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Olive Kitteridge: Fiction [Kindle Edition]

Elizabeth Strout
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (914 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $15.00
Kindle Price: $8.06
You Save: $6.94 (46%)
Sold by: Random House LLC

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Book Description

WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE

In a voice more powerful and compassionate than ever before, New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth Strout binds together thirteen rich, luminous narratives into a book with the heft of a novel, through the presence of one larger-than-life, unforgettable character: Olive Kitteridge.

At the edge of the continent, Crosby, Maine, may seem like nowhere, but seen through this brilliant writer’s eyes, it’s in essence the whole world, and the lives that are lived there are filled with all of the grand human drama–desire, despair, jealousy, hope, and love.

At times stern, at other times patient, at times perceptive, at other times in sad denial, Olive Kitteridge, a retired schoolteacher, deplores the changes in her little town and in the world at large, but she doesn’t always recognize the changes in those around her: a lounge musician haunted by a past romance: a former student who has lost the will to live: Olive’s own adult child, who feels tyrannized by her irrational sensitivities; and Henry, who finds his loyalty to his marriage both a blessing and a curse.

As the townspeople grapple with their problems, mild and dire, Olive is brought to a deeper understanding of herself and her life–sometimes painfully, but always with ruthless honesty. Olive Kitteridge offers profound insights into the human condition–its conflicts, its tragedies and joys, and the endurance it requires.

BONUS: This edition includes an excerpt from Elizabeth Strout’s The Burgess Boys.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Thirteen linked tales from Strout (Abide with Me, etc.) present a heart-wrenching, penetrating portrait of ordinary coastal Mainers living lives of quiet grief intermingled with flashes of human connection. The opening Pharmacy focuses on terse, dry junior high-school teacher Olive Kitteridge and her gregarious pharmacist husband, Henry, both of whom have survived the loss of a psychologically damaged parent, and both of whom suffer painful attractions to co-workers. Their son, Christopher, takes center stage in A Little Burst, which describes his wedding in humorous, somewhat disturbing detail, and in Security, where Olive, in her 70s, visits Christopher and his family in New York. Strout's fiction showcases her ability to reveal through familiar details—the mother-of-the-groom's wedding dress, a grandmother's disapproving observations of how her grandchildren are raised—the seeds of tragedy. Themes of suicide, depression, bad communication, aging and love, run through these stories, none more vivid or touching than Incoming Tide, where Olive chats with former student Kevin Coulson as they watch waitress Patty Howe by the seashore, all three struggling with their own misgivings about life. Like this story, the collection is easy to read and impossible to forget. Its literary craft and emotional power will surprise readers unfamiliar with Strout. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* “Hell. We’re always alone. Born alone. Die alone,” says Olive Kitteridge, redoubtable seventh-grade math teacher in Crosby, Maine. Anyone who gets in Olive’s way had better watch out, for she crashes unapologetically through life like an emotional storm trooper. She forces her husband, Henry, the town pharmacist, into tactical retreat; and she drives her beloved son, Christopher, across the country and into therapy. But appalling though Olive can be, Strout  manages to make her deeply human and even sympathetic, as are all of the characters in this “novel in stories.” Covering a period of 30-odd years, most of the stories (several of which were previously published in the New Yorker and other magazines) feature Olive as  their focus, but in some she is bit player or even a footnote while other characters take center stage to sort through their own fears and insecurities. Though loneliness and loss haunt these pages, Strout also supplies gentle humor and a nourishing dose of hope. People are sustained by the rhythms of ordinary life and the natural wonders of coastal Maine, and even Olive is sometimes caught off guard by life’s baffling beauty. Strout is also the author of the well-received Amy and Isabelle (1999) and Abide with Me (2006). --Mary Ellen Quinn

Product Details

  • File Size: 450 KB
  • Print Length: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Random House; 1 edition (March 25, 2008)
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0013TRR80
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,626 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
936 of 958 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Snapshots of a Complex Woman March 28, 2008
Format:Hardcover
I am not normally a fan of short stories. While I appreciate the technical abilities of the short story writer, I find "shortness" troublesome. Generally, the longer a book is, the more appealing. Consequently, I was initially leery of the descriptions of Elizabeth Strout's newest novel, "Olive Kitteridge," which calls itself "a novel in stories."

All of the stories in this book occur in the town of Crosby, Maine. At the center of many of the book's stories is the person, Olive Kitteridge, a retired teacher. In the stories that don't feature Olive, her name may appear only once in an effort to tie it to the larger work. That the stories center on one town, and a limited number of that town's inhabitants, who also reappear from time to time, I did not encounter my usual problems with short stories. This book gently reminded me of what is best about short-stories: a brief slice of a life, a snapshot that tells a complete-enough story. In having all these stories bound together, one feels a bit like the proverbial "fly on the wall"; a fly who may spend most of, but certainly not all, it's time in one particularly interesting home (Olive's).

I especially enjoyed reading about Olive in her post-retirement years, the ways in which she deals with other people and herself. In many ways, I can identify with Olive, having doled out bits of malice in angering situations; or having been soft and tender-hearted during others. Like Olive, I too have been both fool and sage.

