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Objectivity Paperback – November 5, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-1890951795 ISBN-10: 189095179X

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 501 pages
  • Publisher: Zone Books (November 5, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 189095179X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1890951795
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #73,288 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This richly illustrated book deeply renews the meaning of accurate reproduction by showing how many ways there have been to be 'true to nature.' Art, science, and reproduction techniques are merged to show that 'things in themselves' can be presented with their vast and beautiful company. This splendid book will be for many years the ultimate compendium on the joint history of objectivity and visualization." -- Bruno Latour, author of Politics of Nature: How to Bring the Sciences into Democracy

(Bruno Latour)

"This is a deeply researched book that will make you think. It is beautiful, and it is important....I recommend it to anyone -- optimist or pessimist, female or male -- with a healthy dash of curiosity and a cranium." -- Oren Harman, Bar Ilan University, Israel, The European Legacy



"As Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison point out in their capacious and engaging study of the concept of scientific objectivity from the 17th century to the present day, the universal form is key to understanding how modern science moved from the study of curiosities, through the representations of perfect, notional specimens, to a concept of objectivity as responsibility for science." Brian Dillon Modern Painters



"The author's argument here is complicated but fascinating (and, because the argument is about images, the book is beautiful)." Science



"This is a surprising, engrossing book that treats humanity's struggle to unsnarl the world and itself as a field of endless turmoil and fascination." Rain Taxi



"We need history of science in the style of Daston and Galison: a history of science that commands the details but at the same time discerns the shape of larger developmentsand that makes us realize just how many meanings have been packed into the little word 'objectivity,' which rolls so trippingly off the tongue." Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

About the Author

Lorraine Daston is Director at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, Germany. She is the coauthor of Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750 and the editor of Things That Talk: Object Lessons from Art and Science (both Zone Books).

Peter Galison is Pellegrino University Professor of the History of Science and of Physics at Harvard University. He is the author of Einstein's Clocks, Poincaré's Maps: Empires of Time, How Experiments End, and Image and Logic: A Material Culture of Microphysics, among other books, and coeditor (with Emily Thompson) of The Architecture of Science (MIT Press, 1999).

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Book Bear on May 27, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a very interesting, and entertaining, exposition on the history of what we now call scientific objectivity. It explores the definitions of the objective, subjective, and their pre-kantian and post-kantian meanings in the context of the evolution of the social construction of scientific objectivity. These few words cannot do this great book proper justice but there are very few books, that when I finish, I immediately begin to read again. This was one of them.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book should be required reading for university students, the world over. Many students are so entrenched in ideology, the objectivity of their own carefully constructed reality is rarely questioned. This reading will certainly give you a some guidelines to arrive at an objective "truth."
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27 of 46 people found the following review helpful By W. P. Vogt on September 1, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the best book I have read in a decade. It is breathtaking in its scope and its depth of detail. Seeing objectivity as it is depicted in scientific atlases provides a new image of objectivity and a new understanding of the history of its evolution.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Edward G. Rozycki on March 2, 2014
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A fascinating, enlightening book. Made me realize how ideologically slanted by epistemological education was. A book to be taken seriously by philosophers and educators both science and the arts. (Occasionally, however, a conclusion is drawn from a weak premise -- this is mostly, but not always, a minor error.) I am rereading and closely analyzing the book to use it support my own future publications. It's a good read, a great historical study and an important source of insight.
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16 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Mark Estes on June 2, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Four versions of "seeing" scientifically are succinctly summarized (pp. 412-413):
18th century (classical) "four-eyed" sight -- truth-to-nature depiction;
19th century "blind" sight of mechanical objectivity;
20th century "physiognomic" sight of "trained" judgment;
where the first three give way to "haptic" sight by means of image-as-tool, inseparable from the scientific-self, made visible to the acolyte:
--subject to simulated manipulations
--machine-generated virtual artifact, expertly extracted from an artificial reality -- a model
--altered in aspect, hue, or scale to make it artistically pleasing
--no longer held to be a copy
--the True and Beautiful necessarily converging for the sake of presentation -- not representation
--deliberately enhanced to clarify, persuade, and/or please.

Daston is the new Mary Hesse.
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