonehead, who spent his spare time canoeing on the estuary next to the studio with Liam. “We had our friend Mark behind the desk, pressing the big red Record button.”

Within a fortnight, Definitely Maybe was recorded. Its 11 songs flowed perfectly, from the swaggering statement of intent on the opening Rock ‘N’ Roll Star to Married With Children’s closing moment of calm. The producers’ studio inexperience showed in places, which mixer Owen Morris did the perfect job of rescuing. In Coyle’s words: “Owen chopped and edited, until he brought it to life.”

Creation sent out a demo version of the snarling Columbia to industry tastemakers in December 1993. Only intended to cause a buzz among critics, they were taken aback when Radio 1 playlisted it. Here was the first affirmation that Oasis’ music just couldn’t be contained.

By the time Supersonic was released as their proper debut single in April 1994, incendiary gigs meant the public were aware that – backed by a trio of musicians in Bonehead, Guigsy and McCarroll who were, to quote Liam, “tight as fuck” – the Gallaghers were incredible musicians and riotously funny superstars. The world needed Oasis… and those 86,000 first week sales snowballed very quickly indeed.

Barely a year later, second album (What’s The Story?) Morning Glory cemented Oasis’ rise to become one of the biggest bands in the world. Once again, in addition to singles like Wonderwall and Don’t Look Back In Anger, album-only tracks such as Champagne Supernova, became timeless classics. Concerts at Knebworth in August 1996 have become the stuff of legend, all 250,000 tickets for Oasis’ two shows snapped up instantly in the days before online ticket sales.

Third album Be Here Now smashed sales records, its 650,000 first week sales still Britain’s fastest-selling album. Oasis continued to routinely sell out stadiums, headline festivals and top charts. All eight albums reached No 1 and they scored eight chart-topping singles, as songs such as Little By Little, Songbird, The Importance Of Being Idle and Lyla joined their list of calls-to-arms universal anthems.

So we can talk about sales figures, how Oasis changed the face of music and how their songs continue to influence generations of new musicians. Or, if you want to know Oasis’ real power, we could just suggest you start by playing Definitely Maybe.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

“In 20 years’ time, people will buy Definitely Maybe and listen to it for what it was. That’s what is important.” Noel Gallagher, August 1994.

Remarkably confident words from a guitarist on the eve of his band’s debut album release. But Oasis were always certain in their abilities – and the public were just as clear the five-piece were on the right track.

Let’s get the statistics out of the way. On its release in August 1994, Definitely Maybe sold a record-breaking 86,000 copies in its first week, the highest first-week sales for a debut album in Britain. It has since gone on to sell 5 million around the world. Over the course of their eight albums until disbanding in 2009, Oasis sold over 70 million albums.
More importantly, the songs sound as fresh and relevant today as they did 20 years ago. A hunger to escape will always sound vital, especially if it’s sung as mesmerically as Liam Gallagher and written with the urgency of Liam’s older brother Noel. Its four singles – Supersonic, Shakermaker, Live Forever and Cigarettes And Alcohol – are established classics. Even more impressively, songs that were never released outside of the album’s confines such as Rock ‘N’ Roll Star and Slide Away also remain anthems and radio staples known to every generation of music fan.

For all the songs’ seemingly indestructible power, Oasis had a stuttering start. Formed in 1991 as The Rain – named after a Beatles B-side and a nod to their Manchester hometown’s infamously wet weather – guitarist Paul “Bonehead” Arthurs, bassist Paul “Guigsy” McGuigan and drummer Tony McCarroll recruited Bonehead’s friend Liam Gallagher as singer. Liam and Bonehead wrote the songs but, not out of their teens, their tunes were raw to say the least. Or “shit”, as Liam himself later admitted.

Meanwhile, Noel was drifting along. A former fish-tank maker, signwriter, baker’s assistant and labourer, by his mid-twenties Noel was a roadie for Madchester staples Inspiral Carpets. He befriended the Inspirals’ live soundman Mark Coyle which meant that, once the band’s gear was set up, they had hours to practice their own songs in respectable venues before the Inspirals turned up.

