Start reading On My Honor on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Add Audible Narration

On My Honor
Narrated by Johnny Heller
$14.67 $9.95
Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

On My Honor [Kindle Edition]

Marion Dane Bauer
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (202 customer reviews)

Digital List Price: $6.99 What's this?
Print List Price: $6.99
Kindle Price: $4.99
You Save: $2.00 (29%)

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Audible Narration

Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $9.95 when you buy the Kindle book.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $4.99  
Library Binding $15.48  
Paperback $6.99  
Audible Audio Edition, Unabridged $0.00 Free with your Audible trial
Mass Market Paperback --  
Audio, Cassette, Unabridged --  
Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Book Description

Joel's best friend Tony drowns while they are swimming in the forbidden, treacherous Vermilion River. Joel is terrified at having to tell of his disobedience and overwhelmed by his feelings of guilt.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This is a devastating but beautifully written story of a boy's all-consuming guilt over the role he plays in the death of his best friend. Joel and Tony have been together since they were babies. Although Tony's crazy jokes and wildness sometimes make Joel feel as if he were much older, and even make Joel angry, no one is as exciting as Tony. But when Tony suggests they climb the bluffs at Starved Rock, Joel is frightened, knowing how dangerous the bluffs are. He's also afraid of Tony's sharp tongue, though, so he asks his father for permission to ride his bike to Starved Rock, certain that his father will say no. When his father says yes, Joel finds himself riding Tony's old, beat-up bikewhile Tony coasts along on Joel's 10-speedout to the state park. Halfway there the boys cross the Vermillion River, and Tony, who earlier had refused to go swimming at the pool with Joel, decides to swim in the river instead. Angry at Tony's lack of sensethe river is both dangerous and dirty Joel dares Tony to race out to a distant sandbar with him. Then the unthinkable occurs: Joel reaches the sandbar; Tony disappears. The realization slams into Joel with its hideous finality. Tony is dead, and it is all his fault. Joel's efforts to cope with his staggering sense of guilt are handled with stark reality, so that the reader shares his sense of the enormity of life's unfairness. Yet within Joel's first perception of the total uncertainties of life, there is also the steadfastness of his father's love. While there is death, there is also love, and Bauer's honest and gripping novel joins the ranks of such as Katherine Paterson's Bridge to Terabithia in its handling of these issues.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-6 Twelve-year-old Joel has unwillingly agreed to bike out to the state park with his daredevil friend Tony. "On his honor," he promises his father to be careful, knowing that Tony wants them to climb the dangerous park bluffs. When they arrive, however, Tony abruptly changes his mind and heads for the river. With his promise jangling in his mind, Joel follows Tony in for a swim. Tony drowns in the dirty, turbulent water, leaving Joel to face his guilty conscience, and his father, alone. In this short but solid novel, Bauer effectively portrays the dilemma of pre-adolescents, old enough to want to meet their own challenges without adult interference, young enough to want grownup protection and reassurance. Joel understands only too well the moral dilemma he faces, but he is so bound by peer pressure that wrong choices and tragedy are almost inevitable. Bauer's association of Joel's guilt with the smell of the polluted river on his skin is particularly noteworthy. Its miasma almost rises off the pages. Descriptions are vivid, characterization and dialogue natural, and the style taut but unforced. A powerful, moving book. Barbara Hutcheson, Greater Victoria Public Library, Canada
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 362 KB
  • Print Length: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Clarion Books; Reissue edition (September 22, 1986)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003KK5DYA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #82,011 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely appropriate!!! October 4, 2005
Format:Paperback
This book is going to be read to my son's 5th grade class, so I thought I'd read it before I gave the ok for my son to sit in. It is quite an emotional read, but I think, for ages around 9 or 10 and up (pre-adolescent), it's absolutely appropriate! It deals with peer pressure, lying, and guilt among other things, and hopefully will make these indestructible-thinking kids realize that "it CAN happen to me" and not give in to the pressures that go along with these ages, especially among boys. You don't have to do something just because "I DARE YOU!".

Except for the use of the word he**, there was no inappropriate language and, no, the re was *NOT* a detailed account of the boy's drowning. I'm not quite sure where that came from. The "beat his friend to a bloody pulp if he was hiding somewhere", put into context, is a boy feeling nervous/scared/angry when he can't find his friend, suspects the worst and would be furious if he's (the friend) actually just hiding and trying to pull a prank. Given the fact these boys are 12, the words used are quite mild.

