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Of Mice and Men Hardcover – January 1, 1987

2,186 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Of Mice and Men is a thriller, a gripping tale running to novelette length that you will not set down until it is finished. It is more than that; but it is that. . . . In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story.”—The New York Times

“Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages. . . . The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom.”—Chicago Tribune

”A short tale of much power and beauty. Mr. Steinbeck has contributed a small masterpiece to the modern tough-tender school of American fiction.”—Times Literary Supplement [London]

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

John Steinbeck (1902-1968) is remembered as one of the greatest and best-loved American writers of the twentieth century. During the 1930s, his works included The Red Pony, Pastures of Heaven, Tortilla Flat, In Dubious Battle, and Of Mice and Men. The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939, earned him a Pulitzer Prize. In 1962, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 107 pages
  • Publisher: Viking Adult; First Edition edition (January 1, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670520713
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670520718
  • Product Dimensions: 20 x 20 x 20 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2,186 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,499,415 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

John Steinbeck (1902-1968), winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, achieved popular success in 1935 when he published Tortilla Flat. He went on to write more than twenty-five novels, including The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

366 of 386 people found the following review helpful By Linda Linguvic HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on November 3, 2001
Format: School & Library Binding
John Steinbeck wrote this classic gem in 1937. It's been a Broadway play and there have been several adaptations of it in movies and TV. I was generally familiar with the story but this was the first time I actually read the book. Wow! I was completely blown away! This is the story of a two lonely and alienated men who work as farm laborers, drifting from job to job in California. Lennie is gentle giant, physically strong but mentally retarded. George guides and protects Lennie but also depends on him for companionship. Together, they have a dream to someday buy a little farm where they can grow crops and raise rabbits and live happily ever after. This, of course, is not to be as the title suggests. "The best laid plans of mice and men" is a line in a poem by Robert Burns, which describes how a field mouse's world is destroyed by a plow.
Steinbeck's narrative voice is seemingly simple in his descriptions of nature of as well as the details of the bunkhouse. His characterizations of the people are magnificent. We meet the other workers, all loners, and appreciate the beauty of the unique friendship between Lennie and George. We meet Candy, the old man who is outliving his usefulness. We meet Crooks, the black stable hand, shunned by the men and therefore turning to books for companionship. We meet the cruel Curley who taunts Lennie into a fight. And we meet Curley's wife, another lonely soul who uses her femininity to get the wrong kind of attention.
There's tension in every word and I found myself holding my breath, knowing that something awful would happen, my eyes glued to the page, the world of Lennie and George deeply etched into my consciousness. I was pulled right into the story, wanting to shout warnings as I saw the inevitable consequences.
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90 of 99 people found the following review helpful By A.Trendl HungarianBookstore.com VINE VOICE on March 17, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck remains properly on the reading lists of high school students because of the regional imagery through succinct dialogue. Unlike "Grapes of Wrath," Steinbeck brings us swiftly into each moment, never letting us linger too long before walking us to the next place.

The American Dream has many variations, but always, it is about independence and the pride of being one's own man. Lennie and George want this independence more than most men, but have less than most men to get there. In their case, it isn't a white picket fence, but a farm where they can raise rabbits.

Lennie is not a bright man. He desires to care for someone and to be loved, but is unable to think past his own fear. George tries to protect him, but he too, although smarter than Lennie, is managed by his insecurity and foolishness.

The story surrounds Lennie and George's efforts to get and retain work on ranch near Soledad, and more so, toward their American Dream. The big picture is always with them, but it is the day-by-day difficulties they have with being outsiders. Their intrinsic inability to be free is sheer tragedy, as they both fail again and again to make the right decision.

It's a lonely story about two men who hope more than they can think, who are destined by their misery never to enjoy true companionship and happiness.

Few books are as thematically pure as "Of Mice and Men," which follows Man's search for self and meaning carefully. It is harsh in language and image, and the abstract ideas might be too much for younger readers to comprehend, but any intelligent teen will gain from it where John Knowles' "A Separate Peace" and J.D. Salinger's "The Catcher in the Rye" leave off.

I fully recommend "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck.

Anthony Trendl
editor, HungarianBookstore.com
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58 of 63 people found the following review helpful By S. C. on May 28, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am a tenth grade student and I recently read "Of Mice and Men" for a school project. I thought it was an excellent book. I felt that the author, John Steinbeck, did a first class job with this novel. It portrayed the relationship between George and Lennie in a way that made you become very attached to the characters. You wanted to read more to find out if they ever accomplished their goals and to see if their dreams became a reality. George and Lennie are complete opposites; George is a small, quick intelligent man, while Lennie is a man of huge dimensions but has the brain of a child. Throughout the story Lennie acts in ways that infuriate George, but George will always be there for his friend because he knows Lennie needs him to survive. Lennie can buck barley like no one else because of his pure strength, but would probably starve to death if he didn't have George to provide his daily meals. I think that has to do with why this book has been banned in the past by schools across the country. Some people may be offended by how the mentally challenged person is shown in this story. It seems as though the view being expressed is that people with mental problems can't do anything for themselves. They are also a constant threat to others because they cannot control themselves. Lennie didn't realize what he was doing was wrong until it had gone too far. These are stereotypes of mentally retarded people that some people may believe are reinforced by this novel. They are lead to believe that this book is discriminatory towards the mentally challenged. Parents whom believed this did not want their children reading this book because they did not want them to be exposed to these types of ideas. Also, Curly's wife does not fit the traditional mould.Read more ›
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