Buy New
$13.96
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $10.99 (44%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Oliver Stone's USA: Film, History, and Controversy Paperback – June 27, 2000


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.96
$8.18 $5.96

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Have the next big idea for a movie? Submit a 2-15 min. concept video to Amazon Studios for a chance to have your movie made. Learn more.


Frequently Bought Together

Oliver Stone's USA: Film, History, and Controversy + Thinking In Pictures: The Making Of The Movie Matewan
Price for both: $28.42

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Culture America
  • Paperback: 340 pages
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas (June 27, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0700612572
  • ISBN-13: 978-0700612574
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.3 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,223,969 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Over the years, Hollywood has presented many exciting, if highly unrealistic and inaccurate, portrayals of historical events from the Crusades to the U.S. bombing of Iraq, and hardly anyone has complained. But since the debut of Stone's first major Hollywood movie, Salvador, and on through Platoon, JFK, The Doors and Nixon, the accuracy of the filmmaker's historical interpretations, his intentions and integrity have been continually questioned and often attacked by journalists, politicians and critics. Toplin, professor of history at the University of North Carolina, brings Stone and his critics together in 15 essays that make up a contentious and revealing dialogue. In dueling essays in the book's opening section, Robert A. Rosentone and Stone debate the idea of "the filmmaker" (and Stone in particular) as historian. Stone denies the charge of many critics that he sees himself as a "cinematic historian," claiming instead to be an artist with his own vision. The real intellectual conflict, however, occurs in the volume's second and third sections. Here nine film critics and political commentatorsAincluding David Halberstam, James R. Farr and Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.Awrite critically of Stone's "indefensible" interpretations of history. After they have had their say, Stone presents two defensive but convincing essays in which he neatly and often wittily exposes the unspoken agendas, preconceptions and factual inaccuracies in much of the criticism. By the end, Toplin's compilation is more than just an explication of Stone's work; it affords a deeper inquiry into how political ideas and "history" are constructed and conveyed to mass audiences. (June) FYI: Orenstein has a two-year jump on Susan Faludi, who will cover the territory in a book recently sold to Metropolitan Books for publication in 2002.
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Filmmaker Oliver Stone (Platoon, Wall Street, JFK) is viewed as either a perceptive chronicler of recent U.S. history or a na ve believer in antidemocratic cabals. Undoubtedly, he is an artist who unlike many contemporary directors can draw on momentous personal life experiences (such as service in Vietnam) to add depth to his vision. This gives him common ground with the pilots, race car drivers, and adventurers who directed the classical Hollywood cinema. Here, Stone's cinematic versions of history are critiqued by such writers and historians as Walter LaFeber, David Halberstam, Stephen Ambrose, Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., and Le Ly Hayslip, the subject of his film Heaven and Earth. Toplin (history, Univ. of North Carolina, Wilmington; History by Hollywood) gives Stone the opportunity to respond to his critics and assessors, which he does, sometimes reasonably, occasionally shrilly. (Surely Gerald Posner, in his book Case Closed, had the right to counter legions of conspiracy theorists with a well-argued case that John Kennedy was killed by the mentally disturbed misfit Lee Harvey Oswald.) Including a biography of Stone, this is an essential addition to film, history, and American culture collections.DKim Holston, American Inst. for Chartered Property Casualty Underwriters, Malvern, PA
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "franksoprano" on March 3, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Since "Salvador" in 1985, Oliver Stone has kept humorless historians, political journalists and right wing reactionaries flinching.
"Platoon" (1986) was the first motion picture that actually depicted the lives of the "grunts" fighting in Vietnam, completely oliberating the absolute stupidity of John Wayne's jingositic film of "The Green Berets" in 1968.
"Born On The Fourth of July" portrayed the pain and suffering of many Vietnam vets returning home to a society that seemed callous and indifferent.
In 1991, Stone became the first commercial filmmaker with any clout to take on the morass of details surrounding the Kennedy assassination.
Can a man who makes movies based on historical events actually be classified as an historian?
That seems to be the fundamental question surrounding "Oliver Stone's USA," a fabulous new book, edited by Brent Toplin.
The first section of the book is devoted to a series of essays, both pro and con Stone, from writers like David Halberstam and Steven Ambrose (who writes a particularly nasty piece on "Nixon").
The book's second section gives Stone a chance to respond to the critics and that he does eloquently (noting at one point that neither Stephen Ambrose nor John Wayne ever served a minute in combat).
The volume of attacks on Stone for "JFK" from political pundits like George Will, Alexander Cockburn, Tom Wicker et al may have been prompted by the knowledge that Stone reaches more people with one showing of his films that they do writing a lifetime of columns.
"Oliver Stone's USA" is a book that should be read by anyone who has an interest in both the power of motion pictures and the dark side of recent American history.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Robert Blake on June 30, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Oliver Stone is one of the most brilliant and provocative filmmakers working today and in this book we get a great taste of the debate over his work from both sides of the field. The book as a whole is very readable and never boring. Stone fans (like myself) and Stone bashers alike will get a good kick out of this book. The essay and responses to critics that Stone writes are fascinating, informative and speak to the free intellectual spirit and as in his great movies, Stone comes out as a man who really is aware of how the world works. I admire his writing here because it is an encouragement to people to educate themselves and read and do their own research and open their eyes. This book can be provocative intellectually and generally. The critics of Stone here also make some points, but not strong enough in my opinion, Stephen Ambrose comes off as a false historian who does not look at historical events from more than one angle or opinion. Stone easily dismisses his weak attacks. There is also a great deal of good dissection of the Stone films mentioned here which range from "Salvador" to "Nixon." Rock enthusiasts will like the article dealing with Stone's film on Jim Morrison, "The Doors" and Stone's own comments on Morrison and his music. The most provocative articles are those on the two most fiery political films Stone has made, "JFK" and "Nixon." These are provocative pieces because Stone challenges our views of official history and dares us to look behind the veils of the news, historians and some writings. This is not just a book for film buffs or Stone fans and critics, it is a book for people who enjoy good, smart debating and dissections of intellectual arguments.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Adrian J. Dupont Jr. on February 6, 2009
Format: Paperback
I needed it for a class, but probably ordered it a little late. Good book though, thanks so much!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 26, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Oliver Stone slandered an innocent man in the film JFK. The greatest film critic of all, Pauline Kael, said Stone was a lousy screenwriter, and she's right. And Oliver Stone's response at the end of the book to Gerald Posner's book on the JFK assassination CASE CLOSED (that proves convincingly that Oswald was a lone gunman) is just absurd!! Every sin Stone says Posner committed--and in fact did not commit in most cases--Stone committed a million times more in JFK! I've rarely seen greater hypocrisy than I saw in Stone's Posner piece. If you want to read about an irrational, paranoid, egomaniac, go ahead and read this silly book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?