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Ole Doc Methuselah Audio CD – Abridged, Audiobook, CD


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Galaxy Audio; First Edition, Abridged edition (April 15, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592123937
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592123933
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 6.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,945,744 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Delightful, amazing and filled with wonder!" Robert Silverberg


 

"One thing Hubbard did well was buckle a mean swash. (It) is fast moving action and a lot of fun." —F.M. Busby




“A brilliant sci-fi author??. . .” —??New York Daily News


“L. Ron Hubbard remains one of science fiction’s most romantic writers and Ole Doc Methuselah is one of his larger than life characters.” —??Atlanta Journal-Constitution

About the Author

With 19 New York Times bestsellers and more than 230 million copies of his works in circulation, L. Ron Hubbard is among the most acclaimed and widely read authors of our time. As a leading light of American Pulp Fiction through the 1930s and '40s, he is further among the most influential authors of the modern age. Indeed, from Ray Bradbury to Stephen King, there is scarcely a master of imaginative tales who has not paid tribute to L. Ron Hubbard.



More About the Author

With 19 New York Times bestsellers and more than 280 million copies of his works in circulation, L. Ron Hubbard is among the most acclaimed and widely read authors of our time. As a leading light of American Pulp Fiction through the 1930s and '40s, he is further among the most influential authors of the modern age. Indeed, from Ray Bradbury to Stephen King, there is scarcely a master of imaginative tales who has not paid tribute to L. Ron Hubbard.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Raymond L. Whalin on August 4, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is one of my all time favorite stories and one of the earliest Science-Fiction/Fastasy tales I ever read. The style is classic early Sci-fi and the humor is rollicking and delightful. The material is a bit dated but it is still a great fun read!

Lance Whalin
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By C. Chang on March 9, 2005
Format: Audio Cassette
It's interesting to see either complete hatred or unreserved praise for this, or all of Hubbard's book for that matter. In my opinion, neither are quite deserved. Quick disclaimer: unlike one of the reviewers below, all I know about Hubbard was that he founded Scientology which is really quite silly. I am really just reviewing the book.

Ole Doc Methuselah is a space-western. It is not sophiscated 'hard science fiction' and if read as such will generate a lot of frustration. For the most part, the author has his tongue firmly in the cheek and this shows. I mean - how can you take a hero (or the universe he inhabits) that fixes a planetary system's entire socio-political problems by 3 hours of plastic surgery seriously?!?!? There is some science though - for example Hubbard's description of TB sounds very much first hand; the use of omnipotent germ-cells to help regenerate tissue is a serious research discipline today; and the use of 'rays' much unheard of in the 30s & 40s for medical care is now reflected in the well-developed specialty of radiation oncology. What people need to remember is that this book, like many of the 'golden age' stories was written in the 40s and some parts are unavoidably dated.

But the series of short stories do manage to entertain very well. The style is unsophisticated but clear, with the occasional laugh-out-loud passages. The plots are fun and with some completely unlooked for and often improbable twists. The main characters - that is Ole Doc and Hippocrates, are vividly drawn and their conversation really flows. In my opinion, a book that entertained me and made me laugh is worth at least 3 stars - even if it is by a controversial author and will never win the Nobel Prize for literature.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul Camp on September 22, 2009
Format: Paperback
The Ole Doc Methuselah stories are a series of seven novelettes that L. Ron Hubbard wrote for _Astounding_ between 1947 and 1950 under the pseudonym of Rene Lafayette. They remained uncollected for twenty years, but they were finally assembled as _Ole Doc Methuselah_ (1970), complete with a page explaining why L. Ron Hubbard was a Benifactor to Humanity. I do not have all of the stories in their original magazine form, but I do have a few of them. It looks as if few changes were made from magazine to book form.

The stories are about a human medical man with an alien sidekick who flies about the galaxy solving medical problems that are usually linked with skulduggery and planetary social troubles. Science fiction readers may notice a faint similarity with Murray Leinster's later Med Service stories, about a human medical man with an alien sidekick who flies about the galaxy solving medical problems that are usually linked with skulduggery and planetary social troubles.

There are some differences between the series. Leinster's stories are better crafted, more logical, and more scientifically savvy. But Hubbard's tales have a splash, color, and flamboyance that is lacking in the Med Service series. All of the stories are passably entertaining. My favorite yarns in this collection are the title story, in which Doc goes on a fishing trip that leads him into a ruthless planetary real estate scam; "Her Majesty's Aberration," in which Doc's absent-mindedness takes him to a planet that most of us would be happy to avoid; and "Plague," in which an old-fashioned solution is found to a new-fangled problem.

One story, "The Great Air Monopoly," makes use of a longish footnote about the United Medical Society (U.M.S.) from a fictitious future history by Hubbard.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Paul Camp on September 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The Ole Doc Methuselah stories are a series of seven novelettes that L. Ron Hubbard wrote for _Astounding_ between 1947 and 1950 under the pseudonym of Rene Lafayette. They remained uncollected for twenty years but were finally assembled as _Ole Doc Methuselah_ (1970), complete with a page explaining why L. Ron Hubbard was a Benifactor to Humanity. I do not have all of the stories in their original magazine form, but I have a few of them. It looks as if few changes were made from magazine to book form.

The stories are about a human medical man with an alien sidekick who flies about space solving medical problems that are usually linked with skulduggery and social troubles. Science fiction readers may notice a faint resemblance to Murray Leinster's later Med Service stories about a human medical man with an alien sidekick who flies about space solving medical problems that are usually linked with skulduggery and social troubles.

There are some differences between the series. Leinster's stories are better crafted, more logical, and more scientifically savvy. But Hubbard's tales have a splash, color, and flamboyance that is lacking in the Med Service stories. My favorite stories are the title story, in which a fishing trip on an alien planet lands Doc in the middle of a real estate [...]; "Her Majesty's Aberration," in which a moment of absent-mindedness leads Doc off-course to a planet most of us would rather avoid; and "Plague," about an old-fashioned solution to a new-fangled problem.

But there are moments of unintended irony for me:

"My man," said Ole Doc, "your precious bombs were one of the oldest known buncombes in medical history. A Propellant and ephidrine, that's all. Ephidrine barely permits the allergy patient to breathe.
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