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4.3 out of 5 stars
The Odyssey of Homer
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32 of 42 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
I recognize and agree that Lattimore's translations of "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey" are the MOST TRUE to Homer and Ancient Greek we have ever seen.

Two minor examples: he uses long verse lines (like Homer), maintains Homer's sentence structure and he keeps and repeats all the Epitaphs exactly as they appear in Homer.

Lattimore's choice of words and sentence organization can sometimes seem jumbled and complicated and his manner/style somewhat archaic, it is because Lattimore is showing how Homer "sounds" in English as if you were translating it directly and perfectly from the Greek. That is Lattimore's aim, to render Homer as EXACTLY as possible. For this I am grateful...he has helped many to develop a more scholarly aptitude.

This aside,

I give it 3 stars because I find that his translation is not condusive to reading. Lattimore's 1960's American English is out of date and the story moves excessively slow. I often find Lattimore's Homer stodgy, hard, complicated, and often boring!

My favorites are still Stanley Lombardo's (Prosaic Verse) and E.V. Rieu's (Novel-like Prose) versions. Both full of fire-like Excitement, shimmering Beauty and monumental Drama.

I always recommend having 2 or 3 different versions of Homer on shelf, Lattimore is always on mine...not for reading enjoyment though but only for comparing.

Thanks
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on May 9, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I really don't know if this is any better than the free public domain versions available. Classics can be a chore to read and I have to admit I found the introductory explanation of the poem fairly boring.
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on February 13, 2013
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This translation works just fine and is easy to read. My professor found some of translations different from his book, but very much on point.
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7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on April 28, 2005
Format: Paperback
Although Mandelbaum's translation of the Divine Comedy is well-done and highly recommended, I don't think too much of his translation of the Odyssey: it reads stiffly and is very dense going.

If you're gonna read it, I would recommend the Lattimore translation (0060931957), which reads much more clearly and naturally.

This ain't just me: look at the difference in the Amazon reviews.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 15, 2014
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
May have made the mistake of reading this before reading the Iliad. Good read nonetheless.
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4 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on May 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
Have you ever imagined yourself traveling the world and discovering new lands and inhabitants that no one knew existed? Homer uses this idea in his classic epic, The Odyssey, to capture the attention of his readers as they are taken on the adventures of the main hero Odysseus. The epic functions on two levels, one following the hero on his journey and the other showing the trials that Odysseus' family must face in his absence. During the time period Homer existed, the idea of a hero greatly appealed to the general public. Even today, the idea of battling a Cyclops or defeating suitors in an archery contest captivates audiences to the point where they do not want to stop reading. In the end, Odysseus returns to his homeland, Ithaca, after enduring a great number of challenges. We are able to share in the emotions of the hero at this moment and share in his joy of conquering the tests he encountered. This is what makes The Odyssey a truly great epic that will stand the test of time.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on March 17, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
THIS TAKES A WHILE TO GET TO THE REAL STORY. i DIDN'T REALIZE IT IS MORE OF A CONTRAST AND COMPAARISON.
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1 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on January 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
W.H.D. Rouse's prose translation of The Odyssey takes too many liberties, especially for a prose translation. One needs only to look at the beginning of book 1: where is the invocation to the muse? Rouse's idea of the Greek language available to Homer was that it was more varied than it was. Also, in remembering this epic, the storyteller had to use many stock phrases, as it is such a long book. Rouse does not seem to understand this.
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6 of 34 people found the following review helpful
on January 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
HI: i can't find out from Help how to edit the prior review I wrote explaining that because I found Lattimore's translations of the Gospels&Revelation inaccurate, I wondered how good His Homer could be. So, consider this the correction. The prior review was way too strongly-worded. I meant what I said, but it wasn't as soft as it should have been.
No one is perfect, and there is YET no good English translation of the New Testament, so why should Lattimore be expected to get right what NO one has ever gotten right? So, please bear this thought in mind as you see me lambast Lattimore in my other review, which has the words "ek koilia" in it (vocabulary form).
I heartily apologize for the other review's tone!
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1 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on December 31, 2002
Format: Paperback
I'll have to get the book to find out, I guess. I found several of his Gospel renderings inexcusable, suffering from the same idiocy as 1st-year seminary students (i.e., translating ek koilia as "in the womb", when it only and always means "out from the womb" as any 1st-year text can prove). I didn't see him render ANY of the Atticisms in Gospels as Atticisms, for another example. So, I'm skeptical.
Then again, with Homer he's not got the same politically-correct strictures. Will have to see...
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