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The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
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on April 15, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
A wonderful account of all that goes into processing meat in the feedlots (somewhat gruesome at times), as he tries to follow the fate of one particular cow. Pollan then narrates an alternative to feedlots, in the example of one farmer who raises beef, poultry, and hogs in an environmentally sustainable fashion. In the last third of the book the author provides us a story of his attempt to become a hunter-gatherer, which is provocative and entertaining. I enjoy all of Michael Pollan's books, this is probably his best.
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on April 15, 2015
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Very eye opening read. I will never look at fast food, Whole Foods, or mushrooms the same ever again.
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on April 12, 2015
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Judging by the other reviews, it seems to be politically incorrect to say anything negative about this book. I bought it over two years ago and am still only three-quarters through it. I read a few chapters, put it aside and read another book or two, pick it up again months later and read some more, put it down again. It's got a lot of important and worthwhile stuff that people should know, but reading it is like doing homework. It could have used a good editor. It could easily be cut down by at least one-third. Instead Pollan is allowed to self-indulgently ramble on and on and on and go off on tangents. And I am someone who was already very interested in the issues involved. I tried skimming and skipping over the long passages on grass and nitrogen and whatnot, but I've given up trying to finish it. I'm just forcing myself through it at this point, which defeats the point of reading for pleasure. I advise approaching it very strategically and reading select chapters; the chapter on Big Organic is one of the best and not to be missed for anyone who wants the truth behind the organic craze. I like Pollan's approach of dividing the book among four different meals from different sources: factory farms/fast food, Whole Foods, small independent farm, and hunting. The concept of the book is great, and if you can stick with it to the end more power to you, but it's not for those with ADD.
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on April 8, 2015
Format: Paperback
In his book, Pollan presents good investigations of each food source. However, I don’t like how he gives off a completely negative impression of corn through his book. It did enlighten me that the use of it through cattle and poultry can indirectly make us sick, but with other crises such as it contributing to the obesity epidemic doesn’t persuade me that it is completely unethical to make. The result of the epidemic is human agency and consumer demands. People choose to consume the soda and beef and store the fat, carbs, and sugar in their bodies. Granted, some citizens might not have a choice to eat much healthier because of food deserts and income, but all the food would still be produced whether it be with corn or other resources such as sugar cane.
Pollan left us with an undefined answer for this whole process; however, he didn’t necessarily promise us with one. All his findings and his conclusion aren’t very helpful or hopeful for the future. He likes the idea of a grass grown agriculture, but that is questionable whether it could help feed many Americans at one time and if that system could be established in the various climates. He doesn’t give much suggestion to the industrial corn farmers on how to proceed and if it’s a good idea to start switching to an ecologically stable system. He did write this book for the average American, though, which is a good place to change the values of the consumers of the food, which can indirectly change what industries will do to make the food.
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on April 8, 2015
Format: Paperback
I believe that though Michael Pollan doesn’t necessarily answer the question what to eat, he does give us a greater awareness of what we are eating. He compares and contrasts the ways in which our foods are produced and acquired. Through this, he gives us a greater understanding of all the work and the costs that it take to eat the meals that we take so much for granted. By teaching us the processes our food production and its pros and cons, Pollan has stretched our paradigms to see what is beyond the food on our plates and to see how the environment, animals, people, and even the economy is fully involved. Through this understanding, we can truly appreciate every bite that we eat and to take a step closer to our home and towards who we are as omnivores and human beings.
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on April 1, 2015
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Great read for anyone the likes food and wants to learn about our food industry and learning about alternative ways to buy and consume products. I had to buy this book for a course in college and it is loaded with useful information. I do not regret the buy as Michael Pollan is a terrific author and gives you insight to all possible perspectives, not just the one that seems best or most moral. He seems un-biased and willing to give you the best possible answer there is.
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on March 26, 2015
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Great book
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on March 23, 2015
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ok book
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on March 22, 2015
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I absolutely love this book. Pollan is such a gifted writer that his work is a delight to read. The book is both captivating and highly informative.
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on March 19, 2015
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
Well written book and very informative. It makes you think about what you put in your mouth.
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