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40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not just another relativity slam., April 30, 2007
By 
This review is from: Old Physics for New: a worldview alternative to Einstein's relativity theory (Paperback)
Phipps has the good fortune to actually have been a practicing Phd physicist. Having been forced into the mold of lock step physics, he has, upon retirement, let loose pent up frustrations that must have festered over time.

Fortunately for us, he is a master at the use of the language and this artifice allows a rather uncharacteristic eloquence to his verbage that would attract any reader in search of english written in a form that is all but dormant. The book would be a pleasurable read from this point alone were it not for the pressing need to have things put aright by the author in the areas of physics not so deeply trodden in our modern age.

Phipps doesn't attack relativity directly, as so many do in a rabid fashion of late, but does us the honor of showing how much of its "bed rock", Maxwellian electrodynamics, was allowed to lead physics off track. This bed rock did not get fully corrected by the time Einstein did his work. Phipps gives us a much needed history lesson which is so often overlooked in modern science. He shows errors in many works, and later attempted corrections that ultimately went begging or that complicated, needlessly, issues that might have been handled in a wiser, more direct fashion.

He does not let words alone speak for physics, but involves us in the mathematics to a level that only those deeply involved might follow to full advantge. Yet as an electrical engineer, I perservered and gained real insights to work that normally is left to higher level physicists.

Phipps takes a delightful relish in pointing out issues that are just not right on the path to modern accepted relativistic physics. The reader will love his powerful use of the language in finger pointing and following up on faux pas on the part of his fellow physicists.

The book is a must read for those willing to think a bit deeper and allow a physicist to reveal that the veil of physics is a bit tattered and shop worn and, to its detriment,loaded with all manner of operable but poorly conceived patchwork attempts.

A real eye opener, regardless of your thoughts on the matter in the end.

Intellectually stimulating, eloquent, humorous in places, and very thought provoking.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Crisp, Intelligent Delight, January 29, 2008
By 
RM (Ceti Alpha Five) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Old Physics for New: a worldview alternative to Einstein's relativity theory (Paperback)
Phipps has done great work here. Set aside, for a moment, what you may think of consensus science
versus 'fringe' work. Set aside, too, your beliefs about the verities of Relativity, Maxwell's
equations, and the like. This book is important because it's written as a conversation between the
reader and a very bright and passionate man, a man who knows physics well, mathematics well, and
history very well. I learned things here that were never even hinted at in 4 years of education in
physics. Even the revealed history here is worth the price of admission.

OK, pick up your beliefs about consensus science and relativity now. Worst case: you buy this
book, find fault with it, and use it in your classroom to exercise the students' minds. It will
certainly do that, regardless of the stance of the author!.

I recommend this book enthusiastically for teachers, science historians, science buffs, and very,
very especially, current physics students (sophomore level, who have taken at least a year of
statics/dynamics, a year of EM, a year of quantum, and a semester or two of relativity theory.)
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dissident Physics at its Best, December 20, 2006
By 
bdw000 (Nellysford, VA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Old Physics for New: a worldview alternative to Einstein's relativity theory (Paperback)
For those who are interested in views contrary to Einstein's theories of relativity, this book is a "MUST-HAVE." Phipps is without a doubt the most entertaining writer who disagrees with Einstein and his followers. Phipps appears to be someone who really and truly understands what he is talking about.

If your special interest is the topic of "time," you simply must read this book.

Highly recommended.

