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Oliver Button Is a Sissy Paperback – May 30, 1979


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 480L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; Reissue edition (May 30, 1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0156681404
  • ISBN-13: 978-0156681407
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 6.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #65,791 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Even though Oliver doesn't win first prize at a talent show, his parents and classmates cease their jeering of his "sissy" pursuits. Ages 4-8.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Even though Oliver doesn't win first prize at a talent show, his parents and classmates cease their jeering of his "sissy" pursuits. Ages 4-8. (Publishers Weekly ) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

"Tomie dePaola was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1934 to a family of Irish and Italian background. By the time he could hold a pencil, he knew what his life's work would be. His determination to create books for children led to a BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and an MFA from the California College of Arts & Crafts in Oakland, California.
It drove him through the years of teaching, designing greeting cards and stage sets, and painting church murals until 1965, when he illustrated his first children's book, Sound, by Lisa Miller for Coward-McCann. Eventually, freed of other obligations, he plunged full time into both writing and illustrating children's books.
He names Fra Angelico and Giotto, Georges Rouault, and Ben Shahn as major influences on his work, but he soon found his own unique style. His particular way with color, line, detail, and design have earned him many of the most prestigious awards in his field, among them a Caldecott Honor Award for Strega Nona, the Smithsonian Medal from the Smithsonian Institution, the Kerlan Award from the University of Minnesota for his ""singular attainment in children's literature,"" the Catholic Library Association's Regina Medal for his ""continued distinguished contribution,"" and the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion. He was also the 1990 United States nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for illustration.
Tomie dePaola has published almost 200 children's books in fifteen different countries. He remains one of the most popular creators of books for children, receiving more than 100,000 fan letters each year.
Tomie lives in an interesting house in New Hampshire with his four dogs. His studio is in a large renovated 200-year-old barn.
- He has been published for over 30 years.
- Over 5 million copies of his books have sold worldwide.
- His books have been published in over 15 different countries.
- He receives nearly 100,000 fan letters each year.
Tomie dePaola has received virtually every significant recognition for his books in the children's book world, including:
- Caldecott Honor Award from American Library Association
- Newbery Honor Award from American Library Association
- Smithson Medal from Smithsonian Institution
- USA nominee in illustration for Hans Christian Andersen Medal
- Regina Medal from Catholic Library Association

"

Customer Reviews

This is an excellent story for pre-k-2nd graders.
Joel D. Ealy
That is the very special, very important message of OLIVER BUTTON IS A SISSY.
Karen Joan
The illustrations are so expressive and it is beautifully written.
AV, Children's Book Store Owner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Jones on June 23, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is an excellent book that confronts gender stereotypes and the importance of accepting people for who they are. Oliver Button does not engage in the traditional activities that boys do, and thus, he is faced with repercussions and consequences (based on how others feel Oliver should behave/act). I teach fourth grade and - though a picture book - it is the ideal book to discuss self-confidence and diversity and the significance of accepting individuals while recognizing their accomplishments and contributions.
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Dawn Warner on May 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
In this day and age of name calling and teasing, this is an important book to have around to teach children some important values. Oliver Button is a boy who likes to do things that not "all other boys" do such as dance. The other boys at school often tease him and call him names. Even his own father thinks he should do more "boy things". However, Oliver proves that he has his own talents and he is a star for being himself and doing what he likes to do and what he is good at. If you are familiar with Tomie DePaola's other works, this is yet another one of his fantastic books for children.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Sara Krepp on February 3, 2002
Format: Paperback
I watched a special on TV about this book. It's a story about a little boy who gets picked on and eventually finds good things about himself. It was similar to what my nephew experiences in school. He is a boy who loves playing with the girls and isn't real "tough", so he has a hard time with some kids. This book was wonderful for him to read. I sent it to him through amazon. He got it in the mail, read it that night and then took it to school and read it to the class the very next day! He brought home a special award for sharing such a wonderful book! I think all teachers should share this with their classrooms and use it as a way to address bullying!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book. It is about a little boy named Oliver Button. This little boy doesn't really care what other people think, he likes to do what he thinks is fun, and that is it. He doesn't do normal things like other boys, he dances, and jumps rope for exercise. He got a new pair of tap shoes and the older boys teased him and called him a sissy and wrote it on the wall. Oliver still kept going to dance school and practicing and practicing.
When there is a talent competition, Oliver signs up to be in it. During the competition he did a tap routine and ends up losing. His parents still thought of him as a champion and when he goes back to school, instead of Oliver Button is a sissy on the wall it says Oliver Button is a star. I would recommend this book to a lot of people because this is a very entertaining book. It shows that if you have fun doing something thats a little different, keep doing it no matter what other people say.
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47 of 58 people found the following review helpful By John Smith on July 26, 2005
Format: Paperback
I bought this book because Oliver Button is very much like I was at his age. He is more interested in playing with girls and doing activities that are not usually done by boys. I also thought it would be a good way to teach children that they don't have to conform to gender roles. However, having worked with elementary school children in various settings for years, I found the story to be very unrealistic.

The beginning is good. We are presented with a feel for Oliver's dificulties. Everyone wants him to be more like other boys. His father wants him to play sports, but he wants to dance instead. His mother enrolls him in a dance school, and he learns how to dance. He perseveres despite the fact that his peers are pestering him for being a "sissy"; they even write "Oliver Button Is A Sissy" on the wall (hence the title). The girls defend him by giving the bullies a talking-to. The bullies stop beating him up, which is a bit unrealistic; boys who are bullies hate girls as much as they hate boys like Oliver.

I was disappointed by the ending. Near the end, Oliver signs up for a talent show. His act involves tap dancing. The other children in his class, at the teacher's suggestion, go to see him perform. If you think this seems unrealistic (why would children who hate Oliver go to see him perform?), you will be even more disappointed by the last page, when Oliver goes to school after the talent show (which he didn't win) and finds that the wall no longer reads "Oliver Button Is A Sissy" because the word "sissy" has been crossed out and replaced with "star." Just because he does a performance doesn't mean those who formerly hated him will like him. I know this because I tried it myself at his age!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
Once Oliver did thing that girls did. He didn't play with boys or didn't play any spots. All he did was to play with paper dolls, pick flowers, jump rope, draw and dance. He asked his mother if he could take some dance lessons so he went to Mrs. Leah's dancing class with other boys and girls.
My favortie part was when every one said he was a star at tap dancing because he has been practicing really hard at home and at Mrs. Leah's class. At home he was practicing when he got home from school everyday.
Tomie made it for his mother named Flossie his mother is still alive. His mother is in her 90s.
I liked it when he practiced with his black pair of tap shoes and when a girl told the other kids to leave him alone two girls said to five boys in the schoolyard.
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