On Your Feet Or On Your Knees

April 18, 1989 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
7:28
30
2
4:55
30
3
5:24
30
4
4:19
30
5
8:42
30
6
6:59
30
7
4:39
30
8
4:04
30
9
8:13
30
10
5:06
30
11
8:48
30
12
6:21
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: April 18, 1989
  • Release Date: April 18, 1989
  • Label: Columbia
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:14:58
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138HA0Q
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,170 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Bud Sturguess on June 4, 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
When surveying Blue Oyster Cult's catalog of live albums, it's apparent that each of these in-concert releases was carefully placed at a specific point in the band's career, to sum up or end a particular epoch. Such albums include "Some Enchanted Evening" (1978), "Extraterrestrial Live" (1982), and the recent triumph "A Long Day's Night." Each live album balanced old and new material, describing the advances and new territories discovered, while making sure to note the material from previous eras that made the progression possible. 1975's "On Your Feet Or On Your Knees" was the first of these releases, an homage to BOC's first three albums (all of which were landmark recordings for the heavy metal genre), and a reliable testament to what kept this great band alive-loyal touring and performing.
The blazing fury on this album completely blows away many, if not most, live albums that came before it; in 1975, Peter Frampton's "Frampton Comes Alive" was still a year away, and artists were not yet mistaking his example and disguising greatest hits albums under the live album mask (though some bands did manage to make live albums a meaningful event). Some of the only concert recordings released before "On Your Feet Or On Your Knees" that had as much fire and energy were The Who's "Live at Leeds," Deep Purple's "Made in Japan," and Bob Dylan & The Band's "Before the Flood."
The focus on these songs should not be so much on melody as on the fact that each of these five men are playing their guts out. The extended guitar readings that dominate the album are pure heavy metal passion and a musical bond that few bands can perfect.
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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By S. R. on February 16, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Blue Oyster Cult recorded "On Your Feet..." at a time when they were selling out venues all over the world without the benefit of a hit single anywhere. A raw sounding record with NO OVERDUBS shows the rabidness of the band and gives a wicked slice of their first few releases with a couple cover songs thrown in, to boot. Speaking about sonics, this album will not impress you at first especially if your under the age 25, but give it a further listen a realize the time it was (I'm not saying its a badly recorded album, it just sounds like a mid 70s live album). "Then came the Last Days of May" features killer Buck Dharma solos, and is one of the coolest songs of the era, and the band's re-working of the Yardbirds "I aint got You" is also very good rock. This is the band before "Don't fear The Reaper" was released and before their style began to progress to a more adult-oriented rock and roll. But it's all good, and it's all cranked to high volume. A good lost classic for any collectors of landmark musical recordings. An interesting piece of history from an american metal band amongst a sea of British metal gods. An album worthy of the landmark title and should be on the tip of tongues of metal-heads everywhere like Led Zeppelin, and Black Sabbath is today. Blue Oyster Cult took a back seat to NO metal band of ANY era they just progressed beyond the (for lack of a better phrase) the teenage genre. Check it out.
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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Music on July 28, 2004
Format: Audio CD
In a darkened room, set up your speakers on the floor about four feet apart. Now, lay down with your head on a pillow positioned midway between your speakers. I'm serious! Crank up Last Days of May (without making your ears bleed) and close your eyes.

Now, picture white clad Buck Dharma, bathed in blue light, standing alone in a smoky spotlight beam. A heady brew of pot and perfume permeates the air. Buck looks down as you strain against the crowd that yearns for your spot on the barrier, longing to worship at his feet. He smiles at you with his infectious grin and nods knowingly as he effortlesly produces the most unearthly, mournful wails ever to emanate from a guitar. You stare in disbelief and a shiver comes over you as if it was you in that ill-fated back seat, with your life-blood flowing and your mispent life slipping away before your eyes. The crush fades as the crowd becomes mesmerized. Lighters begin to pierce the darkness like stars on a moonless night. Someone nearby lets out a shrill whistle. Buck turns and your ears buzz with a harmonic ringing, like a pickup on Buck's guitar. The solo ends with a flourish, the lights come up and he joins Eric Bloom, clad in sunglasses and a theatrical black cape, as they bring the song to a finish. The spell is broken and the air is forced from your lungs as the crowd surges forward, pinning you against the barrier. You could die a happy man now. You have witnessed one of the greatest live songs ever recorded.

This album captures Blue Oyster Cult's musical genius and raw power like lightning in a bottle. At the time this was recorded, the sound level at a BOC concert could probably be measured on a seismograph!

Unlike most live albums, many of the songs here are actually better than the studio versions.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Chet Fakir on August 1, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Almost all the songs are from BOC's first three and strongest albums: the black and white albums; so called because of their incredibly cool black and white covers. The three songs not found on those albums are the covers: Born To Be Wild and Maserati GT(I ain't got you) and the excellent instrumental showcase Buck's Boogie. Every song on this live album is better than it's studio counterpart. They're much more powerful, better sung in most cases, more emotional and the solos more heady and wild. There's not a bad song in the bunch, oh yeah and unlike today they didn't overdub the songs in the studio to fix live mistakes. Which makes this album the finest in BOC's career and one of the best live albums of the seventies. It's just that good.
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