I'm sure this subject matter is uncomfortable for some kids (and, obviously adults as well). Unfortunately, peer pressure is a FACT OF LIFE that has to be dealt with. Overall, I'd recommend this book. Read it first before you read it (or allow your child to read it) and then decide.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sad, Yet Perfect October 17, 1998
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
On My Honor , by Marion Dane Bauer, is one of the best stories I have ever read! Even though it was sad, it was still perfect. It's a good story for people who like exciting stories. The characters in this story are Joel and Tony. They are living in a small town in Illinois. The story all starts when Joel's father allows Joel and Tony to go cycling, but not too far. Joel and Tony disobey Joel's father and go to the river. They were told never to go near the river, but they do. They start swimming to a sandbar. When Joel gets to the sandbar he realizes Tony has vanished. TONY WAS DEAD! How can Joel tell his parents what has happened? How can he tell everyone the terrible truth? It was a great story. It didn't have too many difficult vocabulary words. I am now in 6th grade and I found this book very easy to read. Over the past few months I have been reading GOOSBUMPS, but this story is different. It taught a valuable lesson: Never do something you were told not to. Your parents always tell you things to help you avoid trouble and danger.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly Touching August 11, 2005
Format:Paperback
I read this book in fifth or sixth grade and I can honestly say it's the most touching thing I have ever read. I sobbed when it was finished and every time I reread it I can't get to the end without crying at least a little.

Simply put, it deals with guilt and death in adolescence. This is something I will no doubt mention in my college entrance essays and I highly recommend it. It is short, an easy and good read, and something you will remember for the rest of your life.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars High Praise Deserved March 2, 2000
By A Customer
Format:School & Library Binding
Bauer, Marion Dane. (1986). On My Honor. Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing New York. This was what I would call a tremendous quick read because you could just go right with Joel, who is twelve and on a bicycle trip with his reckless best friend, Tony. You are just hooked as soon as the plot begins to thicken, when Tony stops at the river and suggests a swim and the boys argue you can just so relate, and then on a dare both boys try to swim to an island in the middle. Without disclosing too much of the actual details, this book is just magnetic, because the plot heightens to the point of tears. It is an emotionally strong story simply told all in one day's time. The realistic portrayal of a grieving boy's conscience evolves you to be sympathetic for the father and son. This plot escalates to anger, fear, and personal loss and would be a great read for any young person with emotion and heart.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Parent's Review--read this! (with adult guidance!!!) January 28, 1999
Format:Paperback
Before I start this review let me say that I am the mother of two (11 and 9), and a grade school teacher.
This book covers a subject that is every parent's nightmare! (Your child fights for their life, and you are not able to help them.) All kids believe that they are immortal, and because of this, they are fearless. But we, parent's, know better. We try to protect them, and teach them right from wrong. We pray that they will make the right choices in life, but know that sometimes they won't.
It is this fearlessness, and the possibility that things just may go terribly wrong, that is discussed in this book. Not in a preachy parent style, but rather from the viewpoint of a scared and helpless child. As I read this (and by the way, I read it in one seating-not able to put it down--not able to catch my breath),I realized that this is a book that my children must read. Every child should read it!! But not without adult guidance. The book and it's subject matter call for discussion. Your child may need comforting after this book, but it also will wake them up to the fact that there are dangers out there, and they must be careful.
Decisions made in the blink of an eye can change an entire lifetime, or in this case, end a life.
PLEASE, read this one and then discuss it!!!!!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Helps to Teach the principle of "Making Your Word Yes Mean Yes"
This was a book which taught a powerful lesson of what our honor means. Although my son is 14 years old, he and I enjoy being read to and it was my turn to read to him. Read more
Published 1 month ago by M.R. - Rivsd, Ca
5.0 out of 5 stars great book
I will be using for a book study! Great life story for children, also touches on the importance of life.
Published 1 month ago by O. Orzech
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing
The book is great and is good for 11 year olds. My son loved the book it's his favorite book
Published 2 months ago by K. Brockberg
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Great book for children entering middle school. Main character has personal turmoil that many preteens go through.
Published 2 months ago by marf
4.0 out of 5 stars It was good.
At first I really disliked the book, but that ending was very heart felt and really just made the book great. Very happy I read it.
Published 3 months ago by Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
love it
Published 3 months ago by June
4.0 out of 5 stars good
Just a little confusing I had to read some twice but good. I think the author did a good job.
Published 3 months ago by Adrianne E. Hart
3.0 out of 5 stars The subject matter and consequences of a decision are a ...
The subject matter and consequences of a decision are a middle school topic but the story is just so predictable.
Published 4 months ago by margaret duffy
5.0 out of 5 stars it was a good story!
The part of this story that I liked most was when Joel asked his dad infront of Tony if he could ride his bike to Staved Mountain in hope that would say, "no" so that he... Read more
Published 4 months ago by jZ
5.0 out of 5 stars Great
This book is amazing....just my type.....it has a sad ending and leaves you in suspense it's amazing and left me at the edge of my seat I LOVE IT!
Published 5 months ago by animal lover
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

