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Ocean of Pearls


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Editorial Reviews

Amrit Singh is of two worlds, but belongs to neither. A turban-wearing Sikh, he has lived his life in North America out of sorts and out of place, cast adrift at an uneasy crossroads between East and West. But when he is offered a prestigious position as a transplant surgeon in a Detroit hospital, the young doctor sees it as an opportunity to start fresh. He struggles to be the man he believes he is and at the same time the person he wants to be. His ambitious pursuit of success, however, eventually leads to tragedy and it is only in defining his singular identity that he finds peace.

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Product Details

  • Actors: Omid Abtahi, Heather McComb, Ron Canada, Frank Zieger, Navi Rawat
  • Directors: Sarab Neelam
  • Writers: Sarab Neelam, V. Prasad
  • Producers: Jim Burnstein, Jaspal Neelam
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Asian Crush
  • DVD Release Date: November 13, 2012
  • Run Time: 97 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00A705CII
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #169,213 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Good acting and sets.
Nat Kat
The film interweaves some very serious issues in medical research and clinical practice with the challenges of maintaining ethnic identity in North America.
PJR
It spoke to me even though I am not Sikh.
Ruffie Tealet

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ruffie Tealet on February 6, 2012
Format: DVD
Ocean of Pearls has been a very insightful experience into the world of Sikh religion. Coming from Malaysia, a country where there are an estimated number of 130,000 Sikhs, I was aware that Sikhism was a separate religion from Hinduism, Buddhism and Islamism. Though equipped with that knowledge, I was surprised to find that I had learnt such a significant amount on the Sikh culture.
I found two conflicts within the movie especially thought provoking. One being the struggle to oppose the forces of racism in the modern world derived from the misunderstanding of Sikhism, and the other being his internal psychological battle between compromising the traditional Sikh practices in attempt to gain the image of being "normal" in society.

I watched this at a Cranbrook showing during my Senior year today. IT was a very very powerful film. It spoke to me even though I am not Sikh. This film needs to be sold SO I CAN BUY IT NOW.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By PJR on January 24, 2013
Format: DVD
The description of the film on Amazon might make it seem a bit trite. It is not of the very highest quality as a "film" -- no citizen Kane here. And it might be seen as just another "struggle to maintain one's integrity" film. But that would be selling it quite short.

The film interweaves some very serious issues in medical research and clinical practice with the challenges of maintaining ethnic identity in North America. First let me say that almost nothing is said about Sikh religious beliefs, but the emphasis is on how important community and tradition are to them and the turban becomes a symbol of that in the film. The doctor's struggle to keep or abandon his turban in order to advance his dreams of medical progress is mixed beautifully with his struggle to advance his dreams of medical progress and save lives in the face of the business model for medical research and clinical treatment. Religious beliefs come in because it is part of his Sikh belief to give and do good and serve others. That is why he became a doctor.

He was lured to move from Toronto to Detroit to begin an organ transplant center based on his own research. In the US the business model dominates in medicine, however, whereas in Toronto there is virtually universal coverage and he would have been able to do everything to save a patient. Not so in Detroit for a patient that does not have adequate insurance and it is tearing out his heart. At the same time, he is being passed over for leadership because he does not look as good with his turban and dark features as another doctor when it comes to fund raising. How much should he compromise his integrity in the new system in the US? Abuse adds to abuse. And he has isolated himself from his support community of Sikhs back in Toronto.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on November 12, 2011
Format: DVD
This movie highlights the struggle one Sikh man deals with balancing his spiritual identity with his work goals. It is informative, engaging, and manages to avoid potentially cheesy pitfalls in addressing the issues faced by the character. I highly recommend it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nat Kat on March 8, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video
Ocean of Pearls is about Indians in Canada and USA. Interesting glimpse into the culture and religion of sikhism. Also touches upon how the main character's moral code is affected by the corruption of corporate for-profit medicine. Good acting and sets. Very different from Indian "Bollywood" type film. A bit predictable, but worth watching for good story line and character development.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Trancelucence on August 26, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Simple, quiet film full of important issues, e.g., choices we make in life, being true to oneself, not compromising one's principles, etc. Also examines ethical issues in healthcare, e.g., the best care going to those with the most money, patients being viewed as means to a profitable end, etc. It plays like an after-school special, a made-for-TV movie (albeit a fairly good one). As others have said, it's predictable, formulaic, nothing earth-shattering but if the subject matter is of interest to you, you may like it.

Sikhs are from India, slightly reminiscent of Quakers, emphasize selflessness and live their lives in service to others (ALL people) and are a unique, intriguing people. Their religion is like no other, they accept other faiths as equally valid, live amongst others, and don't proselytize (seek to convert anyone), though everyone is welcome to attend their devotional services. They're one of the few faiths that accords equal status to women (have done for centuries). Sikh men never cut their hair (for women that's optional), and wear turbans in public, and as depicted in the film, are often mistaken for Arabs and suffer post 9/11 discrimination. Both men and women are chaste until marriage.

***MILD SPOILER*** This is a simplistic but heartfelt, well-meaning tale about a brilliant physician and organ transplant researcher who is tempted to violate the tenets of his faith in order to achieve professional goals, further his career and advance medical science. Chock-full of thorny ethical, moral, medical, religious and cultural issues, e.g., prejudice and tolerance, all presented simply and clearly (yet not in a preachy, overbearing way). It covers a LOT of ground, but quite subtly so.
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