Of Gods and Men 2011 PG-13 CC

Amazon Instant Video

(148) IMDb 7.2/10
Available in HD

Loosely based on the life of the Cistercian monks of Tib?hirine in Algeria, from 1993 until their kidnapping in 1996, OF GODS AND MEN tells a story of eight French Christian monks who live in harmony with their Muslim brothers.

Starring:
Lambert Wilson, Michael Lonsdale
Runtime:
2 hours, 4 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Of Gods and Men

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Xavier Beauvois
Starring Lambert Wilson, Michael Lonsdale
Supporting actors Olivier Rabourdin, Philippe Laudenbach, Jacques Herlin, Loïc Pichon, Xavier Maly, Jean-Marie Frin, Abdelhafid Metalsi, Sabrina Ouazani, Abdellah Moundy, Olivier Perrier, Farid Larbi, Adel Bencherif, Benhaïssa Ahouari, Idriss Karimi, Abdellah Chakiri, Goran Kostic, Stanislas Stanic, Arben Bajraktaraj
Studio Sony Pictures Classics
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Very good acting, very deep emotions come out in this movie.
Bob B.
Xavier Beauvois both wrote (with some assistance from scenarist Etienne Comar) and directed this film that is as much a work of art as it is a deeply moving story.
Grady Harp
This film is ultimately about a group of men who's love for God, those they serve, and for each other outweigh their fear of danger and even death.
Thomas Grasso

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

290 of 293 people found the following review helpful By Keris Nine TOP 1000 REVIEWER on February 24, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
What is refreshing about the popular and critical success of Of Gods and Men (winner the Grand Prix at Cannes 2010) is not that it is particularly experimental or challenging, but rather that it avoids going either for the populist crowd-pleasing angle or the tear-jerker that its real-life inspiration seems to demand. The film is based on a true story of a small community of Cistercian monks in Tibhirine in Algeria caught up in the country's political troubles during the 1990s. The monks regard it as their duty to bring aid and provide medicine for the local villagers who are suffering because of the local unrest and the battles between the national army and Islamic fundamentalists, but they risk incurring the wrath not only of the fundamentalists through their spreading of Christian beliefs, but also the Algerian army who believe that they may be giving aid and medicine to wounded militants.

It would be all too easy to let the divide that exists in this situation and the choice that is faced by the monks to remain simplistic - should they stay or should they go? Even though there are some reservations expressed, there is never any doubt that the monks will come to the logical Christian conclusion and stay. What is rather more impressive however is how the director refuses to allow this decision to be seen, as it would in a more conventional film, as simply an act of heroism or bravery. The situation is not exploited shamelessly for heavy-handed sentimentality as it would be in a Hollywood production, but rather it goes deeper into the qualities that lie behind courage and potential martyrdom. What the monks have to grapple with are their own doubts, their own flaws, their own fears - their very humanity.
Read more ›
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
86 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 14, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Something happens to the human heart while experiencing OF GODS AND MEN: the reminder of our responsibility to not only those we love but also to the betterment of the human condition no matter the cultural differences is overwhelming. Would that this film could be required viewing for every global citizen! We might, just might, begin to grow not only more tolerant of other people's beliefs but embrace them as fellow beings and in doing so, end the clangorous need for war.

Xavier Beauvois both wrote (with some assistance from scenarist Etienne Comar) and directed this film that is as much a work of art as it is a deeply moving story. The film was first released in France as 'Des hommes et des dieux' to high acclaim: hopefully it will have the same impact here in this country. Based on a true story, the time is in the 1990s, the place Algeria during their Civil War. A Trappist Monastery is the home of eight devout elderly monks, each performing the duties to allow them to exist off the land and serve the poverty stricken Algerian village near by. The head of the monastery is Christian (an elegant and tender Lambert Wilson), the old physician Luc (Michael Lonsdale) serves the physical needs of the impoverished Muslim villagers, and the rest of the monks tend the gardens for food, and study, and rise each morning to begin a day of prayers and masses. These gentle, wise old men are Christophe (Olivier Rabourin), Célestin (Philippe Laudenbach), Amédée (Jacques Herlin), Jean-Pierre (Loïc Pichon), Michel (Xavier Maly), and Paul (Jean-Marie Frin).
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
146 of 152 people found the following review helpful By Robert J. Crawford on February 26, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
This film is based on the true story of a group of monks during the recent civil war in Algeria. There is a beauty in their devotion to the poverty stricken local residents, whom they serve with warmth and simplicity.

As the real world intrudes on their quiet labor, they must confront some essential questions that could affect their prospects of survival. Should they accept an armed guard from a government with little legitimacy? Should they leave? Should they attempt to build a respectful relationship with the fundamentalist rebels who menacingly visit them? Can they abandon their mission? Their struggle with these questions forms the basis of the film's plot. While slow if you are used to hollywood action, it is completely believable, with every scene pregnant with psychological nuance and internal turmoil.

With subtle elegance, the climax of the film occurs when the monks come to their decision over a meal, together listening to music on a crude cassette player and weeping at their intimacy and commitment to the community. Even though I am not a believer, it brought tears to my eyes to witness the holiness and devotion of these men as they labored in obscurity and accepted their fate.

I saw this in Paris, where it was much discussed as an "event film". The Parisians took this as art that made an important statement and deserved to be viewed seriously and debated. This is an interesting contrast to the film experience elsewhere, whether you think it pretentious or not.

Warmly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again