*******************************************
Newbery Honor Winner Continues to Challenge Herself--
and Readers--Twenty-Five Years Later
http://bit.ly/25mdane
*******************************************

Marion Dane Bauer is the author of more than eighty books for young people, ranging from novelty and picture books through early readers, both fiction and nonfiction, books on writing, and middle-grade and young-adult novels. She has won numerous awards, including several Minnesota Book Awards, a Jane Addams Peace Association Award for RAIN OF FIRE, an American Library Association Newbery Honor Award for ON MY HONOR, a number of state children's choice awards and the Kerlan Award from the University of Minnesota for the body of her work.

She is also the editor of and a contributor to the ground-breaking collection of gay and lesbian short stories, Am I Blue? Coming Out from the Silence.

Marion was one of the founding faculty and the first Faculty Chair for the Master of Fine Arts in Writing for Children and Young Adults program at Vermont College of Fine Arts. Her writing guide, the American Library Association Notable WHAT'S YOUR STORY? A YOUNG PERSON'S GUIDE TO WRITING FICTION, is used by writers of all ages. Her books have been translated into more than a dozen different languages.

She has six grandchildren and lives in St. Paul, Minnesota, with her partner and a cavalier King Charles spaniel, Dawn.

-------------------------------------
INTERVIEW WITH MARION DANE BAUER
-------------------------------------

Q. What brought you to a career as a writer?

A. I seem to have been born with my head full of stories. For almost as far back as I can remember, I used most of my unoccupied moments--even in school when I was supposed to be doing other "more important" things--to make up stories in my head. I sometimes got a notation on my report card that said, "Marion dreams." It was not a compliment. But while the stories I wove occupied my mind in a very satisfying way, they were so complex that I never thought of trying to write them down. I wouldn't have known where to begin. So though I did all kinds of writing through my teen and early adult years--letters, journals, essays, poetry--I didn't begin to gather the craft I needed to write stories until I was in my early thirties. That was also when my last excuse for not taking the time to sit down to do the writing I'd so long wanted to do started first grade.

Q. And why write for young people?

A. Because I get my creative energy in examining young lives, young issues. Most people, when they enter adulthood, leave childhood behind, by which I mean that they forget most of what they know about themselves as children. Of course, the ghosts of childhood still inhabit them, but they deal with them in other forms--problems with parental authority turn into problems with bosses, for instance--and don't keep reaching back to the original source to try to fix it, to make everything come out differently than it did the first time. Most children's writers, I suspect, are fixers. We return, again and again, usually under the cover of made-up characters, to work things through. I don't know that our childhoods are necessarily more painful than most. Every childhood has pain it, because life has pain in it at every stage. The difference is that we are compelled to keep returning to the source.

Q. You write for a wide range of ages. Do you write from a different place in writing for preschoolers than for young adolescents?

A. In a picture book or board book, I'm always writing from the womb of the family, a place that--while it might be intruded upon by fears, for instance--is still, ultimately, safe and nurturing. That's what my own early childhood was like, so it's easy for me to return to those feelings and to recreate them.
When I write for older readers, I'm writing from a very different experience. My early adolescence, especially, was a time of deep alienation, mostly from my peers but in some ways from my family as well. And so I write my older stories out of that pain, that longing for connection. A story has to have a problem at its core. No struggle, no story. And so that struggle for connection has become the central experience of all my older fiction. It's what gives my stories heart and meaning.

Q. How does your Newbery Honor novel, On My Honor, fit with that pattern of writing about alienation and connection?

A. It would be easy to say that On My Honor is different from my other novels in that it was the first story I ever drew from a real event. Having a friend drown in a river wasn't something that happened to me, but it happened to a friend of mine when we were twelve or thirteen. When I heard about the incident at the time I felt it in a visceral way. What would it be like to have a choice I made turn into something so terrible and to know that I could never do anything to make the situation right? I wondered. That's where I started when I began writing the story, with the two boys on their bikes heading toward the river, everything about to go terribly wrong. Very quickly, though, I realized that while I had a clear story problem, the drowning, I had no solution for the problem . . . unless I was going to bring Tony back to life, and I wasn't writing that kind of story. At that point I instinctively backed up and started again. This time I began with Joel, the main character, asking his father's permission to bike with his friend Tony out to the state park, something Tony is pressuring him to do and which Joel is hoping his father will forbid. His father, not understanding the situation, gives permission, and Joel is furious . . . alienated. Once I had that opening, the frame for my story was set. Alienation in the opening, reconciliation at the end. The reconciliation can't change the fact of Tony's death, but it gives closure and comfort. So it fits the usual pattern for my novels. (Perhaps I should note that I didn't do any of this consciously. I wasn't saying, "I write about alienation and reconnection. How can I fit that in here?" I just reached for events that made the story feel right for me, and those were the ones to present themselves.)