If you are a die-hard Einsteinian, why not read the book and then post your critical review here for people like me? I would love to see what the official response is to ideas like these.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Maxwell's Eqns. Rescued from the Universal Error, September 30, 2008
This review is from: Old Physics for New: a worldview alternative to Einstein's relativity theory (Paperback)
Although Einstein said his theory could be overthrown by a single experiment, his current followers heed him not.
As but one of numerous delightfully interesting discussions, Phipps shows how the GPS system is exactly that experiment, in that it establishes that the Now is NOT relative, as Einstein asserted to be the inevitable conseqence of his time-rate symmetry. This symmetry, and its attendant Twin Paradox, was necessary to justify the biggest Procrustean bed of all, Lorentzian SpaceTime, which spatializes time through the Lie of Universal Covariance. Phipps' book proves there is no SpaceTime, only Space and clocks. The central distinction between Einstein's relativity and this, correct one by Phipps is Einstein's denial of a Common Now throughout the Cosmos. GPS couldn't possibly work if that were so, but Einstein is both the Prophet and the Pope of the Church of Physics, and heretics will not be tolerated.
Phipps brilliantly explains the root error behind Einstein's folly, the partial derivatives in the standard exposition (by Heaviside) of Maxwell's Equations are in truth total derivatives. They were only made partial by, in a most Procrustean manner, excluding Faraday's experiments that generated voltage when a wire loop changes shape. Only a total derivative can handle that.
This is a wonderful book, well worth many times its price, but bring some calculus with you.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crisp, clear and invigorating!, December 24, 2008
By 
WHC (Marshall Islands) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Old Physics for New: a worldview alternative to Einstein's relativity theory (Paperback)
Crisp, clear and invigorating! These are words that describe the latest book from renowned dissident physicist Dr. Tom Phipps. His new book goes to battle against the illogic of modern physics by highlighting some of the mistakes and errors associated with the current formulation of electromagnetic field theory and its attempted rescue by special relativity theory (SRT). The avid reader of dissident material will find a treasure trove of new information on this topic, along with a detailed proposal for an experimentum crucis to decide between the validity of SRT and his alternative theory. Readers of Phipps' first book, Heretical Verities, will also find this an indispensable addition to their dissident library.

Old Physics for New makes a key contribution to dissident progress by clearly delineating the inescapable problems in the mathematical formulation of Maxwell's Equations for moving reference frames. The book is not overly heavy on the esoteric equations so characteristic of electromagnetic field theory; but rather, the author uses mathematical description only where appropriate. The reader is treated to Phipps' eloquent writing style in describing the many problems with mainstream theory, and a lively supposition of why science chose the paths that it did. The book makes for quite an enjoyable read, something like a detective novel, because Phipps leads the reader through his alternative neo-Hertzian theory in a clear and uncomplicated manner revealing every clue and every inescapable conclusion along the way.

There are some gratifying details inside. Length invariance and Euclidian geometry reign supreme in Phipps' theory for there is no room for space-time symmetry or length contraction. He also discusses the fact that the Global Positioning System violates SRT on definitional and experimental grounds, resulting in the need to simply ignore SRT so that GPS can be designed to work correctly.

An entire chapter is devoted to the topic of stellar aberration, which to the reader's delight, does an outstanding job of explaining the history of stellar aberration, what it is, how it occurs, and why it is irreconcilable with SRT.

Based on the experimental evidence, there is a need for time dilation. The author has devoted two chapters to clock rate asymmetry and "collective" time. Clock compensation is discussed in considerable detail from a pragmatic standpoint involving the actual nuts and bolts of clock compensation ---- not the mind-numbing thought experiments involving trains so beloved of some in the mainstream. Dirty little experimental secrets and cold hard logic abound here.

Most importantly, Phipps throws down the gauntlet to mainstream relativists with two proposals for a decisive test of his alternative neo-Hertzian theory versus SRT. First, he proposes a measurement of the angle of stellar aberration using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), an experiment that can be performed using present-day technology. Second, he proposes an experiment for light speed measurement in a free-falling inertial system, the outcome of which could require the reformulation of the relativity principle as currently understood.

This is the stuff of scientific revolutions and well worth the price for a front-row seat.
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Old Physics for New: a worldview alternative to Einstein's relativity theory
Old Physics for New: a worldview alternative to Einstein's relativity theory by Thomas E. Phipps (Paperback - December 1, 2006)
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