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One Church, Many Tribes : Following Jesus the Way God Made You Paperback – August 8, 2000

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From the Back Cover

In this captivating chronicle of the Native American story, Richard Twiss of the Rosebud Lakota/Sioux sifts through myth and legend to reveal God's strategy for the nation's host people. With wit, wisdom, and passion, Twiss shows God's desire to use the cultures of First Nations peoples--in all their mystery, color and beauty--to break through to those involved in New Age mysticism, Eastern religions, even Islam. One Church, Many Tribes is a rallying cry for the Church to work as one so that the lost may learn to walk in life with beauty, along the path of the Waymaker.

About the Author

RICHARD TWISS is a member of the Rosebud Lakota/Sioux Tribe. He believes that no other people group is so uniquely positioned by God for world evangelization as Native Americans. Co-founder and president of Wiconi International, Richard is also a member of the International Reconciliation Coalition. He has been a national conference speaker for Promise Keepers and has appeared as a guest on the "Focus on the Family" radio program. Richard, wife Katherine and their four sons live in Washington.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Regal; Revised edition (August 8, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830725458
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830725458
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #753,146 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 36 people found the following review helpful By James S. Taylor on January 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is half exploration of the Native experience with the Church, and half examination of how a Christian life should manifest itself in particular cultures. Twiss gives a good general introduction to the spectacularly poor manner in which First Nations peoples have been treated as not merely targets of evangelization, but as believers who did not find the alleged brotherhood of the faith either very brotherly or faithful. It is a sad, disgusting tale, made personal by the account of Chief Spokane Garry.
It is the rest of the book, however, where the hope shines through. Here, Twiss asks the darn good question: Why shouldn't First Nations persons use their own instruments, music, dress, and dance to honor God? Yes, why not? He expands the argument to include aboriginal peoples all around the world, and it is actually applicable to any culture that wonders why it's being fed the Western way as the alleged way things are to be done. He developes a careful, Biblically sensitive mindset on how to think through these issues, such that one can disassociate cultural items from an original context that may not have been consonant with Biblical values, and give them new life in the Christian worldview. It is a great vision of Christ transforming culture. When this type of thinking catches on around the world, the kingdom will grow in leaps and bounds. For anyone who feels their culture, or subculture, has been stepped on by middle-class Western values that someone has tried to hide in God's mouth, this book will help set you free to drum, create, dance, and dress in ways that both make sense to your people and honor your God.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Steven Crane on July 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
When my family moved to Kentucky in 2000, I never expected it would take eighteen months to find a church that wanted us. We didn't fit in anyone's denominational or cultural "box", and very few fellow Christians were interested in stretching their boundaries to include us.

Imagine waiting five centuries to be welcomed into the Body of Christ. That's the sobering, challenging message of One Church, Many Tribes.

In bringing the message of Jesus to the indigenous peoples of this continent, far too often the expectation has been that a conversion to Christianity includes a conversion to whiteness, and that God has no use for Native American languages, history, arts, etc. This couldn't be more wrong. As Twiss puts it, "When we come to Christ as First Nations people, Jesus does not ask us to abandon our sin-stained culture in order to embrace someone else's sin-stained culture."

However, this is not a "make white people feel bad" book. Twiss admits that, had God chosen the peoples of this hemisphere to take the Gospel to Europe, there would have been similar abuses. He wants to see reconciliation: for whites to repent of their superiority, and for Native Americans to repent of their bitterness, so that we can put away these past sins and work together as equals.

The Body of Christ is undeniably richer for the presence of African and African-American cultures, despite the bitterness of slavery and the evil aspects of colonialism. It's time to welcome Native Americans to the table (and other "first nations" peoples as well), and encourage them to let God speak through their cultures.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Leroy A. Peters on May 22, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a devout Christian who is very much into the Culture of the American Indian, I find it a breath of fresh air to find and listen to the likes of Richard Twiss. I'm already in chapter 5 of this wonderful book and it has helped me with my faith in Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and His Word the Holy Bible. As much as I read about the American Indian, you hardly hear about those who not only christians but Ministers such as Pastor Twiss. If I ever get stationed out in South Dakota, I hope to visit him and work with him and many of brothers and sisters. I maybe Black, but we are all children of God. The Bible gives no mention to a man or woman's skin color. May God bless Pastor Twiss and his family. Thank you for this wonderful book. To all the naysayers(not just the atheists, but those in the church as well), if you don't like this book or appreciate what Pastor Twiss is trying to do, then you don't have to read it and if you haven't read it, then please don't be coming on here and give ignorant biased opinions. I'm asking you nicely.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A. C. Taylor on July 19, 2002
Format: Paperback
...at how balanced this work is. Twiss does an admirable job of presenting a coherent and sensitive biblical viewpoint on the cultural influences on both Scripture - which he obviously holds in high regard - and our theologizing. This allows the reader to have a greater understanding of how cultural blind spots exist in our theological and religious thinking. At the same time, the author explores both the possibility and desireability of cultural awareness, sensitivity and incorporation into our theology and church's (or messianic synagogue's) life.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By kansaspoet on October 15, 2008
Format: Paperback
Chief Joseph, leader of the Nez Perce in the late 1800s and early 1900s once said that between the white settlers and Native Americans, they were "too many misinterpretations, too many misunderstandings." Unfortunately, today these misunderstandings and misinterpretations still exist across cultures and within the church. As a non-Native American, I am in full agreement with the message of this book. For healing to come across cultures, we need to honestly look at the past relationships and at the validity of each culture, knowing that all people are created in God's image and worthy of his love, equally. I recommend this book for anyone who desires to understand the foundations of the bias that still exists in many churches across our nation and to tear down those things that have created the misinterpretations and misunderstandings which have kept us from accepting one another, even in our differences.
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