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Odd Man Out [VHS]


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Product Details

  • Actors: James Mason, Robert Newton, Kathleen Ryan, Cyril Cusack, Carol Reed
  • Format: NTSC
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Paramount Home Video
  • VHS Release Date: April 20, 1988
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6300988856
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #438,826 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 34 customer reviews
Taken simply as a thriller, the film can seem a tad overlong.
ronzo
The group is able to pull Mason back into their car, but as it negotiates a rapid turn at a nearby corner he falls out.
William Hare
The film focuses on the love of a young woman for him and her attempt to rescue him.
William Linsley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Thomas R. Dean on April 9, 1999
Format: DVD
This is the greatest film I've ever seen. No one I know (of the dozens I've urged to see it) has ever disliked it, and it has become for others, their favorite movie too. It is really a story of all people: in their struggles on earth, their increasingly less purposeful attempts to survive, their deaths, the things they love, their religious faith transcending their deaths. It is also the story of the varied reactions of people toward one such person, a wounded, dying I.R.A. gunman on the run on the streets of Belfast or Londonderry in the late 1940s. The cinematography, the breadth of social classes (and ages) shown, the symbols, the suspense, the tenderness and callousness, are fascinating. The religious insights of the gunman, and of the grandmother of the girl who has a crush on him (and goes out into the Irish alleys to search for him) and of the police chief searching for him, are extraordinarily deep for a movie that is also edge-of-seat suspense. I've read that this is James Mason's favorite among the movies he did. The director Carol Reed's better known movie, "The Third Man" with Orson Welles, was not quite as broad or as deep as this. I note that every single person reviewing this movie has given it the highest rating this system allows; (how many other movies are AVERAGING 5 stars?) I would submit that it is the greatest movie ever made.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By William Hare on March 16, 2002
Format: DVD
Belfast is a city of two faces. One city consists of bustling streets and energetic people with ready smiles. The other was that presented in this gripping film, that which the world media has focused on with increasing attention with the passage of time, the city of conflict where tensions accelerate to the boiling point and explode into violence.
"Odd Man Out" is a 1947 release which represents Carol Reed's first of three successively acclaimed international masterpieces. It was followed by "The Fallen Idol" with Ralph Richardson and Michelle Morgan and "The Third Man" with Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli and the moving appearance in the last thirty minutes by Orson Welles. James Mason was also greatly assisted career-wise in his sensitive role as a young Nationalist underground leader living the last day of his life in a state of excruciating pain. Mason had earlier come to prominence in the 1945 release "The Seventh Veil" with Ann Todd. This role completed his momentum swing into the top ranks of international cinema stardom.
"Odd Man Out" and "The Third Man" have been selected as representative of British film noir at its finest. Reed uses shadows to compelling effect, while Robert Krasker, who would win an Oscar for Cinematography in "The Third Man," handled the camera with equally consummate skill in "Odd Man Out." The Reed-Krasker team present compelling silhouettes of characters who cross the path of Mason, whose face reveals the requisite painful sensitivity as underground gang leader Johnny McQueen.
The film begins with the clock in the main square striking noon and ends at the ring of midnight.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A. C. Walter on October 6, 2003
Format: DVD
ODD MAN OUT portrays life in an unnamed city in Northern Ireland via the unlikely narrative structure of the episodic fantasy--that is, in the tradition of ALICE IN WONDERLAND and THE WIZARD OF OZ; it is quite possible, in fact, that it influenced the Jim Jarmusch film DEAD MAN. James Mason plays Johnny McQueen, an Irish freedom fighter who is seriously wounded early in the film. As he wanders about the city in delirium, Johnny becomes a sort of talisman sought after by several eccentric characters for their own purposes, and he is reduced (or is it, elevated?) to the status of fatalistic symbol. The film presents us with an unlikely, outrageous, and irresistible portrait of an Ulster community, filmed by Carol Reed with delicious visual style. Every frame bursts with some brilliant image--the contrast of light and shadow, stunning camera angles, ingenious special effects, and snow in the night. In my opinion, the film rates slightly above Reeds THE THIRD MAN and slightly below his underappreciated THE FALLEN IDOL.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Bomojaz on November 14, 2005
Format: DVD
Magnificent in just about every way. James Mason plays an Irish rebel in Dublin who attempts to rob a factory to finance his cause, but gets shot in the process. For 12 hours (noon to midnight) he wanders the city, a very wanted man, bleeding to death, seeking the help he desperately needs but never gets.

Everyone he encounters either refuses to help out of fear, or will help but only for their own personal gains. This roll call of ignominy includes an egotistical painter who is only interested in capturing his death on canvas, a priest who is only interested in saving his soul before he dies, a man who will sell him out to the highest bidder, and even the woman who loves him who chooses to die with him than live a life alone.

Mason's big scene where he chastises his fellow man for lack of charity borders on the melodramatic (the camera angle makes him appear like Christ on the cross), but it's a powerful indictment all the same. James Agee doubted that a city at night had ever been better photographed, and he's probably right. It's a powerful, moving film, and one not likely to be forgotten once seen.
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