Engineering & Transportation
Ocean's End Travels Through Endangered Seas and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$12.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by sunbeamtn
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: With the exception of a small tear on the dustjacket (taped), this book is in like new condition with clean pages, great dustjacket and cover.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ocean's End Travels Through Endangered Seas Hardcover – March 23, 2000


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$6.32 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle Business Book Daily Deal
Today only, Thomas J. Stanley's "The Millionaire Next Door" is on sale for only $2.99. Shop now

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books (March 23, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465015700
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465015702
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,091,457 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Take a pristine coral reef off the mangrove-forested coast of Belize, one that draws a handsome roster of fish and other sea creatures--and, therefore, a complement of scuba divers, sports fishermen, photographers, and other consumers of nature. Add an airstrip to serve these cash customers, then a hotel, then a seawall, then a golf course, then a desalination plant. In no time, thanks to the changes you've wrought on the coastal ecology, you'll have a dead reef in a dead patch of sea.

Such wanton destruction is the norm for today, writes science journalist Colin Woodard, who debarks from his travels on the world's seas with depressing and unremittingly bad news. One of the victims is the Black Sea of Eurasia, once a thriving extension of the Atlantic, now all but destroyed by "overfishing, oil spills, industrial discharges, nutrient pollution, wetlands destruction," and other ills. The ravaged Black Sea is mirrored in other places to which Woodard travels: the South Pacific, the Gulf of Mexico, the Antarctic. In such places significant ecological transformations are occurring, all in a very short period of time, all perhaps irreversible, all certainly dangerous to the health of the biosphere. "The oceans," Woodard urges his readers to consider, "are finite and destructible. Wastes dumped and drained into the ocean do not disappear; they are neither economic nor ecological externalities. Likewise, marine fish and animals are not commodities like iron, wheat, or broilers; they are wildlife." Adding to works such as Carl Safina's Song for the Blue Ocean, Woodard makes a clear and urgent call for the reversal of all this destruction and for the protection of the world's waters. --Gregory McNamee

From Publishers Weekly

Drawing on his travels across six continents and 100,000 miles, Woodard skillfully supports his argument that pollution, harmful fishing practices, ignorance and global warming are destroying the world's oceans. A global affairs writer for the Christian Science Monitor, he swam through algae and human sewage in the Dead Sea, dived among both pristine and bleached coral reefs in the Caribbean waters around Belize and braved the glaciated coasts of Antarctica to see the melting polar ice sheets. With vivid, detailed descriptions, he successfully brings to life the fascinating mysteries of marine science. Most engaging and poignant are Woodard's myriad interviews with people living alongside troubled oceans. From Newfoundland fishermen, out-of-work since the Grand Banks' massive cod stocks were exhausted, to beleaguered residents of the Pacific Ocean's Marshall Islands, who battle fast-encroaching waters and continued contamination from American nuclear weapons testing, he uncovers a colorful cast of scientists, officials, activists, divers and religious missionaries who attest to the human and economic costs of ecological decline. Woodard also outlines strategies that, he contends, must be taken to save our seas. Although his approach is somewhat one-sided, it is a sobering call to action for those interested in the plight of the world's oceans. (Apr.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Colin Woodard, an award-winning author and journalist, is State & National Affairs Writer for The Portland Press Herald and Maine Sunday Telegram, and a longtime correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor and The Chronicle of Higher Education. His work has appeared in The Economist, The Washington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, Smithsonian, Newsweek/The Daily Beast, Bloomberg View, Washington Monthly and dozens of other national and international publications. A native of Maine, he has reported from more than fifty foreign countries and six continents, and lived for more than four years in Eastern Europe during and after the collapse of communism. His investigative reporting for the Telegram won a 2012 George Polk Award.

His most recent book, "American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America", was named a Best Book of 2011 by the editors of The New Republic and the Globalist and won the 2012 Maine Literary Award for Non-Fiction. "The Republic of Pirates", a definitive biography of Blackbeard, Sam Bellamy, and other members of the most famous pirate gang in history, is the basis of the forthcoming NBC drama "Crossbones", starring John Malkovich.

He is also the author of the New England bestseller "The Lobster Coast", a cultural and environmental history of coastal Maine; "Ocean's End: Travels Through Endangered Seas", a narrative non-fiction account of the deterioration of the world's oceans.

