Ole Coltrane

January 1, 1998 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
18:18
2
10:49
3
7:45
4
9:00


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 1998
  • Release Date: January 1, 1998
  • Label: Rhino Atlantic
  • Copyright: 2005 Atlantic Recording Corp. Manufactured & Marketed by Warner Strategic Marketing
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 45:52
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00122DBHY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #79,968 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
30
4 star
7
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 38 customer reviews
All the musicianship is great.
Forest Evermore
Of all the albums John Coltrane made for Atlantic in 1959-61, "Ole Coltrane" is the most often overlooked, yet it is one of his great early masterpieces.
Michael B. Richman
Coltrane's 4 minute solo to close out the piece is incredible, one of his best ever on the soprano.
G B

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Tyler Smith on February 23, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Despite some big names gracing it ("Giant Steps," "My Favorite Things"), Coltrane's Atlantic discography sometimes gets overlooked. "Ole," released in 1961, is one of Coltrane's better, if often overlooked, Atlantic releases.
The CD benefits greatly from the inclusion of "To Her Ladyship," which first appeared as an "Untitled Original Ballad" on the Atlantic vinyl release "The Coltrane Legacy." It's a fine example of Coltrane's lyrical power with a ballad, and he is aided by Eric Dolphy on flute and Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, both in fine form. With these three, the ballad is never sappy or cloying. Instead, it's a powerful emotional statement.
Another high point is the delicate McCoy Tyner composition "Aisha." Coltrane limns the melody with little or no embellishment, letting the tune's lovely melody carry the listener along.
The title tune, however, allows Coltrane to unleash his power, which emerges in a searing soprano solo that I can never listen to without getting completely swept up. Coltrane used the two-bass drone (Reggie Workman and Art Davis), over which all the players soar, including Dolphy (disguised on the original release as "George Lane" because of contractual problems), who again displays his prowess on flute.
For listeners interested in chronicling Coltrane's musical journey, this is a great CD to have. He explores minor, Eastern-based themes and displays his touch with a ballad. The great quartet had not yet formed (Jimmy Garrison is absent here), but it's getting close. And the inclusion of Dolphy presages the Impulse release, "Live at the Village Vanguard," which displays Eric's short tenure with the band.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By John P. Morgan VINE VOICE on April 28, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I know that I'll probably get flack for saying this, but this recording might even be a little better than Coltrane's masterpiece, A Love Supreme...okay, okay...it's not better because it is in a class all by itself and cannot be judged as better than/worse than. it's something that stands out all on its own.

It's only four songs, but each one is just a mindblower. The title track is crazy good. I remember listening to it with my then girlfriend (now my wfe) and she said, "What's this cacaphony?" To this day I still harbor a bit of resentment towards her for saying that because to me that piece of music just pulls out all the stops and makes you realize that Coltrane was no ordinary composer...no ordinary musician...no ordinary human being.

Here was a man that had a thumb on the pulse of his own soul. Here was a man that could translate the sounds, the squeals, and the squalls of the angels. This CD belongs to every music fan's collection. This is not just for diehard jazz fans, this is for music lovers everywhere.

Love yourself a little more and buy this CD. It's flippin' fantastic!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By spoonyjoefromdownbelow on May 24, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I'm writing this review to concur with what has already been said--this is a great Coltrane album. The title track is good enough to stand alongside "Acknowledgement" from A Love Supreme, which is about the highest compliment I can give a jazz song.

One of the better parts of this CD is the contribution of the other players. The rest of the band contributes as much to the songs as Coltrane, and to great effect. There aren't as many lengthy Trane solos, which I usually enjoy but at times find tedious (I know, I know, it's almost sacreligious to suggest such a thing). On the title track, Elvin Jones works his drum kit, and in particular his cymbals, as beautifully as anything on a Love Supreme. The title track also features Eric Dolphy's flute and a stunning two-bass solo section that is one of the more unique and wonderful moments in my entire jazz collection.

This is a solid set of music all around-- not a single song here is filler. If you like Coltrane's music from this period, you should definitely add this to your collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Nick Tropiano on October 17, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Ole is not generally found in (worthless) big box record stores, and is one of the somewhat more "obscure" (if there can be such a thing in regard to Trane) titles in Coltrane's prolific catalogue. As such, it is a collection that is overshadowed by albums/CDs like Giant Steps, A Love Supreme, Live at Birdland, and even Ascension. Even the local jazz stations seem to give short-shift to Ole.

However, if - like me, you enjoy Coltrane but have put off getting Ole - or are unfamiliar with it, you are in for a real treat. The hypnotic title track, Ole, ranks with Coltrane's very best compositions. It is remeniscent of India from the Impressions CD but it's more accessible and somehow is more surreal without being full-throttle avanteguard. To Her Ladyship is simply a beautiful jazz ballad, with some unique and evocative flute solos courtesy of Eric Dolphy. Aisha - probably the most familiar track from Ole, is as another jazz ballad gem with some nice trumpet by Freddie Hubbard

Ole is powerful and hypnotic grouping of Coltrane compositions. It's pointless to "rank" collections or say one is "better than" this one or that when speaking of the true giants like Trane. For whatever reason, Ole has been somewhat overshadowed and to a degree overlooked. None-the-less, to me it's right up there with Coltrane's adknowledged masterpieces.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?