Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Old Patchwork Quilts: And the Women Who Made Them Paperback – October 1, 1992


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$14.95
Paperback
"Please retry"
$54.40 $19.91
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Howell Press Inc.; 3rd edition (October 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0939009684
  • ISBN-13: 978-0939009688
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #983,412 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 75 people found the following review helpful By Pam Olsen on April 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
I bought this book about 20 years ago. It was first published in 1929, but it reads as if it were written at the height of the feminist movement in the 70s! The author had a great sense of humor and a marvelous appreciation of how women needed, and found in quilting, an artistic/creative outlet, at a time when just about everything else in their world was controlled or created by men.
She traces the development of techniques and designs, from simple to complex, interweaving her discussion with descriptions of the social and environmental circumstances that influenced design and especially the naming of designs. For example, "It was impossible for the women who every morning viewed nature's most glorious spectacle not to create a 'Rising Sun' quilt pattern. How they loved the sunrise is best proved by the remarkable beauty of the pattern it inspired...It is a triumph of design and is so difficult of execution that only the most expert quilt-makers attempted it. A 'Rising Sun' was post-graduate work, and consequently is one of the rarest and most valuable of quilts."
She traces how pattern names often changed as the quilters' circumstances changed. For example, a pattern that has been known as the "Bear's Paw" (and sometimes as "Hand of Friendship") since the early 1800s in PA and Ohio was called "Duck's-foot-in-the-mud" in Long Island!
Describing Pennsylvania Dutch quilts within the context of the drabness of the Pennsylvania Dutch woman's existence she says, "...it may have been some unconsciously craved compensation for the drab monotony of their days that caused the women of these households to evolve quilt patterns so intricate.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Pam Olsen on April 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
I bought this book about 20 years ago. It was first published in 1929, but it reads as if it were written at the height of the feminist movement in the 70s! The author had a great sense of humor and a marvelous appreciation of how women needed, and found in quilting, an artistic/creative outlet, at a time when just about everything else in their world was controlled or created by men.
She traces the development of techniques and designs, from simple to complex, interweaving her discussion with descriptions of the social and environmental circumstances that influenced design and especially the naming of designs. For example, "It was impossible for the women who every morning viewed nature's most glorious spectacle not to create a 'Rising Sun' quilt pattern. How they loved the sunrise is best proved by the remarkable beauty of the pattern it inspired...It is a triumph of design and is so difficult of execution that only the most expert quilt-makers attempted it. A 'Rising Sun' was post-graduate work, and consequently is one of the rarest and most valuable of quilts."
Describing Pennsylvania Dutch quilts within the context of the drabness of the Pennsylvania Dutch woman's existence she says, "...it may have been some unconsciously craved compensation for the drab monotony of their days that caused the women of these households to evolve quilt patterns so intricate. Only a soul in desperate need of nervous outlet could have conceived and executed, for instance, the "Full Blown Tulip"...It is a perfect accomplishment from a needlework standpoint, yet hideous" (she describes it in detail and goes on): "This green-red-lemon-orange combination is enough to set a blind man's teeth on edge...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Pam Olsen on April 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
I bought this book about 20 years ago. It was first published in 1929, but it reads as if it were written at the height of the feminist movement in the 70s! The author had a great sense of humor and a marvelous appreciation of how women needed, and found in quilting, an artistic/creative outlet, at a time when just about everything else in their world was controlled or created by men.
She traces the development of techniques and designs, from simple to complex, interweaving her discussion with descriptions of the social and environmental circumstances that influenced design and especially the naming of designs. For example, "It was impossible for the women who every morning viewed nature's most glorious spectacle not to create a 'Rising Sun' quilt pattern. How they loved the sunrise is best proved by the remarkable beauty of the pattern it inspired...It is a triumph of design and is so difficult of execution that only the most expert quilt-makers attempted it. A 'Rising Sun' was post-graduate work, and consequently is one of the rarest and most valuable of quilts."
She traces how pattern names often changed as the quilters' circumstances changed. For example, a pattern that has been known as the "Bear's Paw" (and sometimes as "Hand of Friendship") since the early 1800s in PA and Ohio was called "Duck's-foot-in-the-mud" in Long Island!
Describing Pennsylvania Dutch quilts within the context of the drabness of the Pennsylvania Dutch woman's existence she says, "...it may have been some unconsciously craved compensation for the drab monotony of their days that caused the women of these households to evolve quilt patterns so intricate.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?