A graduate of Tufts University and the University of Chicago, he lives in Midcoast Maine.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
18
4 star
4
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 23 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Woodard takes us on a world tour of the crisis facing the oceans. From the Antarctic ice sheet to the Cancer alley of the lower Mississippi, Woodard travelled the globe, interviewing policy makers, scientists, and ordinary people affected by the environmental changes.
The style is both readable and rigorous. Woodard takes great pains to make clear what is known and what is not, and while clearly reaching "green" conclusions, he is careful to examine different perspectives. Woodard is a master storyteller. The people he comes across in his travels come to life as each chapter unwinds another environmental and economic tragedy in progress.
This is a very human book. Woodard doesn't wallow in the "fish-kissers" moral approach to environmentalism (what did that shrimp do to you?). Nor does he delve too deeply into the minutia of the science affecting a particular ecosystem (Do mollusks have brains?) Instead, he makes a compelling case for how the ongoing degradation affects both the local people who rely on a part of the oceans directly and human life as a whole.
I highly recommend this book to all concerned world citizens. We are past worrying about what is the "right" thing to do with respect to the oceans. We need to be concerned about what can be done to prevent a major disruption in the world's economic, climate, and food supply systems.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Steffen Schmidt, Ph.D. on November 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
Ocean's End is one of the most compelling examples of how bad Coastal Zone policy has destroyed vast areas of ocean and shore. It is not too strong a point that human beings in recent history have behaved themselves very, very badly as they looted the seas and dumped their waste and industrial toxins down river or directly into the sea. I am using this book in my International Integrated Coastal Zone Management class as the first assigned textbook. (...)
Why? Because I want my graduate students to first see how wonderful the world's oceans and coastal zones are and secondly, how incredibly stupid and short sighted we can be as we mismanage our responsibilities as stewards of these ecosystems. Colin Woodward has done a wonderful job of narrating a gripping, exciting, and enfuriating story from the killing of the Black Sea to the plundering of the Newfoundland Grand Banks and all of the other case studies in between.
This is a book worth reading and also one that is compellingly interesting and enjoyable. Take it on your next trip or read it and then take my web-based graduate class in International Coastal Management. You'll be ahead of yourself!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
Each chapter in this book tells a story illustrating a different crisis, and each gives something new to be outraged over. The stories are well-written, and Ocean's End gives the best summary of global warming that I have read. It is easy to understand (making the reader feel almost intelligent). I would recommend this to everyone, and wish there was a way to get this into high school curricula.
My only complaint is the summary. Woodard draws the reader's passions out, but doesn't suggest explicit ways to get involved in the issues. I ended up writing letters to my congressional representatives.
Read this book, and start your own letter campaign.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 12, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Balanced and written smartly, this book is impressive for its depth and scope of coverage. Moreover, Woodard's style of allowing the facts and science to speak above the opinions and guesses (which perhaps out number the former) is compelling. Excellence from a first-time author.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By susan m. o'keeffe on July 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Excellent research, good writing and exceptionally important issues. Anyone who would like to learn more about the oceans, how they function and how we are destroying this life source, should read this book. The author also expertly describes the intimate ties between climate change and the oceans.
The publisher's are missing an opportunity by not supporting this work more; they are also not fulfilling their responsibility to the present and future generations of all living (and endangered) beasts.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I loved the book. It amazes me why the publisher didn't do more to get it out there. The lack of attention for these important titles is a crime. Great work Colin
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Colin Woodard is a very finr reporter. He does what we hope a fine reporter will do, takes us to places we cannot visit ourselves and makes us understand those places, and to see ourselves more clearly. I suppose that it is not entirely surprising that some of the finest reporting being done today is on what is certainly the most important issue now facing the planet: the degradation of our environment. My other favorite of the spring crop of books is Diana Muir's surprisingly delightful Bullough's Pond, Economy and Ecosystem. Read Woodard, the book is a pleasure and you will learn a thing or two along the way. What more could you ask for?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Brian D. Rubendall HALL OF FAME on April 26, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Woodard's book does for the oceans what Mark Herstgaard's "Earth Odessy" did for the rest of the planet. It sounds the alarm of environment degredation. Lie Herstgaard, Woodard does not just sit around and speculate, he travelled to the world's environmental trouble spots and reports what he saw. Particularly chilling is his description of the "death" of the Black Sea and how a similar fate might befall the Gulf of Mexico. Like Herstgaard, Woodard offers solutions for the environmental crises he describes, however unlikely that they might ever be enacted by world governments. For the most part, this is quite a compelling book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search