Mark had a studio in his bedroom and, once they returned from touring, Noel would play him his now-finished songs. They contained all the passion and desire of a writer determined not to let his life drift away. “I was gobsmacked at how good they were,” recalls Mark. “Once I heard them, I said to Noel: ‘It’s my job to produce these songs. This isn’t even up for discussion, I’m doing it.’”

Unaware that Noel was writing such great tunes, Liam asked his brother to become The Rain’s manager. Noel had a better idea: playing the band his songs, he suggested he join as lead guitarist and choose these future classics as their setlist. Oasis were born.
In January 1992, the five-piece played their first gig at respected Manchester venue The Boardwalk. They rehearsed endlessly there too. “We knew the songs inside-out,” says Bonehead. “That’s where we put the legwork in, as a gang of mates.”

Oasis recorded a demo tape with Coyle at a backstreet Liverpool studio, but only pressed eight copies: they didn’t need it. In May 1993, Oasis played fourth on the bill at Glasgow club King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut to 18 Wheeler, a band signed to Creation, the lauded independent label of Primal Scream, My Bloody Valentine and Teenage Fanclub. Creation boss Alan McGee was only there early by mistake. “The first song was great, but I was drunk and drugged, so I didn’t know if it was just that,” he said. “But by the third song I was, ‘I’m doing it.’ After the show, I went up to Noel and said: ‘I’m Alan McGee, do you want a record deal?’”

Despite having such great songs, capturing the band’s ferocious energy proved a challenge. Initial sessions at Monnow Valley studio in the Welsh countryside were disappointing. Placed with Dave Batchelor, a veteran producer of ‘70s acts such as The Sensational Alex Harvey Band and The Skids, the age gap and his overly-technical methods jarred with a band only used to playing live. “We played our parts right,” says Bonehead. “But Dave wasn’t familiar with us as people or as musicians.”

They relocated to Sawmills studio in Cornwall, so remote that the band had to get a boat to the local pub. Production duties were now in the hands of Mark Coyle and the band, deciding that the obvious solution was to set the band up and play as they would in concert. “We were really relaxed and comfortable,” says Bonehead, who spent his spare time canoeing on the estuary next to the studio with Liam. “We had our friend Mark behind the desk, pressing the big red Record button.”

Within a fortnight, Definitely Maybe was recorded. Its 11 songs flowed perfectly, from the swaggering statement of intent on the opening Rock ‘N’ Roll Star to Married With Children’s closing moment of calm. The producers’ studio inexperience showed in places, which mixer Owen Morris did the perfect job of rescuing. In Coyle’s words: “Owen chopped and edited, until he brought it to life.”

Creation sent out a demo version of the snarling Columbia to industry tastemakers in December 1993. Only intended to cause a buzz among critics, they were taken aback when Radio 1 playlisted it. Here was the first affirmation that Oasis’ music just couldn’t be contained.

By the time Supersonic was released as their proper debut single in April 1994, incendiary gigs meant the public were aware that – backed by a trio of musicians in Bonehead, Guigsy and McCarroll who were, to quote Liam, “tight as fuck” – the Gallaghers were incredible musicians and riotously funny superstars. The world needed Oasis… and those 86,000 first week sales snowballed very quickly indeed.

Barely a year later, second album (What’s The Story?) Morning Glory cemented Oasis’ rise to become one of the biggest bands in the world. Once again, in addition to singles like Wonderwall and Don’t Look Back In Anger, album-only tracks such as Champagne Supernova, became timeless classics. Concerts at Knebworth in August 1996 have become the stuff of legend, all 250,000 tickets for Oasis’ two shows snapped up instantly in the days before online ticket sales.

Third album Be Here Now smashed sales records, its 650,000 first week sales still Britain’s fastest-selling album. Oasis continued to routinely sell out stadiums, headline festivals and top charts. All eight albums reached No 1 and they scored eight chart-topping singles, as songs such as Little By Little, Songbird, The Importance Of Being Idle and Lyla joined their list of calls-to-arms universal anthems.

So we can talk about sales figures, how Oasis changed the face of music and how their songs continue to influence generations of new musicians. Or, if you want to know Oasis’ real power, we could just suggest you start by playing Definitely Maybe.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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