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Of Wee Sweetie Mice and Men Hardcover – May 9, 1997


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Arcade Publishing; 1st U.S. ed edition (May 9, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1559703768
  • ISBN-13: 978-1559703765
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,285,603 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Get past the odd title and you'll find some of the wittiest mayhem in print?because Dan Starkey is back. Belfast journalist Starkey, introduced in Bateman's Divorcing Jack (LJ 11/1/95), writes a satirical column, drinks too much, and bemoans his failing marriage to Patricia, who's newly pregnant by another man. So Starkey takes off to write a book about the heavyweight title fight scheduled for St. Patrick's Day in New York between Mike Tyson and the Irish hope, Bobby (Fat Boy) McMaster. Never has a contender had more distractions: McMaster's inadvertent remark about blacks ignites the wrath of the militant Sons of Muhammad; his beloved wife, Mary, is kidnapped; Irish terrorists issue demands; and gays picket his training camp in Provincetown. With his sure touch and crisp prose, Bateman explains Irish political passions as deftly as he handles his wise-cracking protagonist, all the while overlaying violence with humor and charm. Essential for fans of Dan Starkey?may their numbers increase.?Michele Leber, Fairfax Cty. P.L., Va.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

The black humor of Divorcing Jack (1995), Bateman's previous Dan Starkey novel, also drives this over-the-top mix of crime novel, sports story, and political satire. In an updated version of The Harder They Fall, Bateman tells the story of Fat Boy McMaster, the pudgy Irish heavyweight champ whose manager swings the deal of the century: a title bout in Madison Square Garden against Mike Tyson. Boozing journalist Starkey, his marriage going south, agrees to write a book about the event but soon finds himself caught in a racial and political fiasco that encompasses the IRA, the Sons of Muhammad, Provincetown's gay community, and even a few save-the-whale environmentalists. It's all uproariously funny, as sacred cows are pummeled like so many sparring partners, but the comedy has a bitter aftertaste that gives this battering ram of a book its bite. When Starkey opts to have another drink and save his marriage, we nod approvingly. Good plan for a bad world. Bill Ott

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 21, 1998
Format: Hardcover
A wonderful sequel to Divorcing Jack, still with the same black humour, but a little bit more sentimentality thrown in.
It has you laughing, it has you crying, and you will enjoy every second of it. My favourite Bateman book by far.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 24, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Dry as a bone and with a sarcasm you'd kill for. Dan Starkey is an exceptional hero. Bumbly and ineffectual with a razor edged wit. One of the best authors to come out of Ireland in the last 20 years, Bateman can make you cry with laughter and smile with sympathy. If you enjoy dark edged humour, you must also try Christopher Brookbyre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By T. Cavasoz on August 24, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This was the first Bateman book that I was given to read by my pastor while living in Northern Ireland and I loved it so much that I reread it 3 times! Bateman is witty, punny and so very clever. His style may not be for everyone, as it takes someone who is tuned into "that type" of humour so be aware.
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Format: Hardcover
'Of Wee Sweetie...' is a light, funny look at how Americans view the Irish, and vica-versa. The story is rather simple. A kind-hearted, semi-talented Irish heavyweight fighter comes to New York to fight Mike Tyson. Dan Starkey, a less than semi-talented journalist, is brought along to document the Irish fighter's American experience. Things get interesting when the fighter's wife gets kidnapped and a black extremist group is suspected.
Colin Bateman makes good use of his humourous prose; he has great (and often crude) one-liners. He makes good fun of Americans and the Irish of all persuasions. I think only the most sensitive will be offended.
Bottom line: lightweight but very funny. Recommended.
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