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Observations Upon The Prophecies Of Daniel And The Apocalypse Of St. John Paperback – November 7, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 7, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1440442959
  • ISBN-13: 978-1440442957
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.3 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,098,101 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

English physicist, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher.

Customer Reviews

Very interesting reading.
Blaine Benson
He had a very keen insight to apocalyptic events as written in the book of Daniel.
marsha van
This book gives you a great viewpoint from Newton on Christian Eschatology.
Malisimo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 77 people found the following review helpful By J.L. Haynes on September 21, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The mastermind of Sir Isaac Newton yields results just as brilliant when studying Bible prophecy as when he turned his attention to the physical universe! There is in this book a consistency of interpretation in all the details of the prophecies of Daniel and of Revelation that I have not seen in any of the works of modern-day scholars. Isaac Newton seems to be completely true to the message of the Bible when providing his own thoughts on the Antichrist, the Beast, the Woman called "Babylon", and the "Great Tribulation". The integrity of Newton's scholarship and skills of exegesis give the reader a distinct impression that, unlike most writers on end-times prophecy today, when faced with a detail of interpretation that conflicted with his existing views, Newton would have gladly given up his prejudices in exchange for something better: the Truth. He presents an excellent example--perhaps the best I have read--of what is known as Premillennial Historicism. This is essentially the same view held by H. Grattan Guinness, E.B. Elliott, Matthew Henry, and Charles Spurgeon. In my opinion every pastor or teacher who preaches or teaches on the subject of the Last Things should have a copy of "Observations..." on his or her desk.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Steel Gator on February 8, 2009
Format: Paperback
Isaac Newton's interpretation of the prophecies of Daniel and John's Revelation of Jesus Christ was a great surprise. He loaded his points with historic reference rather than 'This is what I feel is true' views that we read and hear so often today. Although I was impressed with his historic views of these prophecies, I was most impressed with his Christian faith. To think one of the greatest scientists of all time was a strong believer in Christ is simply awesome!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Malisimo on October 15, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book gives you a great viewpoint from Newton on Christian Eschatology. However Newton is not easy reading and might require some prior knowledge of biblical prophesy. I would love to see any writings Newton did on the book of Ezekiel.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J.L. Populist on December 21, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While some of Newton's theories regarding Daniel and Revelation were very good, the inclusion of Latin text was a major disappointment for me!
If you are a layperson like myself,the Latin serves no purpose.Now if a reader can read Latin, that may be a plus for them.

There were however, some highlights in the book that I gleaned.

Mr. Newton connects the four living creatures(in Newton's day they were referred to as "beasts")of Ezekiel and Revelation to the 12 tribes of Israel. He recognizes the faces of the creatures as symbols employed by the tribes in their encampment standards.Judah- a Lion, Ephraim- a Bull or ox, Dan- an Eagle, Reuben- a Man. On page 132 he wrote,"Whence were framed the heiroglyphicks of cherubims and seraphims to represent the people of Israel."

He defines the differences between cherubim and seraphim.

The author also provides a thoughtful argument against Antiochus Epiphanes being the horn in Daniel.

Like Uriah Smith and others, he identifies the little book in Revelation as the sealed book from Daniel.

For any reader looking to study a historicist view of Daniel and the Revelation of John, I would recommend "The Prophecies of Daniel and the Revelation" by Uriah Smith as a much better choice.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Brian Gueringer on June 25, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was very excited when I found out Isaac Newton was a Unitarian like myself. So I got the two books that he had written about the bible and it's meaning. I think there is another one but I am not sure. The first one concerning two errors in the bible and this one. The first one was a private a letter that turned up in the 40's. They have been published now and shed light on one of the most intelligent men in history.
This book goes with his wanting to know when the end would come. Which oddly enough is around 2060. The way he walks through the prophercies of Daniel and Revealtion is something to behold. He does take some shots at the Trinity but overall it is more of a history book of things that have been fulfilled. To see this mans mind at work is something to behold indeed.
A lot of people don't know he was going to become a minister. After years of study he walked away from taking the title because of the Trinity belief. He could not voice his opinion for fear that he would be killed. He hid them and they were found much later and sold at an auction. This is a great read not matter what you believe. If you are like me it adds to what you already believe. If you are a Trinitarain it is still a great study on the prophecy of the bible and who knows it might make you consider the Trinity in a different light and make you study the subject for yourself!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bruce B on December 7, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a fascinating trip through the most brilliant (human) mind, in my opinion, in history. Although his conclusions about which countries were represented by the different symbols in Daniel and Revelation — due to his position in our timeline — his amazingly studious research was as thorough as it could have possibly been. His proximity in time to the literature he references makes for a very interesting perspective. I did, however, skip almost all of the latin and old/middle french he writes in (at length) so I managed to read through the book in a couple of days. This is as much a study of Newton's quirky - Shakespearian writing style as it is of Daniel and Revelation.
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