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Oliver Twist (Dover Thrift Editions) Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 362 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications; Reprint. edition (December 30, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486424537
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486424538
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #16,123 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 38 customer reviews
This story displays the evils of the Poorhouse `s of the time and the corruption of the people who work there.
rameca fiall
Those are the indelible images that stick with me, even more than the soft-hearted humor that Dickens always blends into the mix.
Avid Reader
The story of a desperately poor orphan, Oliver Twist offers a deep and complex plot, and plenty of emotional engagement.
LH422

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By C. Brandt on November 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
Dickens was a genius, and this work, written when he was in his early 20s, exemplifies that fact. The plot is a bit cliched, and deus ex machinae are everywhere, but, good Lord, the characterizations (and the accompanying names) are superb. The wry insights, the gentle cynicism, the not-so-gentle look at the poorhouses, the indelible imagery, the seamless shifts from comedy to tragedy and back again, all make for an unforgettable book--no matter how many forgettable film adaptations have been made. A joy to read.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By LH422 VINE VOICE on June 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
I've always been intimidated by Dickens, having heard so much about his legendary wordiness and trenchant prose. This was my first attempt to seriously read Dickens, and I was pleasantly surprised at just how readable this book is. I did notice Dickens's wordiness for approximately the first two pages, but after that I was drawn into the story. I was also pleasantly surprised to discover that Dickens writes with a witty sarcasm- so much for the humorless Victorians. The story of a desperately poor orphan, Oliver Twist offers a deep and complex plot, and plenty of emotional engagement. It's hard not to feel sympathy for suffering young Oliver who, by his own admission, "hasn't a friend in the world." This novel is a book about morality, and is clearly a work of social criticism. Dickens reserves his criticism not for the wealthy, who might seem the obvious target, but for social strivers. Those attempting to raise their social standing, such as the sycophantic Bumble, and the criminal miser Fagin receive the sharpest pricks of Dickens's pen. The truly wealthy are the kindest characters in the book; they are the ones who rescue Oliver and show him true kindness. Dickens kept my attention throughout this novel, I will definitely be exploring more of his canon.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Floccinaucinihilipilification on August 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
Dickens' writing is exacting, descriptive and illuminating. In structure and style, very similar to many of Dickens' other works, particularly Great Expectations - the poor orphan makes it big while encountering interesting and malevolent characters along the way.

Oliver Twist brings us dark yet humorous characters like Sikes, Fagin, the Artful Dodger, etc.

Great reading and an important part of any classic collection.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Avid Reader on November 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
What's not to love about Dickens? You've got heroes, villains, comedy, tragedy, social commentary and detailed descriptions of face, dress, and city. You've got the whole world wrapped up in a story that has you rooting for the good guys even after 150-plus years, and even though you know the good guys are too good to be true.

The story of Oliver Twist doesn't need to be retold in this review. The plot twists are ridiculous at times --- though a lot less ridiculous in Dickens' day than they would be in ours. Today, few kids are orphaned at birth, and few are shamed by being bastard children. Today, few people can move from town to town, changing their name and escaping their past. (It can be done, but it's very hard.) Today, it's believed that everyone can be redeemed and everyone can become a master of his own fate. Not so when Dickens was alive. The world really was a place in which many lives were short and brutish.

Dickens conjures up those depths, but what he does so remarkably is to show the life that survived in them and the humanity that each of us has. Humanity comes in many forms: Oliver and his little friend Dick, somehow maintaining sparks of kindness despite their horrid treatment in the parochial orphanage; the pickpocket/prostitute Nancy risking her life to save Oliver; and the evil Fagin and Bill Sykes feeling remorse about the things they've done. Those are the indelible images that stick with me, even more than the soft-hearted humor that Dickens always blends into the mix.

Dickens masterfully opens the curtain on the sordid life to which England's lower classes were consigned, and he is angry about it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Layla Bing on October 23, 2009
Format: Paperback
Oliver Twist is perhaps the most culturally prevalent of Mr. Dickens' novels. Everyone has heard the famous line: "Please sir, can I have some more?" What a lot of people don't realize is that Oliver Twist was actually Dickens' attempt at a social critique of the prevailing prejudices against the poor and downtrodden in Victorian England, and the appalling work and living conditions that they were subjected to as a result of the Poor Law of 1834. In this capacity Dickens was very successful; his novel helped draw attention to the problem and precipitated a wave of compassion toward the poor. However, his success in improving the image of one marginalized group was perhaps marred by the slandering of a second marginalized population: the Jews. Dickens' anti-semitism is very apparent in the character of the Jew Fagin who is repeatedly likened to a demon, and who is characterized by a jumble of derogatory Jewish stereotypes. By contrast, Oliver is hardly characterized at all except to be described as a kind of nebulous blob of pure goodness who is tried by hardship at every turn-- thereby winning our sympathy.

Like many of Dickens' novels, Twist's plot hangs on the convergence of coincidence. Though the seeming acts of fate that drive the story are clearly contrived, it is done in such a self-aware manner that the reader can't help but overlook the ridiculousness of the plot twists. My favorite part of Dickens' story-telling in this novel is the bitingly sarcastic manner in which it is written.
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