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Oh, God, Where Are You? Hardcover – 1997


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 599 pages
  • Publisher: Vantage Press; 1st edition (1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0533119871
  • ISBN-13: 978-0533119875
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.5 x 1.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,261,111 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 29, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I read this book because Abie Abraham was a bunkmate of my great-uncle, Lloyd Spradlin, who survived the Bataan Death March only to die of dysentery in Cabantuan prison, an infamous hell-hole run by the Japanese. Although I never knew my Uncle Lloyd personally, I grew up listening to stories of the pain the family suffered when this wonderful, handsome young man was taken at the age of 22, in September, 1942. He enlisted when he was 18, and only had 2 months left of his tour of duty when the war broke out in the Pacific and the Bataan Peninsula was overrun by the Japanese. These men held out under insurmountable obstacles and fought a delaying action that has all but been forgotten. They felt forgotten, too, and called themselves "The Battling Bastards of Bataan -- no father, no mother, and no Uncle Sam ... and nobody gives a damn."
This book outlines in vivid, graphic language the horrors Mr. Abraham and thousands of other prisoners endured, and then goes on to describe Mr. Abraham's efforts after the war to disinter hundreds of American and Filipino soldiers and have their remains returned to their families. My uncle was one of these, and was returned to be buried in Lexington, Kentucky. He is personally mentioned several times in the book, along with many, many others. Mr. Abraham's memory is awesome, and I congratulate him on writing a first-hand story -- one that is becoming all too rare nowadays as we are losing so many of our precious World War II veterans.
I'm 44 -- and while I don't remember these events personally, we must never forget the sacrifice our American boys gave in the first horrible months of World War II in the Pacific.
If you're interested in World War II history at all -- especially the events in the Philipines -- this is a must-read book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 20, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Abie Abraham has experienced the horrors of being a Japanese prisoner during World War 11, and has written in graphic, and very understandable language, the horrors that he, and the many soldiers he was with, suffered during the Baatan March. His memory for names and events is outstanding, and I understand that this book is used in some schools for History purposes. Abie still works at the Butler VA as a volunteer, a very dedicated and personable gentleman, I'm proud to call him a friend.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gail Swartzlander on June 16, 2001
Format: Hardcover
"Oh God, Where Are You" is one of the best books I've ever read. It really shows the horrors of war and shows that Abie is truly a hero along with all of the others who died on or after the Bataan Death March. Even though I'm 17, I personally know Abie and work with him at the Butler VA Hospital. He is a great inspiration to me and many others. Rick
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 9, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I have just finished reading "Oh God Where Are You" and I highly recommend this book to anyone who doubts the horrors of war. Sgt. Abie Abraham of the U.S. 31st Infantry Division was captured when Bataan fell on April 9,1942.
He tells his story, and the story of the heroes of Battan. There is no false bravado in this book, just the story of soldiers struggling under the brutality of the Japanese to stay alive after their capture.
The American and Phillipino deaths that occurred during the march (55 miles) and in the prison camp were unnecessary, thousands of American soldiers were murdered by their captors, and thousands more died due to disease, lack of food and no medical supplies. After the war Abie stayed on in the Phillipines at the request of General McArthur. His efforts resulted in the recovery of hundreds of bodies of soldiers who died during the march and in captivity. Throughout his captivity Abie kept notes with names and addresses of the men he knew and met during his three years of captivity. This book is a wealth of information for anyone wanting to learn about the Bataan Death March.
Note: Abie Abraham volunteers as the POW coordinator at the V.A. Medical Center in Butler PA. My father knows him well, and Abie continues to be an inspiration to everyone at the hospital.
Walter
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 11, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I began reading this book because it contains mention of my great-uncle (Pvt. Neal Wood, Twenty-seventh Bomb Squad), and found it to be so riveting that I would read and read until the pages were getting blurry. While the writing style is a bit repetitive and at times tedious, the subject definitely keeps attention. Uncle Neal survived the Bataan Death March and the infamous Camp O'Donnell only to die of dysentery and starvation at Cabantuan. Abie Abraham and others that were fortunate to survive spent three years in the prison camps under the abusive rule of the Japanese.
Don't be daunted by the length of this book; I usually would take quite some time to read a book of this length, but I finished this one very quickly.
Mr. Abraham also has his own website (ghostofbataan.com) for anyone who is interested. From there, you can email him or explore various features like the message board.
Too often, people forget about our heroes in the Pacific during WWII because of the focus on the heroes in the European theater; let us not forget the many men who served in the military to protect our country in the Philippines. I think every high schooler should read this book so that the leaders of the future will understand how hellish war really is, not just a surgically sterile type of operation.
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