Q. You often write animal stories: Ghost Eye, Runt, A Bear Named Trouble, and now Little Dog, Lost is about to come out. Is there any particular reason that you write about animals?

A. The first reason I write about animals is because animals touch a deep chord in my own psyche. I have always been fascinated by the pets that share my life, by watching their minds work, by noting their emotions, by feeling the life that pulses through them. So writing about animals just feels right. But I write about animals, also, because animal stories are universal. If I'm writing about a twelve-year-old boy it is assumed that I'm writing for other ten, eleven, twelve-year-old boys. If I'm writing about a cat, a wolf, a bear, a dog, I'm writing for everyone . . . even adults, even myself. Perhaps especially myself.

Q. You are known as a writing teacher as well as a writer. How to you find a balance between teaching and writing?

A. I have taught for many years, though I'm retired from teaching now except for occasional very time-limited stints. My most recent teaching was through the Vermont College of Fine Arts in their MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults program. But I have taken care to make sure my primary time and energy were devoted to my own writing. I made sure I was a writer who teaches, not a teacher who writes.

Q. How has teaching writing impacted your own development as a writer?

A. Being a writing teacher has, of course, sharpened my skills as a critic. You can't say to a developing writer, "Your story doesn't work." You have to tell her what specifically doesn't work and why and then, without intruding, give suggestions about what the next step might be in strengthening that story. Having, again and again, to define with thought and care what is needed in other writers' work brings me back to my own work with deepened insights. Eventually, I teach myself what I'm teaching others, and having said it to others makes it easier to hear for myself. One time my partner, who was not a writer herself but who had heard me speak to writers on a number of occasions, read an early draft of one of my stories and said, "Wouldn't you say . . . to one of your students?" And . . . was exactly what that story needed, so I learned from myself through her.

Q. You've been writing stories for young people for more than forty years, and you've mentioned that you keep playing out some of the same deep themes. How do you manage to keep your work fresh?

A. One of the things that keeps my work fresh is moving between different genres. A picture book requires such different energy than a young novella, and a different rhythm, too. A young novella has a different rhythm and energy than an older novel. Nonfiction is its own experience. Moving between the various demands of the various kinds of work keeps me from ever settling into a rut. When I'm writing a young chapter book, a chapter is about five pages long. It's just a natural shape those younger stories fall into. And I love climbing into a chapter knowing I can, very quickly, climb out again. But then when I turn to an older novel where chapters can be much longer, I love equally settling in and fleshing my world out, stretching. One of my most recent books, a novella called Little Dog, Lost, moves into the territory of fiction in verse, something entirely new for me. I took such pleasure in writing that story because I had to discover how to do what I was doing at every step along the way. Even after more than 80 books published, everything about that story felt fresh because the way I was presenting it was fresh for me.

Q. What is your deepest motivation in writing for children?

A. I entered the field with a single passion ... to be a truth teller. I grew up in at a time when children were routinely lied to, lies of omission--information we were carefully shielded from--as much as overt untruths. And my mother, while certainly well intentioned, was probably better than most both at shielding and at lying to "protect" me. When I grew old enough to understand the ways I'd been lied to, I was furious. And I was also determined not to follow the same path in dealing with children myself, my own children or the ones I wrote for. Children are far less apt to be shielded from basic information these days. In fact, they are bombarded through the media with what may be a too explicit view--certainly too skewed and dark a view--of the world they are entering. But they still need the deep realities of the life that stands before them--the pain of it and the hope--to be interpreted in a straightforward and wise way. That's what my stories attempt to do, to tell the truth as I know it. It's truth with a small t, of course, because it is my truth, not something handed down from on high, but it's the very best of what I have to bring to the page.

Q. Finally, you've been writing and teaching for a long time. You have retired from teaching. Do you expect to retire from writing some day?

A. I hope not. I hope to be able to continue writing as long as my brain still works. It's like breathing. It's not just what I do for a livelihood. It's what I do to live.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Forums

Topic From this Discussion
Kid reviews Be the first to reply
Have something you'd like to share about this product?
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

Look for Similar Items by Category