Of Mice, Men, and Microbes: Hantavirus and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $67.95
  • Save: $3.40 (5%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Of Mice, Men, and Microbes: Hantavirus Hardcover – June 28, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0123264602 ISBN-10: 012326460X Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $64.55
15 New from $29.55 28 Used from $0.01
Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$64.55
$29.55 $0.01

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 278 pages
  • Publisher: Academic Press; 1 edition (June 28, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 012326460X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0123264602
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.1 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,202,831 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From The New England Journal of Medicine

In the northern part of South Korea lies the Hantaan River, and during the Korean conflict in the 1950s, 3000 United Nations troops near the river became affected with fever and myalgias associated with renal disease and ecchymoses. The disorder was initially called Korean hemorrhagic fever and was later termed hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Local residents with outdoor exposure, especially those who farmed, were found to be at increased risk. Fortunately, with funding from the Department of Defense, the cause was shown in the 1960s to be a filterable agent, later called Hantaan virus -- the first hantavirus.

A similar but milder syndrome was later identified in Scandinavia and traced to exposure to a rodent, the bank vole. The causative agent was the Puumala virus, named for an area in southeastern Finland. Subsequently, in the 1980s, a very curious Carleton Gadjusek, using the newly developed polymerase-chain-reaction technique for gene amplification, examined meadow voles near his home in Maryland and found a similar virus, which he named Prospect Hill virus and which is not known to cause any disease in people. Both Puumala virus and Prospect Hill virus were found to be members of the hantavirus family.

What caught the attention of the world was an explosive outbreak of adult respiratory distress syndrome in 1993 that primarily affected Native Americans in a corner of New Mexico near an area called Muerto Canyon. Those affected had fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, and elevated white-cell counts, and 70 percent of persons with the disease died very rapidly. Outdoor exposure and exposure to deer mice were strong risk factors. Serum samples that were screened contained evidence of hantavirus infection, and genetic-fingerprint analysis, surprisingly, showed similarities between the infectious agent and Prospect Hill virus. Originally called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, the disorder was caused by a newly recognized hantavirus, now called Sin Nombre (meaning "without a name"). This was the first demonstration of a hantavirus that caused pulmonary and not renal signs.

In their clearly written book, Of Mice, Men, and Microbes: Hantavirus, Harper and Meyer examine the history of the identification of hantaviruses and describe the pathogenesis of the illnesses they cause and their worldwide influence. It is perhaps the ecologic relations of the viruses -- in particular, between El Nino and the unusual growth of pinon nuts, food of rodents, leading to a rodent "bloom" -- that are most interesting and provocative. Readers will finish the book realizing that no infections are new; it is only our recognition of the causes that is new. Readers will also realize that disease and epidemics follow chance encounters among men, mice, and associated microbes. Despite their focus on hantaviruses, the authors take readers on a journey to understand the origin and biology of viruses, the coevolution of viruses and their hosts, and humans' fear of new outbreaks and their eventual conquest with new knowledge.

The shortcoming of this book, which is an "easy read," is that its target audience is a general one. Internists, and certainly specialists in infectious diseases, will find it slow moving. For example, petechiae are defined as "skin hem orrhages... the markers of hemorrhagic fever"; platelets are defined as "the specialized cell fragments that control blood clotting," the numbers of which decrease during infection "as they react to the damage, trying to stem the leaks that will develop unless they can contain it." In general, the language is at a level appropriate to college students, and at times readers may wish for a fast-forward button. There are more basic details and more words used to explain them than most physicians need. In addition, although the book is accurate, it has no references and will thus not appeal to scholars.

The language and tone of the book also vary. At times the tone is lyrical: the Four Corners region of the United States "is a place where change is marked in natural rhythms rather than on any human calendar, and sometimes only the broadest cycles -- the eons, the epochs -- are visible to the casual observer"; at times it is enigmatic: "if a million monkeys with a million typewriters can write Hamlet, then a billion viruses with a billion of the random changes called mutations can write influenza, Ebola, or nothing at all"; and sometimes the language is turgid, as noted above.

Despite its shortcomings, anyone interested in hantaviruses will find that this book tells a very complete story. The host, agent, vector, geography, climate, psychology, and cultural responses of the people who are infected are all described. There is much to learn.

Reviewed by Richard Wenzel, M.D.
Copyright © 2000 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved. The New England Journal of Medicine is a registered trademark of the MMS.

Review

:"...In their clearly written book, Of Mice, Men, and Microbes: Hantavirus, Harper and Meyer examine the history of identification of hantaviruses and describe the pathogenesis of the illnesses they cause and their worldwide influence... Readers will finish the book realizing that no infections are new; it is only our recognition of the causes that is new. Readers will also realize that disease and epidemics follow chance encounters among men, mice and associated microbes. Despite their focus on hantaviruses, the authors take readers on a journey to understand the origin and biology of viruses, the coevolution of viruses and their hosts, and humans' fear of new outbreaks and their eventual conquest with new knowledge... anyone interested in hantaviruses will find that this book tells a very complete story. The host, agent, vector, geography,climate, psychology, and cultural responses of the people who are infected are all described. There is much to learn.
--Richard Wenzel, M.D., in NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE (March 2000)
"An essential book of those interested in emerging diseases."
--P.C. Radich, University of Indianapolis, in CHOICE (2000)
"The authors, one a scientist, the other a journalist, have produced an excellent read for the expert and non-expert alike."
--R.C. Spencer in JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL CHEMOTHERAPY (1999)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Barcelo on February 16, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book reviews the Hantavirus outbreak in the Four Corners region. It is written from the standpoint of a (cautious) epidemiologist. Other strains of Hantavirus are discussed. The history, vectors and environmental influences are examined. A comprehensive review of Hantavirus...
But dull. The authors writing style drags. They repeat themselves frequently, make little jokes that are too dry to carry their own weight, and use an annoying 'literary' technique of stating a premise and then adding "but that is not the way it happened". After 100 pages this wears on the reader.
Too bad! The material is unusually balanced, dispassionate and clear. A good introduction for a student considering a career in epidemiology - but hardly an enthralling night's read.
For _that_ I would recommend "Virus Hunter: Thirty Years of Battling Hot Viruses Around the World" by C. J. Peters or "The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance" by Laurie Garrett.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 25, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is very helpful and I have used it for both pleasure reading and in doing a report for school. This book gives detailed information, and a clear picture of what the Hanta Virus is all about.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search