I really enjoyed "Olive Kitteridge." Olive is a complex person vacillating between viciousness and compassion. In the way all people are puzzles, so is Olive. In one story she does something deplorable, in another she potentially saves a life.
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268 of 290 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Heart Aches April 30, 2008
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
These stories of small town life in Maine linked through one woman, Olive Kitteridge are so emotionally honest and resonated so deeply, I felt literally fragile after I finished. I bought the book knowing nothing about it besides the fact the stories were linked, based merely on how much I had loved her previous novel, 'Abide With Me'. I liked this even more. I adored the character of Olive so much, and could almost see her in front of me when she opened her mouth to speak. Strout is an exceptionally writer who mines human emotion for literary gold. Highly, highly recommended.
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360 of 392 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I've read all 3 Elizabeth Strout novels May 30, 2008
Format:Hardcover
Having read all three Elizabeth Strout novels, I'd place Olive Kitteridge behind the other two. Do not get me wrong, Strout is still an exceptional writer, weaving you into each chapter and describing things beautifully.

You know that feeling when you're just starting a book? Getting acquainted with the characters? Trying to remember their names, their personalities, what they look like and the surroundings are just coming into focus? This entire book has that feeling because essentially each chapter is a different story. With the exception of Olive, you never hear about a character beyond one chapter. It's as if twenty books were collected, a chapter ripped from each, and placed in this single book. You're introduced, learn the character and are drawn to their story and then it's onto somebody else, never to return and find any conclusions.

I just did not like the separation between story lines. True, this is meant to be a small town collaboration, with Olive as the center character, but sometimes it was a stretch. One particular chapter only mentions Olive once, in a fragment of a sentence that just mentions Olive was the character's teacher in school. Sometimes it just didn't seem the connection was enough to warrant that particular character's inclusion of the story of Olive and ended up being more of a distraction than an addition.

There are also a lot of overlapping details and re-telling of facts. Each person knows Olive, so you hear numerous times her description and certain facts in her life, concerning her marriage or her son. At the end you are very connected to Olive and it is a wonderful character and story.
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49 of 51 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A deep map of emotional lives April 29, 2008
Format:Hardcover
OLIVE KITTERIDGE by Elizabeth Strout is a "novel" of short stories, some of which have appeared in magazines like the New Yorker and Ms. The stories tell of small-town Maine residents who all struggle with relationships and, really, the quest to feel known. Each story can and could stand alone, but the book doesn't read like a collection of separate works, but rather as a description of people of a common place (Maisy Mills, Maine), who all know a common character (Olive Kitteridge) and who all struggle with the fundamental problem of the author's theme, trying not to feel alone, completely alone.

Many of the stories do deal with Olive or her family directly, and we come to know her throughout the book, through her husband's experience of "crushing" on an employee in the first story to her own experiences as she ages and her life changes by the final story. But in other stories, she is a minor character, perhaps mentioned briefly as the main character's former math teacher in high school or as someone another character does not like.

And this aspect become fundamental and almost a secondary theme of the book. As Olive herself remembers her own serious flirtation with another man ("... she had the sensation that she had been seen. And she had not even known she'd felt invisible" [p. 213].), and progresses through later stages of life, we come to see that she is not perfectly lovable -- or perhaps not lovable at all, up close. But she still needs intimacy. "Sometimes, like now, Olive had a sense of just how desperately hard every person in the world was working to get what they needed" (p. 211). She is an emotional anti-hero, and through Strout's tender writing, we do love her.

One of my favorite stories was "Starving" which deals nimbly with all of these subjects, and doesn't feature Olive primarily. Strout's writing is straight-forward, but thoughtful and tender. These people became real to me. I miss them now that I have finished the book.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Olive's negative, grumpy nature made it difficult to see ...
Olive's negative, grumpy nature made it difficult to see the redeeming qualities in this work. It was far to depressing.
Published 1 day ago by cover to cover member
5.0 out of 5 stars Words fail
This book is wonderful. What a writer, no wonder she won the Pulitzer Prize for this amazing work. Each character has a distinct clear voice and personality. Read more
Published 1 day ago by Readerease
4.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing read
Captivating storyline of characters within a small community and their intersecting paths, sometimes incongruous, centered around an insecure and often gruff yet blatantly honest... Read more
Published 2 days ago by Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars A haunting book.
I loved the way all the chapters, (short stories), were connected together by the simple truths of life in a small town and the powerful and complex personality of Olive... Read more
Published 5 days ago by Began45
2.0 out of 5 stars ... talents of a gifted writer but I would have liked to have seen...
I can appreciate the talents of a gifted writer but I would have liked to have seen those talents used in a more engaging story. Read more
Published 5 days ago by D.Penn
4.0 out of 5 stars I am glad I read it
It is certainly a well written book. Some of the stories are more interesting than others. I am glad I read it, but I felt that The Burgess Boys was a superior book. Read more
Published 8 days ago by robert tubbs
3.0 out of 5 stars Not my favorite.
I liked The Burgess Boys so well, that I went in search of another by Ms. Strout, but was disappointed. Read more
Published 8 days ago by Dianne Cinnamon
4.0 out of 5 stars I like the way the stories all come together
I like the way the stories all come together. I know someone alot like Olive so it was relatable.
Published 11 days ago by Rachelle Verbeck
3.0 out of 5 stars Reads like a series of short stories
This is the first book by Elizabeth Strout that I have read. Her prose is wonderful as is her character development. Read more
Published 15 days ago by AmyC
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book
Olive Kitteridge is a complex person who seems to exist in her own world on the outskirts of life. Olive is a scary person - even her grown up son is scared of her and as a teacher... Read more
Published 15 days ago by Catherine
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More About the Author

Elizabeth Strout is the author of the New York Times bestseller Olive Kitteridge, for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize; the national bestseller Abide with Me; and Amy and Isabelle, winner of the Los Angeles Times Art Seidenbaum Award and the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize. She has also been a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize in London. She lives in Maine and New York City.

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