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Oliver Twist (Collector's Library) Hardcover – August 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Collector's Library
  • Hardcover: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Collector's Library; New edition (August 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904633080
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904633082
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 3.8 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #417,070 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jackie L. Adams on November 7, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Set in early 19th century London England, Oliver Twist is an insider's look at the life of paupers,dirty lowlife criminals,andpickpockets.It takes you from a parish workhouse,to the poverty-stricken streets of south London,to the high society in Pentonville.
The story begins when a young woman bearing child,withered and and drenched to the bone,shows up at the parish workhouse.She gives birth to a boy and dies.That boy is Oliver Twist.
Oliver is underfed,overworked and treated with contempt throughout his entire childhood.When he enters the parish workhouse at age 9 he is picked by fellow parish boys to "ask for more" with tragic results.He is marked impertinent and contemptible and is offered along with 5 pounds to anyone who will apprentice him(and therefore take him off the workhouse's hands).
Throughout his many adventures(and there are many)Oliver comes across such characters as Fagin,a corrupt old Jew with a band of pickpockets,Bill Sikes,a brutal,violent robber, and the mysterious Mr. Monks,whose connection and interest in oliver is unknown,
The book's many twists and turns,revealing Oliver's history little by little keeps you interested,while the sweet,kind and gentle nature of Oliver keeps you rooting for him to the end.Dickens'ingenious plot and witty remarks make this book a true classic.

Some readers may be disappointed by the lack of details relating to oliver's origin,wich, although complex,are fully described in the book's last few pages and are difficult to relate to the rest of the story.
Dickens was only 26 when he wrote Oliver Twist,it being only his second book published.Although some readers may declare it melodramatic,and there are a number of questionable coincidences throughout the story,Dickens is a truly remarkable storyteller and the book is well worth the read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bill Slocum VINE VOICE on June 22, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Does anyone enjoy "Oliver Twist" nearly so much when things are going well for the novel's young protagonist as when they are going badly? Do you notice how quickly you scan the pages when names like "Mr. Brownlow" "Rose" and "Mr. Losberne" are in the text, only slowing down when it's "Fagin" "Sikes" and "Mr. Bumble"?

Cruelty can be a positive quality when writing fiction. Dickens' torture test for his young hero saves the book from mawkish excess and, along with an uncompromising social conscience, gives it readability and drive.

Oliver Twist is a miserable orphan, his birth a mistake and his life a matter of no consequence to anyone but himself. Yet time and again, a guiding hand of mysterious providence suggests something of deeper importance connected to the business of his life. This is so even when he finds himself in the London underworld, under the guileful care of the master thief Fagin, who bestows praise upon Oliver's eager ears while coaching him down a criminal path where only a scaffold awaits.

A bit overlong, yes. "It is a tale told of grief and trial, and sorrow, young man, and such tales usually are; if it were one of unmixed joy and happiness, it would be very brief."

Though it is ironic how that formula works in reverse in "Oliver Twist", one understands what Mr. Brownlow means by that statement. The narrative of "Oliver Twist" covers a lot of ground, and presents a strong case for the reasonless cruelty of life even as it argues for humanistic compassion. If there is any release from life's savagery, it may only be found in death or dreams.

In his introduction to my Signet Classic edition, Edward Le Comte notes the "fairy tale" quality of "Oliver Twist" as a license for its sentimentality.
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Format: Kindle Edition
To be honest, I have developed more of an appreciation of Charles Dickens since I got older. As a high school student, and even as a college student, I kindof felt like his books were something to be endured. Now as I got older, I feel like I can honestly get some enjoyment out of them. I really don’t feel like this book is as good as some of his others though. Oliver is a young orphan who runs away from his workhouse only to be taken in by a den of thieves. I felt this book was kindof ridiculous. Oliver wasn’t even likable for me. We’re supposed to feel sorry for him because he is half-starved, mistreated, and alone in the world. But really he just comes across as a sniveling, irritating weakling. Dickens brings to light the hypocrisy and hatefulness of the elite Victorian society and their attitude toward the poor, but in the end, it just comes across as a hateful and over-dramatic book.
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By Kim Casady on March 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An excellent story. It keeps moving at a constant pace and I enjoy trying to decipher the old world langauge.
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By Whiteboy on January 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I chose this rating because this is an awesome book and I would highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys a good read.
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Format: Hardcover
Dicken's understatement is potent enough to kill at a hundred paces, with laughter. The creepy thief lord ends every sentence with the address "my dear;" the overdressed Beetle complains when shivering paupers make him feel cold; and those who beat Oliver are encouraged because how else would a child ever learn?
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